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I need a python program that starts with the list a=[1] and then changes it to be 2 then 3 ... then 5 then adds another element and the list becomes 1,1 then becomes 1,2, etc until it becomes 5,5 and adds another element and becomes 1,1,1 and keeps going until it has 11 elements equal to 5 so it ends with 5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5

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14  
Welcome to StackOverflow! We usually expect askers to show some effort to solve the problem themselves. What have you tried? –  David Robinson Aug 6 '12 at 20:17
    
Also, why not just start with the list of 11 5's (that is, [5] * 11)? Is something being done with each iteration of the list as it is being created? –  David Robinson Aug 6 '12 at 20:19
    
@DavidRobinson I think the list is basically just counting increments. First it adds an element with 1, then counts it up till 5, then adds the next element as 1, and so on. Not sure why though =P... –  Windle Aug 6 '12 at 20:21
3  
-1 This seems like a homework question; that's fine, but it's not at all in the spirit of the advice on asking homework questions. "Make a good faith attempt to solve the problem yourself first", "Ask about specific problems with your existing implementation" etc. –  supervacuo Aug 6 '12 at 20:25
4  
I can't help but be a little disappointed that so many people jumped to write a solution to a question that shows so little effort. –  David Robinson Aug 6 '12 at 20:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since this seems like a homework question, you're only going to get an answer that puts you on the right track.

It seems to me, that you want the following behavior:

[1]
[2]
[3]
[4]
[5]
[1,1]
[1,2]
[1,3]
[1,4]
[1,5]
[2,5]

So it seems like you're adding elements forward, but then incrementing them backwards.

I'd look up modular arithmetic, to see how you could make a incrementing backwards clear your list back to 1's.

Once you do that, consider the range of (x mod 4) + 1.

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from itertools import chain, product

n = range(1, 6)
for a in chain.from_iterable(product(n, repeat=i) for i in range(1, 12)):
    # do whatever you want to with a
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You can use a for loop together with itertools.product():

from itertools import product

for n in range(1, 12):
    for a in product(range(1, 6), repeat=n):
        # Do whatever you want to do for each of the tuples

This does not create a single list that is changed in every iteration, but rather creates a new tuple for each iteration.

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this does not seem what the OP wanted. –  Inbar Rose Aug 6 '12 at 20:24
3  
@InbarRose: Please read the original post again. Pay special attention to the fact that the list is supposed to be [1, 1] at some point. It never will be with your solution. –  Sven Marnach Aug 6 '12 at 20:25
    
@InbarRose: Also note that this is just a more readable version of F.J's answer – at least one other person interpreted the question the same way, and I'm rather confident we are right. –  Sven Marnach Aug 6 '12 at 20:26
    
you are so correct, i am horribly sorry. i must have missed that. –  Inbar Rose Aug 6 '12 at 20:26

this is a function that can receive this list at any state along its process and know how to handle it. sorry its a long answer, i wanted to provide as much help as i could. and i know the code is not the nicest is could be.

def growth(mylist):
    new = False
    i = 0
    mylist = [r for r in reversed(mylist)]
    while new is False:
        if mylist[i] < 5:
            mylist[i] += 1
            break
        elif i == len(mylist)-1:
            new = True
        else:
            i+=1
        if i >= len(mylist):
            break
    if new == True:
        mylist = [1 for r in xrange(len(mylist)+1)]
    mylist = [r for r in reversed(mylist)]
    return mylist

some testing:

#get at start:
a = [1]
print a
for i in xrange(10):
    a = growth(a)
    print a

result:

>>> 
[1]
[2]
[3]
[4]
[5]
[1, 1]
[1, 2]
[1, 3]
[1, 4]
[1, 5]
[2, 5]

and

print    
#get in middle:
a = [1,3]
print a
for i in xrange(10):
    a = growth(a)
    print a

result:

>>>
[1, 3]
[1, 4]
[1, 5]
[2, 5]
[3, 5]
[4, 5]
[5, 5]
[1, 1, 1]
[1, 1, 2]
[1, 1, 3]
[1, 1, 4]

and finally:

print
#get late:
a = [1,1,3,5]
print a
for i in xrange(10):
    a = growth(a)
    print a

result:

>>>
[1, 1, 3, 5]
[1, 1, 4, 5]
[1, 1, 5, 5]
[1, 2, 5, 5]
[1, 3, 5, 5]
[1, 4, 5, 5]
[1, 5, 5, 5]
[2, 5, 5, 5]
[3, 5, 5, 5]
[4, 5, 5, 5]
[5, 5, 5, 5]
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