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I have a Visual Studio 2008 C++ 03 application using STLPort 5.2.1 where I would like to use a custom std::filebuf implementation. For example:

class MyFileBuf : public std::filebuf
{
protected:
    virtual int_type sync()
    {
        // breakpoint here never fires
        return std::filebuf::sync();
    };

    virtual std::streamsize xsputn( const char_type* p, std::streamsize n )
    {
        // breakpoint here never fires
        return std::filebuf::xsputn( p, n );
    };

    virtual int_type overflow( int_type c = traits_type::eof() )
    {
        // breakpoint here never fires
        return std::filebuf::overflow( c );
    };
};

class MyFileStream : public std::ofstream
{
public:
    MyFileStream() : std::ofstream( new MyFileBuf() ) { clear(); };
    ~MyFileStream() { delete rdbuf(); };
};

int main()
{
    MyFileStream fs;
    fs.open( "test.txt" );
    fs << "this is a test" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Unfortunately, none of the members of MyFileBuf are ever called. If I step through the code, I see that the << operator goes to

stlpd_std::basic_streambuf<char,stlpd_std::char_traits<char> >::xsputn(const char* __s, long int __n)
stlpd_std::basic_streambuf<char,stlpd_std::char_traits<char> >::sputn(const char* __s, long int __n)
stlpd_std::basic_ostream<char,stlpd_std::char_traits<char> >::_M_put_nowiden(const char* __s)
stlpd_std::operator<<<stlpd_std::char_traits<char> >(stlpd_std::basic_ostream<char,stlpd_std::char_traits<char> >& , const char* __s )
main()

where I would expect the top of the callstack to be:

MyFileBuf::xsputn(const char* p, long int n)

The files are, however, written correctly. Can anybody help me understand where I am going wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
I'm surprised that compiles. ofstream does not have a constructor that takes a streambuf* argument. I can see no reason to derive MyFileStream from ofstream, just ostream would be fine. Can't really see a reason to derive MyFileBuf from filebuf either, again streambuf would be normal. Perhaps if you explain why you are trying to do it this way it would help. –  jahhaj Aug 6 '12 at 21:59
1  
Indeed, ofstream can't be constructed that way. Some STL libraries provide "extensions" that in the end just come back to haunt you when you least expect, like in this case. In this situation, calling init(new MyFileBuf); inside the constructor should perform the initialization properly. –  DanielKO Aug 6 '12 at 22:52
    
@DanielKO - You're right. I was unintentionally using STLPort extensions. When I turned those off I got the compile errors jahhaj predicted. –  PaulH Aug 7 '12 at 13:56
    
I've got it figured out, I think. If either of you care to post something in the answer box, I'll give the first poster the green check and the second a +1. –  PaulH Aug 7 '12 at 14:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks @jahhaj and @DanielKO for your help.

The solution appears to be something like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

class MyFileBuf : public std::filebuf
{
protected:
    virtual int_type sync()
    {
        return std::filebuf::sync();
    };

    virtual std::streamsize xsputn( const char_type* p, std::streamsize n )
    {
        return std::filebuf::xsputn( p, n );
    };

    virtual int_type overflow( int_type c = traits_type::eof() )
    {
        return std::filebuf::overflow( c );
    };
};

class MyFileStream : public std::ostream
{
public:
    MyFileStream() : std::ostream( 0 ) { init( &buf_ ); };
    MyFileStream( const char* filename, std::ios_base::openmode mode = std::ios_base::out )
        : std::ostream( 0 )
    {
        init( &buf_ );
        this->open( filename, mode );
    }

    bool is_open() const { return buf_.is_open(); };

    void close() { buf_.close(); };

    void open( const char* filename, std::ios_base::openmode mode = std::ios_base::out )
    {
        buf_.open( filename, mode );
    };

    std::filebuf* rdbuf() { return &buf_; };

private:
    MyFileBuf buf_;
};

int main()
{
    MyFileStream fs( "test.txt" );
    fs << "this is a test" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Example

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