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I'd like to round up to 2 decimal places, but only if necessary.

Input:

10
1.7777777
9.1

Output:

10
1.78
9.1

How can I do this in JavaScript?

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possible duplicate of How do I round a number in javascript? –  Esailija Aug 6 '12 at 17:29
3  
I made a fiddle with many of the techniques offered as solutions here ... so you can compare: fiddle –  dsdsdsdsd Nov 18 '13 at 9:45

21 Answers 21

up vote 361 down vote accepted

Use Math.round(num * 100) / 100

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69  
While this will work for most cases, it will not work for 1.005 which will end up coming out to be 1 instead of 1.01 –  James Jun 13 '13 at 14:33
7  
@James Wow that's really weird- I'm working in the Chrome dev console and I'm noticing that 1.005 * 100 = 100.49999999999999. Math.round(100.49999999999999) evaluates to 100, whereas Math.round(100.5) evaluates to 101. IE9 does the same thing. This is due to floating point weirdness in javascript –  stinkycheeseman Jul 26 '13 at 17:32
12  
A simple workaround. For 2 d.p., use Math.round((num + 0.00001) * 100) / 100. Try Math.round((1.005 + 0.00001) * 100) / 100 and Math.round((1.0049 + 0.00001) * 100) / 100 –  mrkschan Oct 9 '13 at 7:01
1  
@mrkschan Why does that work, and is that foolproof for all numbers? –  CMCDragonkai Mar 3 at 4:45
    
@CMCDragonkai, the workaround i mentioned is not foolproof for all numbers and it just works up to 3 d.p. –  mrkschan Mar 5 at 6:50

If value is text type:

parseFloat("123.456").toFixed(2);

If value is number:

var numb = 123.23454;
numb = numb.toFixed(2);

There is a downside that values like 1.5 will give "1.50" as the output. A fix suggested by @minitech:

var numb = 1.5;
numb = +numb.toFixed(2);
// Note the plus sign that drops any "extra" zeroes at the end.
// It changes the result (which is a string) into a number again (think "0 + foo"),
// which means that it uses only as many digits as necessary.
share|improve this answer
27  
This one (the toFixed) approach is good, and worked for me, but it specifically does not comply with the original request of "only when necessary". (It rounds 1.5 to 1.50, which breaks the spec.) –  Per Lundberg Apr 28 '13 at 20:09
    
For the "when necessary" requirement, do this: parseFloat(number.toFixed(decimalPlaces)); @PerLundberg –  Onur Yıldırım Dec 30 '13 at 2:23
5  
parseFloat("55.555").toFixed(2) returns "55.55" in the Chrome dev console. –  Levi Botelho Apr 6 at 16:02
2  
There is no advantage of using toFixed instead of Math.round; toFixed leads to quite the same rounding problems (try them with 5.555 and 1.005), but is like 500x (no kidding) slower than Math.round ... Seems like @MarkG answer is the more accurate here. –  Pierre May 20 at 16:49
    
I ended up having the best luck with Number(myValue.toFixed(2)) as sometimes toFixed returns a string value. Adding a number such as myValue.toFixed(2) + 0.0 only concatenated the string instead of coercing the value to a number in my tests. –  jocull May 28 at 15:42

You can use

function roundToTwo(num) {    
    return +(Math.round(num + "e+2")  + "e-2");
}

I found this over on MDN. Their way avoids the problem with 1.005 that was mentioned.

roundToTwo(1.005)
1.01
roundToTwo(10)
10
roundToTwo(1.7777777)
1.78
roundToTwo(9.1)
9.1
share|improve this answer
    
What does the +() do? –  Redsandro Feb 20 at 11:54
2  
@Redsandro, +(val) is the coercion equivalent of using Number(val). Concatenating "e-2" to an number resulted in a string that needed to be converted back to a number. –  Jack Feb 28 at 19:11
1  
What does coercion equivalent mean exactly? +() means typecast to Number? Is it exactly the same as Number() or are there differences? –  Redsandro Feb 28 at 19:43
4  
Beware that for big and tiny floats that would produce NaN since, eg +"1e-21+2" wont be parsed correctly. –  Pierre May 20 at 17:13
    
You've 'solved' the 1.005 'problem', but introduced a new one: now, in the Chrome console, roundToTwo(1.0049999999999999) comes out as 1.01 (inevitably, since 1.0049999999999999 == 1.005). It seems to me that the float you get if you type num = 1.005 'obviously' 'should' round to 1.00, because the exact value of num is less than 1.005. Of course, it also seems to me that the string '1.005' 'obviously' 'should' be rounded to 1.01. The fact that different people seem to have different intuitions about what the actual correct behaviour is here is part of why it's complicated. –  Mark Amery Aug 14 at 21:56

None of the answers found here is correct. @stinkycheeseman asked to round up, you all rounded the number.

