Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a client/server relationship that is meant to push data back and forth for an indeterminate amount of time.

The problem I'm attempting to overcome is on the client side, being that I cannot manage to find a way to detect a disconnect.

I've taken a couple of passes at other peoples solutions, ranging from just catching IO Exceptions, to polling the socket on all three SelectModes. I've also tried using a combination of a poll, with a check on the 'Available' field of the socket.

// Something like this
Boolean IsConnected()
{
    try
    {
        bool part1 = this.Connection.Client.Poll(1000, SelectMode.SelectRead);
        bool part2 = (this.Connection.Client.Available == 0);

        if (part1 & part2)
        {
            // Never Occurs
            //connection is closed
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
    catch( IOException e )
    {
        // Never Occurs Either
    }
}

On the server side, an attempt to write an 'empty' character ( \0 ) to the client forces an IO Exception and the server can detect that the client has disconnected ( pretty easy gig ).

On the client side, the same operation yields no exception.

// Something like this
Boolean IsConnected( )
{
    try
    {

        this.WriteHandle.WriteLine("\0");
        this.WriteHandle.Flush();
        return true;
    }
    catch( IOException e )
    {
        // Never occurs
        this.OnClosed("Yo socket sux");
        return false;
    }
}

A problem that I believe I am having in detecting a disconnect via a poll, is that I can fairly easily encounter a false on a SelectRead, if my server hasn't yet written anything back to the client since the last check... Not sure what to do here, I've chased down every option to make this detection that I can find and nothing has been 100% for me, and ultimately my goal here is to detect a server (or connection) failure, inform the client, wait to reconnect, etc. So I am sure you can imagine that this is an integral piece.

Appreciate anyone's suggestions. Thanks ahead of time.

EDIT: Anyone viewing this question should note the answer below, and my FINAL Comments on it. I've elaborated on how I overcame this problem, but have yet to make a 'Q&A' style post.

share|improve this question
    
Just catch IOExceptions, and use a read timeout. You don't need all this other malarkey. –  EJP Aug 6 '12 at 23:23
    
I've tried that already ( incase you didn't really read my post... ) and it's hit or miss. A read operation timing out after a second causes an IO, which would force a disconnect... But what if I just haven't received data...? –  DigitalJedi805 Aug 7 '12 at 1:37
    
I read your post. It isn't 'hit and miss', it is subject to asynchronous data buffering both locally and remotely. You won't get an exception on the first write to a failed connection, as it hasn't been detected yet: you will get it on a subsequent write, after TCP has timed out the retry attempts. –  EJP Aug 7 '12 at 4:34
    
Sorry to say I strongly disagree. I can Fraps a Debug session if you would like... –  DigitalJedi805 Aug 7 '12 at 15:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One option is to use TCP keep alive packets. You turn them on with a call to Socket.IOControl(). Only annoying bit is that it takes a byte array as input, so you have to convert your data to an array of bytes to pass in. Here's an example using a 10000ms keep alive with a 1000ms retry:

Socket socket; //Make a good socket before calling the rest of the code.
int size = sizeof(UInt32);
UInt32 on = 1;
UInt32 keepAliveInterval = 10000; //Send a packet once every 10 seconds.
UInt32 retryInterval = 1000; //If no response, resend every second.
byte[] inArray = new byte[size * 3];
Array.Copy(BitConverter.GetBytes(on), 0, inArray, 0, size);
Array.Copy(BitConverter.GetBytes(keepAliveInterval), 0, inArray, size, size);
Array.Copy(BitConverter.GetBytes(retryInterval), 0, inArray, size * 2, size);
socket.IOControl(IOControlCode.KeepAliveValues, inArray, null);

Keep alive packets are sent only when you aren't sending other data, so every time you send data, the 10000ms timer is reset.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thanks Joel, I'll be sure to give that a spin as soon as I hit my Dev system. –  DigitalJedi805 Aug 7 '12 at 1:38
    
Hey Joel, so I think I get the idea here but please correct me if Im wrong; The IOControl method puts a timed delivery of a 'KeepAlive' packet on a socket. I added ( almost word for word ) the above code to both my SocketServer.Client, and SocketClient constructors. I reduced the timer down to a second ( since that's the timeout on my 'read' on both sides? ) but my StreamReader.ReadLine ( Just realized as Im typing this that this shouldnt be my strategy ) never catches any data... I must say that I'm not sure exactly why we're putting what we're putting into the array; can I line-terminate it? –  DigitalJedi805 Aug 7 '12 at 16:10
    
Actually just tried running the same thing with a StreamReader.Read call, and still never got anything in either direction. Might be that I don't fully understand the concept. –  DigitalJedi805 Aug 7 '12 at 16:14
    
@DigitalJedi805 - I'm reasonably certain the keep alive is eaten before you ever see anything. To test it, run your apps on different machines and run wireshark to look at the data. You should see the keep alive go out and a reply come back (if everything is connected), but your read() call won't see anything. –  Joel Rondeau Aug 7 '12 at 16:20
1  
@Carlos That is correct. When using this, it isn't necessary to call SetSocketOption(). –  Joel Rondeau Nov 6 at 19:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.