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I am making a program that auto-runs using windows scheduler. What I'd like to do is set the program to run on the 1st and the 16th of every month. If the program run's on the 1st. I'd like to have the query run for last month... For example if today was the first of august I would want it to run 7/1/12 - 7/31/12. If I run the program on the 16th I want it to run the query for the current month to the 15th. For example if it were 8/16, I would want the program to run the query for 8/1/12 - 8/15/12. What is the best way to accomplish this? Do I go with 2 seperate programs with the query attaching it to the correct date range? One scheduled to run on the first of every month, and one on the 16th? How would I go about getting the date range and the year as it will depend on which month/year it is run... My query is:

SELECT        Store_Number, Invoice_Number, Invoice_Date, Extended_Price, Warranty_Amount, Quantity_Sold, Invoice_Detail_Code
FROM            Invoice_Detail_Tb
WHERE        (Warranty_Amount > 0) AND (Invoice_Date BETWEEN CONVERT(DATETIME, '2012-08-01 00:00:00', 102) AND CONVERT(DATETIME, '2012-08-05 00:00:00', 102))
ORDER BY Store_Number, Invoice_Date
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you have your query in a view, you might use this:

where
    Invoice_Date between
    (
        case
            when datepart(dd, getdate()) = 1 then dateadd(mm, -1, getdate())
            else dateadd(dd, -15, getdate())
        end
    )
    and
    (
        case
            when datepart(dd, getdate()) = 1 then dateadd(dd, -1, getdate())
            else dateadd(dd, -1, getdate())
        end
    )

UPDATE: Ignoring the time

(I know it looks ugly.)

where
    Invoice_Date between
    (
        case
            when datepart(dd, dateadd(dd, datediff(dd, 0, getdate()), 0)) = 1 then dateadd(mm, -1, dateadd(dd, datediff(dd, 0, getdate()), 0))
            else dateadd(dd, -15, dateadd(dd, datediff(dd, 0, getdate()), 0))
        end
    )
    and
    (
        case
            when datepart(dd, dateadd(dd, datediff(dd, 0, getdate()), 0)) = 1 then dateadd(dd, -1, dateadd(dd, datediff(dd, 0, getdate()), 0))
            else dateadd(dd, -1, dateadd(dd, datediff(dd, 0, getdate()), 0))
        end
    )
share|improve this answer
    
The question is.. Where does it get the date from? Is it from the SQL Server? Or does it get the date from the PC running the query? – Shmewnix Aug 6 '12 at 18:46
    
It is definitely coming from the server. I ran it on my machine and it shows a time off by 25 seconds. – Farhan Aug 6 '12 at 18:59
    
This is Great! The only problem is it's not pulling anything for the first date. So for example, I changed the date to 7/1. so it should run for 6/1 - 6/30. It shows ALL records except the record on 6/1... any thoughts on this? – Shmewnix Aug 6 '12 at 19:02
    
If you are using SQL 2008, then you can cast all date related datatypes to DATE. Is the issue because it has time in it? – Farhan Aug 7 '12 at 16:42
1  
It's SQL 2000. The time associated with it is always 12:00AM, as the database is a snapshop database. We use it to pull reports and such, so the data is extracted every night but the time stamp is never an actual timestamp. If I run a query for 6/1 - 6/30 it returns the 6/1 result... but the above query does not. – Shmewnix Aug 7 '12 at 18:57

Try 8/1/2012 and 8/16/2012 as the date. It returns the values you want to see:

declare @date datetime = '8/16/2012', @start datetime, @end datetime

if datepart(dd, @date) = 1
begin
  set @start = dateadd(mm, -1, @date)
  set @end = dateadd(dd, -1, @date)
end
else
begin
  set @start = dateadd(dd, -15, @date)
  set @end = dateadd(dd, -1, @date)
end

select @start, @end

It would be fairly easy to adapt this so that it would dynamically calculate the correct start and end dates based on any input date -- so you could run it anytime during the month.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't understand the 'down-vote' either. Both answers were almost immediately down-voted... This does just what the OP asked for, including taking into account the year issue mentioned. – James L. Aug 6 '12 at 18:26
    
I agree, Both posts are helpful. I'm in the process of applying information from both. Will keep you posted. – Shmewnix Aug 6 '12 at 18:39
    
I'd be inclined to continue the if/else to explicitly check for the 16th and invoke RaIsError (The Sun God boo-boo.) if the date is not either the 1st or 16th. – HABO Aug 6 '12 at 19:28

This should be simple, let me throw some examples for you. I truly think this should be one scheduled task, not multiple ones. It is easier at the end of the day to point and look at one scheduled task (one procedure) then go digging up multiple procedures just to see what might have wen't wrong.

