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I've been playing around with the NIO and non-blocking sockets expecting to code a simple and high performant server where I could easily throttle the input data if and when the writing or the middle processing takes more time than it should. Unfortunately it seems I'm failing to understand some concepts of the select process.

Albeit I've seen some strange behaviors and have gone in cycles doing and redoing my code, there is one use case that fails all the time and that's the one I'm describing here - the case where I try to write more bytes than I read.

I've been trying to follow the patters from other examples, where the socket is either at READ or WRITE (but never both, and never none), and as soon as there are bytes to write, the socket switches to WRITE, writes as much as possible, and then switches back to READ.

From my debugging sessions what it looked like is that if I just write without any read, it gets into a point that the select never comes back (or comes only after several seconds) unless I force a read in between. Unfortunately at that point I do not want to read, as I have already too much data to process, so I tried to enable the read flag and read only one byte, but with too much traffic even that is not enough. The point where it hangs has no value related to the buffer sizes or the OS buffer sizes as far as I could see.

The sample contains 4 tests, test 1 returns the same amount of bytes and works, test 4 returns half of it, and obviously works, test 2 and 3 returns twice the input and fails miserably.

In this sample I don't even try to throttle the input (but log if the buffer or the queue fills up), so please help me and tell me what am I doing wrong.

To test it just dump any data into it like this:

cat /dev/zero | pv -bracN1 | nc ::1 8080 | pv -bracN2 > /dev/null 
    1:  338MB [  58MB/s] [56.3MB/s]
    2:  338MB [58.1MB/s] [56.3MB/s]

the sample code:

package com.example;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.InetSocketAddress;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.nio.ByteBuffer;
import java.nio.channels.SelectionKey;
import java.nio.channels.Selector;
import java.nio.channels.ServerSocketChannel;
import java.nio.channels.SocketChannel;
import java.nio.channels.spi.SelectorProvider;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.Set;
import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.Logger;

/** Socket Server Example. */
public class SocketServer {

    /**
     * @param args ignored.
     * @throws IOException exception.
     */
    public static void main(final String[] args) throws IOException {
        final SocketServer server = new SocketServer();
        assert server != null;
    }

    private static final Logger LOGGER = Logger.getLogger(SocketServer.class.getName());

    /** The {@link ServerSocketChannel} we're listening to. */
    private final ServerSocketChannel serverChannel;
    /** The {@link Selector}. */
    private final Selector mSelector;
    /** The set of write interests. */
    // it seems that it's recommended to not change interests with multiple threads
    // so multiple other examples uses this indirection where the other thread registers
    // a hint to write by adding the relevant information to a list/set/etc., and then
    // the main thread where the select runs is the one picking this data and calling
    // the key.interestOps(xxx).
    private final Set<SocketChannel> mWriteInterests = new HashSet<SocketChannel>();

    /** @throws IOException exception. */
    public SocketServer() throws IOException {
        super();
        // listen to all 8080, good enough for testing
        final InetSocketAddress addr = new InetSocketAddress(8080);
        // open the socket channel
        this.serverChannel = ServerSocketChannel.open();
        // set it to non-blocking
        this.serverChannel.configureBlocking(false);
        // get the real socket
        final ServerSocket socket = this.serverChannel.socket();
        // set the socket to reuse so it doesn't hang on time-wait when the app is restarted
        socket.setReuseAddress(true);
        // create a selector
        this.mSelector = SelectorProvider.provider().openSelector();
        // register the socket into the selector, for accepting new connections
        this.serverChannel.register(this.mSelector, SelectionKey.OP_ACCEPT);
        // finally bind it to the address
        socket.bind(addr);
        if (SocketServer.LOGGER.isLoggable(Level.INFO))
            SocketServer.LOGGER.log(Level.INFO, socket + " started");

