Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Update: I know there are existing implementations of forEach method. The purpose of doing this is to learn and improve my Javascript skills.

I am trying to implement a forEach method for array objects. What I am doing is the following:

var list = ['one', 'two', 'three'];

function forEach(callback){
    for(var n = 0; n < this.length; n++){
        callback.call(this[n], n);
    }
};

list.forEach(function(index){
        console.log(index);
        console.log(this);
    }
);

I am not very good with javascript and I am trying to get better so I've been reading a little bit and I now know that if I do this kind of thing, the context of the "forEach" function would be the object which is calling it, in this case "list".

When this code runs I get the error: "Uncaught TypeError: Object one,two,three has no method 'forEach'".

What is it I am not understanding?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
3  
There is already a forEach method on Arrays... –  Bergi Aug 6 '12 at 20:53
1  
You did nothing to associate the function forEach with the forEach property of your list object. –  Raymond Chen Aug 6 '12 at 20:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think what you want to do is probably not to attach the foreach function to only the one array you have here, but to make it work for all arrays. To do that, you must edit the Array prototype (something that some people have very strong opinions about, because you can not protect against potential future namespace collisions - but other people find extremely useful). Once the Array.prototype object has a function added to it, you can call that function on any array. Like this:

var list = ['one', 'two', 'three'];

Array.prototype.myForEach = function(callback){
    for(var n = 0; n < this.length; n++){
        callback.call(this[n], n);
    }
};

list.myForEach(function(index){
    console.log(index);
    console.log(this);
});

*N.B. to avoid conflict with existing forEach functions (https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/forEach) I have named the function myForEach which I expect to be safe from conflict.

share|improve this answer
var list = ['one', 'two', 'three'];

list.forEach = function(callback){
    for(var n = 0; n < this.length; n++){
        callback.call(this[n], n);
    }
};

list.forEach(function(index){
        console.log(index);
        console.log(this);
    }
);​

It seems you are trying to make your own on that list object. If so you need to make it a property of that object.

share|improve this answer

I believe that you will need to define forEach before you instantiate the array.

Array.prototype.forEach = function (callback) {
    var n;
    for(n = 0; n < this.length; n++){
        callback.call(this[n], n);
    }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
No, you don't need to. JavaScript is dynamic. –  Bergi Aug 6 '12 at 21:01

You need to add the forEach method to the prototype of Arrays :

/*
* pay attention to the fact that if you use forEach aas method name you'll override
* the built default forEach method, try to use some prefix to distinguish between
* the built in methods and your own ones 
*/
Array.prototype.my_forEach = function(callback){ /* your code here */ };
share|improve this answer

You could set the context object (this keyword) by using call:

myForEach.call(list, function(index) { … });

An other possibility would be to call the function as a property of the list object:

list.myForEach = function(callback) { … };
list.myForEach(function(index) { … });

or enable this by adding it to the prototype of all Array objects:

Array.prototype.myForEach = function(callback) { … };
['one', 'two', 'three'].myForEach(function(index) { … });

Note: there should already be a forEach method on Arrays. Use the compatibilty shim from there for ancient browsers to provide exactly the same functionality.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.