The task can be scheduled using the SQL Server Agent (under the jobs section). The job can point to one single stored procedure.

In the procedure you can do a simple if else if logic.

IF DAY(GetDate()) = 1 --code here

ELSE IF DAY(GETDATE()) = 16 --code here

DAY(date_expression) returns the day in a datetime column. Ironically there is a MONTH and YEAR function if you for some reason need those. The rest is simple, if you are on the first date of the month then perform the monthly query from months first date till next months first day - 1, this becomes:

SELECT DATEADD(s,-1,DATEADD(mm, DATEDIFF(m,0,GETDATE())+1,0))

Otherwise if it hits on the 16th, you can run on the first day until half of the month.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why was this downvoted, i provided some great hints to solve the solution. Anon downvoter care to speak? – JonH Aug 6 '12 at 18:22
    
+1 for DATEADD(s,-1,...) so the end date will include the time through 11:59:59 PM. – James L. Aug 6 '12 at 18:29
    
I agree, Both posts are helpful. I'm in the process of applying information from both. Will keep you posted. – Shmewnix Aug 6 '12 at 18:43
    
Using GetDate() within a query is chasing a moving target, impacts performance, and may produce curious results, e.g. as the date changes. It is almost always a better idea to capture the current date/time in a variable and then use that value as needed. This is more important across multiple statements as in a stored procedure. The most common reason to use GetDate() multiple times is when capturing the start and end times for a long running operation. – HABO Aug 6 '12 at 19:22
    
HABO I am using GetDate() for an example, you don't have to. – JonH Aug 6 '12 at 20:17

This is how I usually do something like that. Your stored procedure should look something like this:

declare
  @today  datetime ,
  @dtFrom datetime ,
  @dtThru datetime

------------------------------------------------------
-- get the current date, discarding the time component
------------------------------------------------------
set @today  = convert(datetime,convert(varchar,current_timestamp,112),112) -- get todays date, discarding the time component

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- determine the start/end dates of the query period.
--
-- if the query date (@today) is in the 1st half of the month (1st - 15th), the query range is the entire preceding month
-- if the query date (@today) is in the last half of the month (16 - 31st), the query range is the 1st of the current month up to the current date
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
if ( datepart(day) < 16 )
  begin
    set @dtThru = dateadd(day,   - datepart(day, @today  ) , @today  ) -- set the end   date to the last day of the previous  month
    set @dtFrom = dateadd(day, 1 - datepart(day, @dtThru ) , @dtThru ) -- set the start date to the first day of the previous month
  end
else
  begin
    set @dtfrom = dateadd(day, 1  - datepart(day, @today) , @today ) -- set the start date to the first day of the current month
    set @dtThru = @today
  end

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- finally, adjust the start/end times to cover the entire gamut of date/time values for the month
--
-- We don't have to modify @dtFrom at all: we know its time component is 00:00:00.000 already. However, we want
-- @dtThru to have a time component of 23:59:59.997, due to SQL Server's broken way of counting time -- any time value
-- higher than that (e.g., '23:59.59.999') is 'rounded up' to start-of-day (00:00.00.000), the next day. Brilliant!
--   
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
set @dtThru = dateadd(ms, -3 , dateadd(day,1,@dtThru) )

--------------------------------
-- return the data to the caller
--------------------------------
SELECT Store_Number        ,
       Invoice_Number      ,
       Invoice_Date        ,
       Extended_Price      ,
       Warranty_Amount     ,
       Quantity_Sold       ,
       Invoice_Detail_Code
FROM Invoice_Detail_Tb id
WHERE Warranty_Amount > 0
  AND Invoice_Date BETWEEN @dtFrom AND @dtThru
ORDER BY Store_Number ,
         Invoice_Date

If you aren't using a stored procedure, you can accomplish the same thing with a parameterized query. Compute the two DateTime values needed. Put placeholders in your select statement ('@dtFrom' and '@dtThru'). When you execute the query, pass in your two DateTime values as SqlParameter objects with names matching the placeholders.

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