To round up, use this:

Math.ceil(num * 100)/100;
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4  
The example input and output show that although the question said 'round up...' it was actually intended to be 'round to...'. –  JayDM Jul 5 '13 at 4:18
1  
@stinkycheeseman was pointing out an error in a specific case, he didn't want to always round up as ceil does, he just wanted 0.005 to round up to 0.01 –  mjaggard Aug 23 '13 at 10:17
4  
Found weird bug while testing Math.ceil(1.1 * 100)/100; -it returns 1.11, because 1.1*100 is 110.00000000000001 according to brand new modern browsers Firefox, Chrome, Safari and Opera... IE, in old fashion, still thinks 1.1*100=1100. –  skobaljic Oct 21 '13 at 11:57
    
@skobaljic try Math.ceil(num.toFixed(4) * 100) / 100 –  treeface Dec 11 '13 at 23:07
    
@treeface Math.ceil((1.1).toFixed(4) * 100) / 100 will also return 1.11 in Firefox, the modern browsers problem/bug is with multiplication and people should know about it (I worked on a lottery game that time for example). –  skobaljic Jan 9 at 9:43

MarkG's answer is the correct one. Here's a generic extension for any number of decimal places.

Number.prototype.round = function(places) {
  return +(Math.round(this + "e+" + places)  + "e-" + places);
}

Usage:

var n = 1.7777;    
n.round(2); // 1.78

Unit test:

it.only('should round floats to 2 places', function() {

  var cases = [
    { n: 10,      e: 10,    p:2 },
    { n: 1.7777,  e: 1.78,  p:2 },
    { n: 1.005,   e: 1.01,  p:2 },
    { n: 1.005,   e: 1,     p:0 },
    { n: 1.77777, e: 1.8,   p:1 }
  ]

  cases.forEach(function(testCase) {
    var r = testCase.n.round(testCase.p);
    assert.equal(r, testCase.e, 'didn\'t get right number');
  });
})
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2  
Pierre raised a serious issue with MarkG's answer. –  dsjoerg Jun 18 at 16:23

Here is a simple way to do it:

Math.round(value * 100) / 100

You might want to go ahead and make a separate function to do it for you though:

function roundToTwo(value) {
    return(Math.round(value * 100) / 100);
}

Then you would simply pass in the value.

You could enhance it to round to any arbitrary number of decimals by adding a second parameter.

function myRound(value, places) {
    var multiplier = Math.pow(10, places);

    return (Math.round(value * multiplier) / multiplier);
}
share|improve this answer

Consider .toFixed() and .toPrecision():

http://www.javascriptkit.com/javatutors/formatnumber.shtml

share|improve this answer
    
toFixed adds the decimal points to every value no matter what. –  stinkycheeseman Aug 6 '12 at 17:22
2  
Both are useless here –  Esailija Aug 6 '12 at 17:23
    
Unfortunately, both functions will add extra decimal places which @stinkycheeseman appears to not want. –  jackwanders Aug 6 '12 at 17:24
2  

MarkG and Lavamantis offered a much better solution than the one that has been accepted. It's a shame they don't get more upvotes!

Here is the function I use to solve the floating point decimals issues also based on MDN. It is even more generic (but less concise) than Lavamantis's solution:

function round(value, exp) {
  if (typeof exp === 'undefined' || +exp === 0)
    return Math.round(value);

  value = +value;
  exp  = +exp;

  if (isNaN(value) || !(typeof exp === 'number' && exp % 1 === 0))
    return NaN;

  // Shift
  value = value.toString().split('e');
  value = Math.round(+(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] + exp) : exp)));

  // Shift back
  value = value.toString().split('e');
  return +(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] - exp) : -exp));
}

Use it with:

round(10.8034, 2);      // Returns 10.8
round(1.275, 2);        // Returns 1.28
round(1.27499, 2);      // Returns 1.27
round(1.2345678e+2, 2); // Returns 123.46

Compared to Lavamantis's solution, we can do...

round(1234.5678, -2); // Returns 1200
round("123.45");      // Returns 123
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Thank you for this. I'm totally stealing it for my project. –  Grant Birchmeier Aug 23 at 3:21
+(10).toFixed(2); // = 10
+(10.12345).toFixed(2); // = 10.12

(10).toFixed(2); // = 10.00
(10.12345).toFixed(2); // = 10.12
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Even though this topic is a little old.. here is a prototype method.