        // now loop!
        Iterator<SelectionKey> selectedKeys;
        SelectionKey key;
        while (true) {
            // set sockets to write if requested
            // this indirection is to ensure that the key.interestOps is
            // *never* called from a different thread
            synchronized (this.mWriteInterests) {
                for (final SocketChannel change : this.mWriteInterests) {
                    // socket closed or invalid / null key may happen if
                    // the connection is closed inbetween the other thread
                    // pinging this and the selector cycling
                    if (!change.isOpen())
                        continue;
                    key = change.keyFor(this.mSelector);
                    if (key == null || !key.isValid())
                        continue;
                    key.interestOps(SelectionKey.OP_WRITE);
                }
                this.mWriteInterests.clear();
            }

            this.mSelector.select();

            selectedKeys = this.mSelector.selectedKeys().iterator();
            while (selectedKeys.hasNext()) {
                key = selectedKeys.next();
                selectedKeys.remove();
                if (!key.isValid())
                    continue;
                // it seems the key has only one interest (never read+write), so a elseif is better here
                if (key.isAcceptable())
                    this.accept(key);
                else if (key.isReadable())
                    this.read(key);
                else if (key.isWritable())
                    this.write(key);
            }
        }
    }

    private void accept(final SelectionKey key) throws IOException {
        // For an accept to be pending the channel must be a server socket channel.
        final ServerSocketChannel serverSocketChannel = (ServerSocketChannel) key.channel();

        // Accept the connection and make it non-blocking
        final SocketChannel socketChannel = serverSocketChannel.accept(); // IOException
        socketChannel.configureBlocking(false); // IOException
        // get the socket and set it to no delay (so small packets don't hang on the OS's buffers
        final Socket socket = socketChannel.socket();
        socket.setTcpNoDelay(true);
        socket.setKeepAlive(true);
        socket.setTrafficClass(0x08 | 0x10);

        final SocketControl socketControl = new SocketControl() {

            @SuppressWarnings("synthetic-access")
            @Override
            public void hintWrite() {
                SocketServer.this.hintWrite(socketChannel);
            }
        };

        // instead of a map of connections and workers, we attach the worker directly to the
        // key, thank you for the key.attach() api!
        final Worker worker = new Worker(socketControl);
        // Register the new SocketChannel with our Selector, indicating
        // we'd like to be notified when there's data waiting to be read
        socketChannel.register(this.mSelector, SelectionKey.OP_READ, worker);
    }

    private void hintWrite(final SocketChannel socket) {
        // only call the selector.wakeup once per cycle, kind of
        boolean changed;
        synchronized (this.mWriteInterests) {
            changed = this.mWriteInterests.add(socket);
        }
        if (changed)
            this.mSelector.wakeup();
    }

    private void read(final SelectionKey key) throws IOException {
        final SocketChannel socketChannel = (SocketChannel) key.channel();
        final Worker worker = ( (Worker) key.attachment() );
        final ByteBuffer buf = worker.getReadBuffer();
        if (buf.remaining() == 0)
            System.err.println("buffer full BAD BAD BAD!"); // XXX
        else {
            int numRead;
            try {
                numRead = socketChannel.read(buf);
            }
            catch (final IOException e) {
                this.disconnect(key);
                return;
            }
            if (numRead <= 0) {
                this.disconnect(key);
                return;
            }
            System.out.println("read " + numRead);
        }
        worker.parseReadBuffer();
    }

    private void write(final SelectionKey key) throws IOException {
        final SocketChannel socketChannel = (SocketChannel) key.channel();
        final Worker worker = ( (Worker) key.attachment() );
        int wrote = 0;
        ByteBuffer buf;
        try {
            // write all data until...
            while (true) {
                buf = worker.getWriteBuffer();
                if (buf == null || buf.remaining() == 0)
                    // ...no more data
                    break;
                wrote += socketChannel.write(buf);
                if (buf.remaining() > 0) {
                    // ... or the socket's buffer fills up
                    break;
                }
                //break;
            }
        }
        catch (final IOException e) {
            this.disconnect(key);
            return;
        }
        worker.parseWriteBuffer();
        // if no more data to write, switch it back to READ mode.
        if (buf == null || buf.remaining() == 0)
            key.interestOps(SelectionKey.OP_READ);
        System.out.println("wrote " + wrote + " hasmore=" + ( buf != null && buf.remaining() != 0 ));
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("static-method")
    private void disconnect(final SelectionKey key) throws IOException {
        final SocketChannel socketChannel = (SocketChannel) key.channel();
        final Worker worker = (Worker) key.attachment();
        worker.disconnected();
        key.attach(null);
        // The remote forcibly closed the connection, cancel
        // the selection key and close the channel.
        key.cancel();
        key.channel().close();
        if (SocketServer.LOGGER.isLoggable(Level.INFO))
            SocketServer.LOGGER.log(Level.INFO, "[" + socketChannel.socket().getRemoteSocketAddress() + "] Disconnected");
    }

    private static interface SocketControl {

        /**
         * Hint the selector that there are bytes to write.
         */
        void hintWrite();

