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I've looked at before(), append() and wrap(). None are quite what I need.

A pseudo-explanation of what I'm trying to do:

I'm processing a "list" of <div>s as selected by their class. If the .text() changes from one "row" to the next I want to insert (for example) <div class="wrapper">, when the .text() changes again I want to close the previous wrapper and then start a new one (</div><div class="wrapper">) and so on.

In the end, like "rows" (as based on .text()) would be wrapped together within a given <div class="wrapper">.

When I try to use any of the methods I've mentioned they each in some way force the closing tag. I want to add the div and then the closing tag myself. Seems like a pretty simple need but I can't seem to find a viable solution.

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why not just use spans? –  deltree Aug 6 '12 at 19:04

4 Answers 4

You can't.

Even if you don't close the tag, somehow injecting bad HTML, the browser will attempt to close it for you. Simply add more to the contents of the tag when needed.

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1  
I don't think you should say, 'You can't', as it's incredibly misleading. You should instead say, It's bad practice, and should be avoided where possible. –  Ohgodwhy Aug 6 '12 at 19:07
2  
@Ohgodwhy, Except that... you can't. It isn't possible. As my answer says, even if you were to try, the browser closes that tag for you. I don't think my answer is misleading at all. –  Brad Aug 6 '12 at 19:07
    
then see my answer with the jsfiddle? –  Ohgodwhy Aug 6 '12 at 19:09
2  
@Ohgodwhy: your answer doesn't do that at all. It concatenates a complete, working html string, using your DOM (which is pointless, you could do that using strings only) and then you add the complete HTML to your DOM. At no point is a broken element inserted to the DOM. –  David Hedlund Aug 6 '12 at 19:11
2  
@MichaelDurrant, You couldn't be more wrong, and neither could Ohgodwhy. Read his answer, and read my comment on it for an explanation. –  Brad Aug 6 '12 at 19:13

Simple answer is that you can't insert broken tags when you're working with the DOM. However, you can change your mentality. Instead of trying to add <div>, then adding </div><div> every so many elements, switch it up:

var $d = $('<div>').appendTo('#container');
$d.append(/*match*/);
$d.append(/*match*/);
$d.append(/*match*/);
$d = $('<div>').appendTo('#container');
$d.append(/*match*/);
$d.append(/*match*/);
$d.append(/*match*/);

and so-on. Basically, change your thinking process to move the elements in to the <div>, instead of wrapping the elements with <div> markup.

You can also keep a running tally, then reset your list on text changes (as you've described). e.g.

var matches = [],
    $d = $('div');
$d.each(function(){
    var $t = $(this);
    if(matches.length > 0 && $(matches[0]).text() != $t.text()){
        $('<div>',{'class':'wrapper'}).append(matches)
            .appendTo('body');
        matches = [];
    }
    matches.push(this);
});
if(matches.length > 0){
    $('<div>',{'class':'wrapper'}).append(matches)
        .appendTo('body');
}

Example of the above

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Thought on this fo a while before deciding -1. Question was how not to close at the same time not how to leave unclosed so this answer is for a slightly different question imho. –  Michael Durrant Aug 6 '12 at 19:15
    
@Brad Christie. Yes, that's it. Thanks. Funny, it hit me right after I posted the question. Is it just me, or does asking the question help one get the answer. However, and I asked this in my other comment above, how do I create a new wrapper on change in text() and switch from appending to the previous wrapper and using the new one. Is it just a matter of .append('div') and then chaining (?) onto that? (Obviously, I'm still learning. Pardon my slop use of vernacular etc.) –  Chief Alchemist Aug 6 '12 at 19:16
    
+1 for the right answer, and the correct way to do this. –  Brad Aug 6 '12 at 19:16
1  
@ChiefAlchemist: See the update I just posted; I also added a jsFiddle showing the grouping. However, give me a little bit to modify it to accommodate for your new comment. ;-) –  Brad Christie Aug 6 '12 at 19:20
2  
@MichaelDurrant: Though i agree about the question, I disagree with why you -1. If I asked "how to change the font color to red without using #F00,#FF0000,rgb(255,0,0)` "you can't" or "not possible" would be completely feasible. For that reason, asking how to leave an open-ended tag within HTML is not feasible, so I believe changing the approach is the only method remaining. –  Brad Christie Aug 6 '12 at 19:27

I am pretty sure that when you programatically add an element to the DOM - the element is fully created (both opened and closed).

If you want to be able to create a list and add the entries to it - use appendChild().

That will allow you to add the entries within the list.

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http://jsfiddle.net/XH2hp/

//can't form the tag normally, must use html entities.
$('div').append('&lt;p&gt;');//this is a non-closing <p> tag
$('div').append("Hey, I'm some text between two P tags. How does that work?!");
$('div').append('&lt;/p&gt;');//this is the closing </p> tag

//In order for the the DOM to get updated with the proper markup, we must process the HTML entities, .text() will do that for us.
$('div').html($('div').text());
share|improve this answer
1  
Why oh why would you do this? This is no different than building raw HTML and adding it to the DOM later. Why manipulate the DOM so much? Waste of CPU. If you have to generate your HTML this way (and I don't recommend it, due to problems you'll have with data possibly getting interpreted as HTML), then do it in a var, and use it as a parameter to .html(). –  Brad Aug 6 '12 at 19:10
3  
Your first line of code isn't a non-closing <p> tag, it is the text representation of the code that would create a <p> tag. –  David Hedlund Aug 6 '12 at 19:13
1  
Why use a div's text to do this instead of a variable? –  Kevin B Aug 6 '12 at 19:13

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