Number.prototype.round = function(places){
    places = Math.pow(10, places); 
    return Math.round(this * places)/places;
}

var yournum = 10.55555;
yournum = yournum.round(2);
share|improve this answer

it may work for you,

Math.round(num * 100)/100;

to know the difference between toFixed and round, you can have a look at this link

Javascript functions Math.round(num) vs num.toFixed(0) and browser inconsistencies

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Math.round(yourValue * 100) / 100
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To not deal with many 0s, use this variant:

Math.round(num * 1e2) / 1e2
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If you happen to already be using the d3 library, they have a powerful number formatting library: https://github.com/mbostock/d3/wiki/Formatting

Rounding specifically is here: https://github.com/mbostock/d3/wiki/Formatting#d3_round

In your case, the answer is:

> d3.round(1.777777, 2)
1.78
> d3.round(1.7, 2)
1.7
> d3.round(1, 2)
1
share|improve this answer
2  
Looking at the source, this is nothing more than a generalized version of @ustasb answer, using num * Math.pow(n) instead of num * 100 (but it's definitely a neat one-liner ;-) –  swordofpain Jun 18 at 14:23
    
But documented, and, being in a library, I don't have the same need to check browser compatibility BS. –  Scott Stafford Jun 19 at 18:11
    
using Math.pow(n) allows for d3.round(12, -1) == 10 –  daviestar Aug 5 at 9:25

This may help you:

var result = (Math.round(input*100)/100);

for more information, you can have a look at this link

Javascript functions Math.round(num) vs num.toFixed(0) and browser inconsistencies

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Try to use JQuery.number plug-in.

var number = 19.8000000007;
var res = 1 * $.number(number, 2);
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I wrote for self this set of functions. May be, it will help you too.

function float_exponent(number) {
    exponent = 1;
    while (number < 1.0) {
        exponent += 1
        number *= 10
    }
    return exponent;
}
function format_float(number, extra_precision) {
    precision = float_exponent(number) + (extra_precision || 0)
    return number.toFixed(precision).split(/\.?0+$/)[0]
}

Usage:

format_float(1.01); // 1
format_float(1.06); // 1.1
format_float(0.126); // 0.13
format_float(0.000189); // 0.00019

For you case:

format_float(10, 1); // 10
format_float(9.1, 1); // 9.1
format_float(1.77777, 1); // 1.78
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A precise rounding method : Source - https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Math/round

(function(){

    /**
     * Decimal adjustment of a number.
     *
     * @param   {String}    type    The type of adjustment.
     * @param   {Number}    value   The number.
     * @param   {Integer}   exp     The exponent (the 10 logarithm of the adjustment base).
     * @returns {Number}            The adjusted value.
     */
    function decimalAdjust(type, value, exp) {
        // If the exp is undefined or zero...
        if (typeof exp === 'undefined' || +exp === 0) {
            return Math[type](value);
        }
        value = +value;
        exp = +exp;
        // If the value is not a number or the exp is not an integer...
        if (isNaN(value) || !(typeof exp === 'number' && exp % 1 === 0)) {
            return NaN;
        }
        // Shift
        value = value.toString().split('e');
        value = Math[type](+(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] - exp) : -exp)));
        // Shift back
        value = value.toString().split('e');
        return +(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] + exp) : exp));
    }

    // Decimal round
    if (!Math.round10) {
        Math.round10 = function(value, exp) {
            return decimalAdjust('round', value, exp);
        };
    }
    // Decimal floor
    if (!Math.floor10) {
        Math.floor10 = function(value, exp) {
            return decimalAdjust('floor', value, exp);
        };
    }
    // Decimal ceil
    if (!Math.ceil10) {
        Math.ceil10 = function(value, exp) {
            return decimalAdjust('ceil', value, exp);
        };
    }

