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I'm parsing a file that may have a date in it. If the date is there, it's formatted with EITHER a two digit or four digit year, but always with slashes (e.g., MM/DD/YY or MM/DD/YYYY).

public class T2 {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        inputLine = "foo foo foo foo foo 10/26/2013 bar bar bar bar bar";

        if(inputLine.indexOf("/")>0) {                       // if date exists
            taskDateSOF = (inputLine.indexOf("/")-2);        // then start of field is first instance of / minus two
            if (inputLine.lastIndexOf.isNumeric("/")+3); {         //    and if there's a number in the third position after the last /
                taskDateEOF = (inputLine.lastIndexOf("/") + 4);     //    the the end of date field is last instance of / +4
            else                                                  // <<< this "else" give an "else without if compiler error 
                taskDateEOF = (inputLine.lastIndexOf(("/" + 2)));      // else it's the last instance of / +2
                taskDate = inputLine.trim().substring(taskDateSOF,taskDateEOF).trim(); }  //
            }
        else                                            
             taskDate = "00/00/0000";
        }
            System.out.println(taskDate+" "+inputLine);
    }
}

after struggling a bit, I realize that I've never nested if statements like this before, and I'm having trouble deciphering the error. The else at line 9 (first one) is giving me an else without if error during the compile. I suspect I've got a misplaced curlybrace somewhere, though it seems to be OK based on the sample code and tutorials I've referenced. I can't spot the problem, and none of my "try it and see what happens" experiments have been successful. Can someone point me to what I'm not seeing?

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1  
I think your code is so complex that you confused yourself. I would recommend using one regexp to isolate the date (matching 2 or 4-digit year). If you want to keep the logic as it is, try using blank lines to group your code according to what you want it to accomplish. Use shorter lines if possible. Follow a consistent code formatting policy on where you place your brackets. – theglauber Aug 6 '12 at 18:04
up vote 7 down vote accepted

This won't compile to start with:

if (inputLine.lastIndexOf.isNumeric("/")+3);

That's wrong in all kinds of ways - it's not even clear to me what you mean. lastIndexOf is a method call - why are you using it like a field? What are you trying to add 3 to? When do you want the condition to evaluate to true?

Then your if/else syntax is wrong. You should generally be using:

if (condition) {
    // Code
} else {
    // Code
}

Instead, you've got:

if (condition); {
   // Code
else
   // Code
}

Note the extra semi-colon you've got and the bad bracing. The point is to specify:

  • A condition
  • A block of code to execute if the condition is true
  • A block of code to execute otherwise

Each of those blocks needs to be within { } unless it's a single statement.

While you can get away without braces in some cases, it's generally better to always use them. There's less room for error then, when you change a single-statement body to a multiple-statement body.

share|improve this answer
    
@Jon - that's why I've documented my code... ;) if (inputLine.lastIndexOf.isNumeric("/")+3); // and if there's a number in the third position after the last the date can end in either /12 or /2012. So I'm evaluating if the third byte past the '/' is numeric (as in the /2012) to drive whether this date is a two or four digit year. While it's not thrown any compiler errors, yor horror at the statement tells me I'd better re-write it; that's underway. – dwwilson66 Aug 6 '12 at 18:04
    
@dwwilson66: You're really not evaluating that in any sensible fashion, nor is it clear why you expect that code to do what you mean. If you're not getting a compilation error then you're not compiling the code you've shown. That code will not compile. I'm absolutely certain of that. – Jon Skeet Aug 6 '12 at 18:05
    
@JonSkeet - Now...for the if...else. So, I need to use the second opening curly brace even if I'm not using an if? I was under the impression that if (condition) { was the only open curly brace allowed. Thanks for clarifying that, and thanks for the generic examples! – dwwilson66 Aug 6 '12 at 18:06
    
@dwwilson66: No, you need curly braces around each block. I'm not sure what you mean by "even if I'm not using an if" - but I suggest you experiment with very simple conditions. If you're having trouble with this sort of syntax, it's worth taking a step back and writing simple console apps to play with the language, rather than focusing on real tasks which will obviously be more complex. – Jon Skeet Aug 6 '12 at 18:07

You have a semicolon after your if statement's condition, which effectively terminates the body of the if statement.

if (inputLine.lastIndexOf.isNumeric("/")+3)/*;*/

Furthermore, what type of object is inputLine? It doesn't appear to be declared with a type. I assume String, in which case there is no field called "lastIndexOf".

The if-without-else is one of several problems with your code. I recommend looking at other code examples to learn Java syntax.

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As @theglauber said, it looks much easier to parse such kind of input with regex.

String inputLine = "foo foo foo foo foo 10/26/2013 bar bar bar bar bar";
Pattern p = Pattern.compile(".*(\\d{2}\\/\\d{2}\\/\\d{4}).*");
Matcher m = p.matcher(inputLine);
if (m.matches()) {
    String taskDate = m.group(1);
    System.out.println(taskDate + " " + inputLine);
}

Furthermore, this if-then if-then-else Java tutorial might help you. If you go with regex, then read this.

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Well. You're lacking curly braces in your code aside from the extra semicolon, you have this:

if (inputLine.lastIndexOf.isNumeric("/")+3); {         //    and if there's a number in the third position after the last /
    taskDateEOF = (inputLine.lastIndexOf("/") + 4);     //    the the end of date field is last instance of / +4
else                                                  // <<< this "else" give an "else without if compiler error 
    taskDateEOF = (inputLine.lastIndexOf(("/" + 2)));      // else it's the last instance of / +2
    taskDate = inputLine.trim().substring(taskDateSOF,taskDateEOF).trim(); }  //
}

when you should have this:

if (inputLine.lastIndexOf.isNumeric("/")+3) {         //    and if there's a number in the third position after the last /
    taskDateEOF = (inputLine.lastIndexOf("/") + 4);     //    the the end of date field is last instance of / +4
} else {                                                  // <<< this "else" give an "else without if compiler error 
    taskDateEOF = (inputLine.lastIndexOf(("/" + 2)));      // else it's the last instance of / +2
    taskDate = inputLine.trim().substring(taskDateSOF,taskDateEOF).trim();  //
}

One way to know if you have unclosed curly braces or parentheses is using a text editor (like Notepad++) or an IDE (like Netbeans) that highlights where your opened curly braces end. But being honest you seem to lack basic understanding of Java programming, so i recommend you to read a book about the language (like the Deitel's How to program or similar) to get the basics of it.

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