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I'm reading a lot of data from three tables in an Access database ~2 million rows, maybe 100MB of text. I was using the following SELECT statement:

Class.forName("sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbcDriver");
String url = "jdbc:odbc:Driver={Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb, *.accdb)};DBQ=" + databaseLocation + databaseName +";selectMethod=cursor; READONLY=true; TYPE=FASTLOAD";

con = DriverManager.getConnection(url);

String SQL = "SELECT ADDRESS_MODEL.ADDR_LINE_1, ADDRESS_MODEL.ADDR_LINE_2, LOCALITIES.NAME, ADDRESS_MODEL.SECONDARY_LOCALITY, ADDRESS_MODEL.POST_TOWN, ADDRESS_MODEL.COUNTY, BUILDINGS.ED_ID FROM (ADDRESS_MODEL LEFT JOIN BUILDINGS ON ADDRESS_MODEL.BUILDING_ID = BUILDINGS.BUILDING_ID) LEFT JOIN LOCALITIES ON BUILDINGS.LOCALITY_ID = LOCALITIES.LOCALITY_ID WHERE BUILDINGS.COUNTY_ID = " + county_ID;

Statement stmt = con.createStatement();
ResultSet result = stmt.executeQuery(SQL);

This was taking a while (approx 2 mins) so I looked for ways to make it faster. I read about prepared statements and decided to try making one. Following various tutorials I put this together:

String SQL = "SELECT ADDRESS_MODEL.ADDR_LINE_1, ADDRESS_MODEL.ADDR_LINE_2, LOCALITIES.NAME, ADDRESS_MODEL.SECONDARY_LOCALITY, ADDRESS_MODEL.POST_TOWN, ADDRESS_MODEL.COUNTY, BUILDINGS.ED_ID FROM (ADDRESS_MODEL LEFT JOIN BUILDINGS ON ADDRESS_MODEL.BUILDING_ID = BUILDINGS.BUILDING_ID) LEFT JOIN LOCALITIES ON BUILDINGS.LOCALITY_ID = LOCALITIES.LOCALITY_ID WHERE BUILDINGS.COUNTY_ID = ?";

PreparedStatement prest = con.prepareStatement(SQL);
prest.setString(1, county_ID);

ResultSet result = prest.executeQuery();

It still works, but now it takes over 15 mins. I've had a good Google but I can't seem to spot what I'm doing wrong. Are prepared statements just not appropriate for my particular problem?

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How long does the query take if you run it directly against your database? –  JamesB Aug 6 '12 at 19:45
    
I do not have a specific recommendation, but I suggest that you investigate getting a better JDBC driver. –  Aaron Kurtzhals Aug 6 '12 at 19:50
    
@JamesB Almost literally no time. Less than a second. –  Russell Aug 6 '12 at 19:50
    
What happens if you remove the selectMethod, readonly and type parameters from your URL? –  JamesB Aug 6 '12 at 20:07
    
@Aaron Kurtzhals I'm not entirely sure what this means. I was under the impression that there was one JDBC:ODBC driver specifically made for talking to Access from Java. What alternatives are there? Edit: Oh boy... Ok having now looked into this it looks like there are tons of different ones. Can you tell from looking at my code which one I'm using? Or how do I find out? –  Russell Aug 6 '12 at 20:08

1 Answer 1

The main performance gain from using PreparedStatement is given when you want to execute the same query multiple times. The database constructs the query when the statement is prepared and then re-uses this every time the statement is executed to avoid overhead. If you're only executing the query once then it's likely you won't see any performance improvement from using PreparedStatement.

The main argument for using PreparedStatement is to protect against SQL injection

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Interesting. It seems I misunderstood. I thought an "execution of the query" was each time you retrieve a record, which in this case is very many times. If in fact this is only a single execution of the query then I can see why it wasn't any faster. –  Russell Aug 6 '12 at 19:54
    
@Russell If you're executing it many times in a loop, you want to create the PreparedStatement outside of the loop, and then just call PreparedStatement.setString() and PreparedStatement.executeQuery() inside the loop, as shown here. Is this what you're doing? –  Edd Aug 6 '12 at 20:02
    
@Edd I'm afraid I think I just misunderstood what you use PreparedStatements for. I only execute the query 25 times. I thought it was the large number of records read in that would be sped up, but it seems not. –  Russell Aug 6 '12 at 20:09

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