Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to write a simple module to output a 14-bit number based on the value of four input signals. My attempt is shown below.

module select_size(
    input a,
    input b,
    input c,
    input d,
    output [13:0] size
);

    if (a) begin
        assign size = 14'h2222;
    end
    else begin
        if (b) begin
            assign size = 14'h1111;
        end
        else begin
            if (c) begin
                assign size = 14'h0777;
            end
            else begin
                assign size = 14'h0333;
            end
        end
    end

endmodule

Upon compilation, I receive the following error:

ERROR:HDLCompiler:44 - Line 67: c is not a constant

I don't understand why that particular if-statement isn't working if the other two preceding it are. I have tried changing the condition to

if (c == 1) begin

but to no avail.

Does anybody know how to solve this error? Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
The compiler thinks those are conditional generate items, not conditional statements. –  user597225 Aug 7 '12 at 3:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Two problems:

1) You need to put if statements inside an always block.

If you use verilog-2001, you can use

always @*
   if ....
   end
end

Otherwise specify all the inputs in the sensitivity list:

always @(a or b or c or d)
   if ....
   end
end


2) Constant assignments are not allowed inside if statements.

Remove the assign keyword from any statements inside the if block:

if (a) begin
    size = 14'h2222;
end

You will also have to declare size as a reg type.

However my preference would be to rewrite the entire module with conditional operator, I find it much preferrable to read. This following module achieves the same result:

module select_size(
    input a,
    input b,
    input c,
    input d,
    output [13:0] size
);

    assign size = a ? 14'h2222 :
                  b ? 14'h1111 :
                  c ? 14'h0777 : 
                      14'h0333 ;

endmodule
share|improve this answer
    
Implemented both (1) and (2), and it seems to work great. –  Evan W Aug 6 '12 at 22:06
    
Thank you! I went with always @(*) –  Evan W Aug 6 '12 at 22:06
    
Nested ternary assignments, very interesting. I'll give it a try. Thanks a bunch! –  Evan W Aug 6 '12 at 22:29

As @Tim has already answered, using reg types inside always blocks or wire with assign.

@Tim has also described the nested ternary assignments, while in the example are written very well, they are generally seen as bad practice. They imply a very long combinatorial path and can be hard to maintain. The combinatorial path may be optimised by synthesis which should imply a mux with optimised selection logic.

Easier to maintain code will have a lower cost of ownership, and as long as it does not lead to a larger synthesised design it is normally preferred.

My implementation would be to use a casez, (? are don't cares). I find the precedence of each value easier to see/debug.

module select_size(
  input a,
  input b,
  input c,
  input d,
  output logic [13:0] size //logic (SystemVerilog) or reg type
);

always @* begin
  casez ({a,b,c})
    3'b1?? : size = 14'h2222 ;
    3'b01? : size = 14'h1111 ;
    3'b001 : size = 14'h0777 ;
    3'b000 : size = 14'h0333 ;
    default: size = 'bx      ;
  endcase
end

endmodule
share|improve this answer
    
"they are generally seen as bad practice". Do you have any source for this claim? I don't believe that it would necessarily generate any worse path than the case statement, given even trivial compiler optimization. –  Tim Aug 8 '12 at 17:14
    
Also, while I know this is a trivial module, and somewhat of a design preference, in a more complex design I believe you should also add a default case which assigns the output to X. This is another reason why I prefer the ternary assignments, as if/else and case statement can have dangerous implications for X-Propagation in verification if you're not careful. If you simulate this and a/b/c/d are X, then the ternary assignment will propagate X to the output (ideal), the if/else will output 14'h0333, and the casez statement will latch the previous value since it has no default statement. –  Tim Aug 9 '12 at 1:16
    
Generally bad practise, Every code review I have had/given. Company coding guide lines. My experience of maintenance on old code bases that use heavily nested ternary operators. Every one who mentors me has also made a point of avoiding them due to the headaches involved in debugging them when the do not work as expected. –  Morgan Aug 9 '12 at 8:03
    
The Swallowing X's is a problem for debugging, as suggested by @Tim I have added a default statement. –  Morgan Aug 9 '12 at 8:05
    
>"they are generally seen as bad practice". Do you have any source for this claim? Not sure my previous answer came across as intended. I have been influenced by the design preferences of those around me. In Ruby which also have the ternary operator I have seen in community code reviews that the use of nested operators obfuscated the code and lowered readability. For me it is a code readability issue. @Tim yours is the cleanest example of this I have seen, not every one is as careful with code formatting. –  Morgan Aug 9 '12 at 8:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.