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I am using predefined objects nested inside static class to store objects information at single place, and later i used them after some logic to populate normal objects with properties of predefined object.

What will you say that this approach is fine or I can achieve the same by some other efficient and better way?

//Example of storing predefined objects

 public static class RegistrationGift
    {
        public class InvitedRegistrationGift
        {
            public const int Token = 5;
            public const int Dollar = 0;

        }
    }

//how it will be used to populate credit entity (conversion)

Credit credit = new Credit();
credit.Token = RegistrationGift.InvitedRegistrationGift.Token;  

// and so on
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I say that this is strange. I don't get it. what's the point? why not simply create an instance of InvitedRegistrationGift? –  devundef Aug 6 '12 at 19:01
    
the intent is to only store the invitedregistrationgift at single place, and in future whenever i need to make change let say in token, i can do it at one place. –  aamir sajjad Aug 6 '12 at 19:06
    
but you have only one gift for the entire asp.net app? –  devundef Aug 6 '12 at 19:07
    
true. okay let say i am using it at multiple locations, then i need to go to each location and update it. by using this approach i need to change only at one place –  aamir sajjad Aug 6 '12 at 19:11
    
Ok, so you use the static classes as config stores? Let's say that your token is 'xyz', then after some time it changes to 'cxd'. You then use the InvitedRegistrationGift to store some configurations about the token but the token is valid for the application itself, not for the user... ok ok... –  devundef Aug 6 '12 at 19:15
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using static classes will not bring major problems, however the singleton pattern may fits better in this case.

public class RegistrationConfig {
   // private static instance
   private static RegistrationConfig _instance = new RegistrationConfig()

   // private constructor prevents the class from being instantiated from outside
   private RegistrationConfig() { }

   // instance public accessor
   public static RegistrationConfig Current { get { return _instance; } }

   public int InvitationToken { get; set; }
   public int InvitationDollar { get;set; }
}

Consuming:

var credit = new Credit();
credit.Token = RegistrationConfig.Current.InvitationToken;

A variation of this is not to implement the singleton pattern, but keep the .Current accessor and define a public setter, so you can change the active config.

public class RegistrationConfig {
   // current
   private static RegistrationConfig _current;

   // instance public accessor
   public static RegistrationConfig Current { get { return _current; } }

   // public setter
   public static void SetCurrent(RegistrationConfig current)
   {
       _current = current;
   }

   public int InvitationToken { get; set; }
   public int InvitationDollar { get;set; }
}

Then, on the app startup you set the config.

RegistrationConfig.SetCurrent(new RegistrationConfig() { ... });

And consume:

credit.Token = RegistrationConfig.Current.InvitationToken;

The advantage is that you can create instances with predefined values ​​to use, for example, in unit tests.

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This feels similar enough to the object-oriented design pattern known as Prototype. Since you're using C#, you might want to have your Credit object implement the ICloneable interface and return a clone of the prototypical object you've defined to populate the credit entry.

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I would lean towards abstraction with this because it looks as though he needs to force reference values which is not possible with an interface based inheritance. –  Wesley Aug 6 '12 at 22:15
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This seems like a scenario where abstraction would fit better.

Depending on the variety of implementations, I would do something like this:

abstract class Credit
{
   protected int Token; 
   protected int Dollar;
}

class InvitedRegistrationGift : Credit
{
   public override int Token
   {
       get 
       {
           return 5;
       }
   }
}

Credit credit = new InvitedRegistrationGift();
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