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A while ago I had set up a site which used Express Checkout. I'd send the buyer's "shopping cart" to PayPal using this sort of code:

(for each item in the shopping basket):

$nvpstr = $nvpstr ."&L_PAYMENTREQUEST_0_NAME$key=$product[Name], $size[Size]";
$nvpstr = $nvpstr ."&L_PAYMENTREQUEST_0_NUMBER$key=$product[ID]";
$nvpstr = $nvpstr ."&L_PAYMENTREQUEST_0_DESC$key=$product[Description]";
$nvpstr = $nvpstr ."&L_PAYMENTREQUEST_0_AMT$key=$product[Price]";
$nvpstr = $nvpstr ."&L_PAYMENTREQUEST_0_QTY$key=$quantity";

However, I've decided to use Adaptive Payments, specifically chained payments. I've fully integrated it and it's working fine, but I haven't been able to send the item list to PayPal.

How would I do it with chained payments? The code above certainly doesn't work and I can't find any documentation about this.

Thanks for any help!

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Paypal has some developer site. I would always start asking there first. –  hakre Aug 7 '12 at 0:14

2 Answers 2

Here's the info from PayPal's adaptive payments page:

Adaptive Payments provides several kinds of payment: simple, parallel, and chained payments. You create each kind of payment with the Pay API.

  • Simple payments enable a sender to send a single payment to a single receiver. For example, your website can use an Adaptive Payments payment flow to transfer money resulting from a sale from your customer’s PayPal account to your own account. This is the traditional kind of payment.
  • Parallel payments enable a sender to send a single payment to multiple receivers. For example, your application might be a shopping cart that enables a buyer to pay for items from several merchants with one payment. Your shopping cart allocates the payment to merchants that actually provided the items. PayPal then deducts money from the sender’s account and deposits it in the receivers’ accounts.
  • Chained payments enable a sender to send a single payment to a primary receiver. The primary receiver keeps part of the payment and pays secondary receivers the remainder. For example, your application could be an online travel agency that handles bookings for airfare, hotel reservations, and car rentals. The sender sees only you as the primary receiver. You allocate the payment for your commission and the actual cost of services provided by other receivers. PayPal then deducts money from the sender’s account and deposits it in both your account and the secondary receivers’ accounts. Note: Chained payments also include delayed chained payments, in which payments to secondary receivers can be delayed for up to 90 days.

Looks like what you want is parallel payments. Here's some good information on parallel payments.

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This doesn't address the issue at all. –  Marek Jan 8 '14 at 11:27

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