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I can't seem to find anything that tells me if a port in my router is open or not. Is this even possible?

The code I have right now doesn't really seem to work...

private void ScanPort()
    {
        string hostname = "localhost";
        int portno = 9081;
        IPAddress ipa = (IPAddress) Dns.GetHostAddresses(hostname)[0];
        try
        {
            System.Net.Sockets.Socket sock =
                new System.Net.Sockets.Socket(System.Net.Sockets.AddressFamily.InterNetwork,
                                              System.Net.Sockets.SocketType.Stream,
                                              System.Net.Sockets.ProtocolType.Tcp);
            sock.Connect(ipa, portno);
            if (sock.Connected == true) // Port is in use and connection is successful
                MessageBox.Show("Port is Closed");
            sock.Close();

        }
        catch (System.Net.Sockets.SocketException ex)
        {
            if (ex.ErrorCode == 10061) // Port is unused and could not establish connection 
                MessageBox.Show("Port is Open!");
            else
                MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        }
    }
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How does it fail? Are the results not as you expected, are you getting an exception? –  TheEvilPenguin Aug 7 '12 at 0:08
    
also if your code connects to the port it should say port is open not closed –  Clinton Ward Aug 7 '12 at 0:26
    
@TheEvilPenguin I want it to say that my port is open because I forwarded it in my router, but it's failing to connect... –  FoxyShadoww Aug 7 '12 at 0:30

3 Answers 3

try this

                        TcpClient tcpClient = new TcpClient();
                        try
                        {
                                tcpClient.Connect("127.0.0.1", 9081);
                                Console.WriteLine("Port " + 9081+ " Open");
                        }
                        catch (Exception){

                                Console.WriteLine("Port " + 9081+ " Closed");
                        }

you should probably change 127.0.0.1 to something like 192.168.0.1 or what ever your routers ip address is

share|improve this answer
    
It still doesn't work if I use 192.168.1.1 –  FoxyShadoww Aug 7 '12 at 0:45
    
what happens when you try to use the code? –  Clinton Ward Aug 7 '12 at 1:56
    
It says that it can not connect even if the port is open. –  FoxyShadoww Aug 7 '12 at 14:12
    
that means nothing is listening on that port. Make sure your router is port forwarding to your pc and have a program open and listening on that port and it will connect. Also you should try to connect using your outside world address. Look up my ip in google and use that ip address. –  Clinton Ward Aug 7 '12 at 14:35
    
I did, but then again, is it possible to detect if that port is open without having a program that uses the port? –  FoxyShadoww Aug 7 '12 at 20:50

If you're connecting to the loopback adapterlocalhost or 127.0.0.1 (there's no place like 127.0.0.1!), you're unlikely to ever go out to the router. The OS is smart enough to recognize that it's a special address. Dunno if that holds true as well if you actually specify your machine's "real" IP address.

See also this question: What is the purpose of the Microsoft Loopback Adapter?

Also note that running traceroute localhost (tracert localhost in Windows) shows that the only network node involved is your own machine. The router is never involved.

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A port forward on the router cannot be tested from inside the LAN, you need to connect from the WAN (internet) side to see if a port forward is working or not.

Several internet sites offer services to check if a port is open:

What's My IP Port Scanner

GRC | ShieldsUP!

If you want to check with your own code, then you need to make sure the TCP/IP connection is rerouted via an external proxy or setup a tunnel. This has nothing to do with your code, it's basic networking 101.

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