})();

// Round
Math.round10(55.55, -1); // 55.6
Math.round10(55.549, -1); // 55.5
Math.round10(55, 1); // 60
Math.round10(54.9, 1); // 50
Math.round10(-55.55, -1); // -55.5
Math.round10(-55.551, -1); // -55.6
Math.round10(-55, 1); // -50
Math.round10(-55.1, 1); // -60
Math.round10(1.005, -2); // 1.01 -- compare this with Math.round(1.005*100)/100 above
// Floor
Math.floor10(55.59, -1); // 55.5
Math.floor10(59, 1); // 50
Math.floor10(-55.51, -1); // -55.6
Math.floor10(-51, 1); // -60
// Ceil
Math.ceil10(55.51, -1); // 55.6
Math.ceil10(51, 1); // 60
Math.ceil10(-55.59, -1); // -55.5
Math.ceil10(-59, 1); // -50
share|improve this answer

My crack at a solution:

function roundNumber(s,n){
    s=s+"";// change s to string in case s is passed as a number
    if(s.indexOf(".")>-1){
        if(s.split(".")[1].length>n){
            var s2=s.split(".")[1].split("");
            if(s2[n]>4){
                var i;
                for(i=n-1;i>-1;i--){
                    if(s2[i]!=9){
                        s2[i]=s2[i]*1+1+"";
                        break;
                    }else{
                        s2[i]="0";
                    }
                }
                s2.length=n;
                s2=s2.join("");
                if(i==-1){
                    s=s.split(".")[0];
                    s[0]!="-"?++s:--s;
                    s=s+"."+s2;
                }else{
                    s=s.split(".")[0]+"."+s2;
                }
            }else{
                s=s.substring(0,s.indexOf(".")+n+1);
            }
        }
    }
    return s*1;
}

where s is either a number, or a numeric string; and n is the number of digits after the decimal place to round the number to (can be 0).

The function is not 100% accurate if the first argument is a number of 17 digits or higher. This is because web browsers appear to be designed to automatically round the large number to something smaller, when passed to a function. Therefore, when working with such large numbers, s should be given a numeric string for absolute accuracy.

Example:

roundNumber(1.0049999999999999,2) //returns 1.01, NOT 1
roundNumber("1.0049999999999999",2) //returns 1

This is perhaps not the fastest way of rounding numbers, but it meets the requirements of the question's author:

roundNumber(10,2) //returns 10
roundNumber(1.7777777,2) //returns 1.78
roundNumber(9.1,2) //returns 9.1
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Here is function i came up to do "round up". I used double Math.round to compensate javascript inaccurate multiplying, so 1.005 will be correctly rounded as 1.01.

function myRound(number, decimalplaces ){
    if(decimalplaces > 0){
        var multiply1 = Math.pow(10,(decimalplaces + 4));
        var divide1 = Math.pow(10, decimalplaces);
        return Math.round( Math.round(number * multiply1)/10000 )/divide1 ;
    }
    if(decimalplaces < 0){
        var divide2 = Math.pow(10, Math.abs(decimalplaces));
        var multiply2 = Math.pow(10, Math.abs(decimalplaces));
        return Math.round( Math.round(number / divide2) * multiply2 );
    }
    return Math.round(number);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Did you actually try using this function? It doesn’t take into account any decimal places, because you round the number again. –  minitech Aug 17 '13 at 15:11
    
I tested it again, and it works for me.. (alert( myRound(1234.56789, 2) ); //1234.57 ) May-be you get confused by multiple "return" statements? –  Andrei Sep 19 '13 at 6:18
    
An upvote as this maybe a long winded way of doing it but it works. –  Ash May 26 at 10:52

I still don't think anyone gave him the answer to how to only do the rounding if needed. The easiest way I see to do it is to check if there is even a decimal in the number, like so:

var num = 3.21;
if (num.indexOf('.') >= 0) {
    // whatever code you decide to use to round
}
share|improve this answer
1  
indexOf is not a method on numbers, first of all. –  minitech Aug 17 '13 at 15:10
    
The Question asked how to round numbers not just check if they need to be rounded. –  Jason Foglia Oct 14 '13 at 18:34

protected by minitech Aug 17 '13 at 15:11

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