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This is kind of a double-barreled question, but it's got me puzzled. I currently have the following code:

from __future__ import division
import math

function = int(raw_input("Type function no.: "))


if function == 1:
    a = float(raw_input ("Enter average speed: "))
    b = float(raw_input ("Enter length of path: "))
    answer= float(b)/a
    print "Answer=", float(answer),

elif function == 2:
    mass_kg = int(input("What is your mass in kilograms?" ))
    mass_stone = mass_kg * 2.2 / 14
    print "You weigh", mass_stone, "stone."

else: print "Please enter a function number."

Now, I'd like to have some kind of loop (I'm guessing it's a for loop, but I'm not entirely sure) so that after a function has been completed, it'll return to the top, so the user can enter a new function number and do a different equation. How would I do this? I've been trying to think of ways for the past half hour, but nothing's come up.

Try to ignore any messiness in the code... It needs some cleaning up.

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4  
Have you tried just using while True: and letting the user hit ctrl-c when finished? –  kojiro Aug 6 '12 at 22:41
2  
@kojiro Or there could be a break if function == 3 or whatever –  gcochard Aug 6 '12 at 22:42
    
@kojiro I like keeping things automatic. :p –  dantdj Aug 6 '12 at 22:51
    
Note that under function == 1, a and b are both already floats, so there's no need for further conversion to floats in answer=b/a and print "Answer=", answer. –  chepner Aug 7 '12 at 1:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's better to use a while-loop to control the repetition, rather than a for-loop. This way the users aren't limited to a fixed number of repeats, they can continue as long as they want. In order to quit, users enter a value <= 0.

from __future__ import division
import math

function = int(raw_input("Type function no.: "))

while function > 0:
    if function == 1:
        a = float(raw_input ("Enter average speed: "))
        b = float(raw_input ("Enter length of path: "))
        answer = b/a
        print "Answer=", float(answer),
    elif function == 2:
        mass_kg = int(input("What is your mass in kilograms?" ))
        mass_stone = mass_kg * 2.2 / 14
        print "You weigh", mass_stone, "stone."

    print 'Enter a value <= 0 for function number to quit.'
    function = int(raw_input("Type function no.: "))

You can tweak this (e.g., the termination condition) as needed. For instance you could specify that 0 be the only termination value etc.

An alternative is a loop that runs "forever", and break if a specific function number is provided (in this example 0). Here's a skeleton/sketch of this approach:

    function = int(raw_input("Type function no.: "))

    while True:
       if function == 1:
          ...
       elif function == 2:
          ...
       elif function == 0:
          break      # terminate the loop.

      print 'Enter 0 for function number to quit.'
      function = int(raw_input("Type function no.: "))

Note: A for-loop is most appropriate if you are iterating a known/fixed number of times, for instance over a sequence (like a list), or if you want to limit the repeats in some way. In order to give your users more flexibility a while-loop is a better approach here.

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1  
Thanks a lot for the answer! I'll look into the while. Thanks for the skeleton. :) –  dantdj Aug 6 '12 at 22:52
1  
@Downvoter .. A downvote without explanation is not useful to anyone (OP, SO, or me) .. the code was tested and meets OPs requirements. If not, I am happy to correct errors or improve my answer but that requires some constructive feedback. –  Levon Aug 7 '12 at 0:00
    
There's a slight DRY violation w.r.t. raw_input here. I tend to prefer the while True/input/break pattern to avoid this. –  DSM Aug 7 '12 at 1:55
    
@DSM I am not familiar with the DRY term .. I too prefer the 2nd approach myself, but wanted to provide OP first with a solution for their original code. –  Levon Aug 7 '12 at 1:57
    
@Levon: "don't repeat yourself". If you use "while True" and put the function = int(etc) line at the start followed by the break, you don't have two copies of the function = int(etc). –  DSM Aug 7 '12 at 2:30

You simply need to wrap your entire script inside a loop, for example:

from __future__ import division
import math

for _ in range(10):

    function = int(raw_input("Type function no.: "))


    if function == 1:
        a = float(raw_input ("Enter average speed: "))
        b = float(raw_input ("Enter length of path: "))
        answer= float(b)/a
        print "Answer=", float(answer),

    elif function == 2:
        mass_kg = int(input("What is your mass in kilograms?" ))
        mass_stone = mass_kg * 2.2 / 14
        print "You weigh", mass_stone, "stone."

    else: print "Please enter a function number."

This will run your if statement 10 times in a row.

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Did the trick! Thank you. –  dantdj Aug 6 '12 at 22:50

I'd try this:

while True:
    function = ...
    if function == 0:
        break
    elif ...
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