    }

    private static class Worker {

        // the SocketControl to hint when there are bytes to write
        private final SocketControl mSocketControl;
        // queue of incoming data
        private final BlockingQueue<ByteBuffer> mQueueIn = new LinkedBlockingQueue<ByteBuffer>(1024);
        // queue of outgoing data
        private final BlockingQueue<ByteBuffer> mQueueOut = new LinkedBlockingQueue<ByteBuffer>(1024);
        // buffer for incoming data
        private final ByteBuffer mReadBuf = ByteBuffer.allocate(8192);
        // holder for outgoing data
        private ByteBuffer mWriteBuf;
        // thread for doing something with the data
        private Thread mThread;

        Worker(final SocketControl socketControl) {
            super();
            this.mSocketControl = socketControl;
            final Runnable r = new Runnable() {

                private final int test = 3;

                @SuppressWarnings("synthetic-access")
                @Override
                public void run() {
                    while (true) {
                        try {
                            while (true) {
                                switch (this.test) {
                                    case 1: {
                                        // test case 1 simply writes back every incoming packet
                                        // expected and result values between 50 and 80MB/s in and out
                                        final ByteBuffer buf = Worker.this.mQueueIn.take();
                                        Worker.this.mQueueOut.put(buf);
                                        Worker.this.mSocketControl.hintWrite();
                                        break;
                                    }
                                    case 2: {
                                        // test case 2 writes back every incoming packet as a double-sized packet
                                        // expected values ?
                                        // result failed read and write
                                        final ByteBuffer buf = Worker.this.mQueueIn.take();
                                        final ByteBuffer buf2 = ByteBuffer.allocate(buf.remaining() * 2);
                                        buf2.put(buf);
                                        buf.flip();
                                        buf2.put(buf);
                                        buf2.flip();
                                        Worker.this.mQueueOut.put(buf2);
                                        Worker.this.mSocketControl.hintWrite();
                                        break;
                                    }
                                    case 3: {
                                        // test case 3 writes back every incoming packet as a two similar packets
                                        // expected values ?
                                        // result failed read and write
                                        final ByteBuffer buf = Worker.this.mQueueIn.take();
                                        final ByteBuffer buf2 = ByteBuffer.allocate(buf.remaining());
                                        buf2.put(buf);
                                        buf.flip();
                                        buf2.flip();
                                        Worker.this.mQueueOut.put(buf);
                                        Worker.this.mSocketControl.hintWrite();
                                        Worker.this.mQueueOut.put(buf2);
                                        Worker.this.mSocketControl.hintWrite();
                                        break;
                                    }
                                    case 4: {
                                        // test case 4 writes back every incoming packet as a half sized packets
                                        // expected and result values between 50 and 80MB/s in and exactly half out
                                        final ByteBuffer buf = Worker.this.mQueueIn.take();
                                        final ByteBuffer buf2 = ByteBuffer.allocate(buf.remaining() / 2);
                                        buf.limit(buf.remaining() / 2);
                                        buf2.put(buf);
                                        buf2.flip();
                                        Worker.this.mQueueOut.put(buf2);
                                        Worker.this.mSocketControl.hintWrite();
                                        break;
                                    }
                                }
                            }
                        }
                        catch (final Throwable t) {
                            if (t instanceof InterruptedException)
                                return;
                            t.printStackTrace();
                        }
                    }
                }
            };
            this.mThread = new Thread(r);
            this.mThread.start();
        }

        ByteBuffer getReadBuffer() {
            return this.mReadBuf;
        }

        void parseReadBuffer() {
            // skip until the whole incoming buffer if full
            // each read will increase the .position() until it reaches .limit()
            // which in this case is the same as .capacity, and hence remaining==0 
            // happens when position=limit=capacity
            if (this.mReadBuf.remaining() != 0)
                return;
            // flip switches position to 0 and limit to capacity, so we can read it
            this.mReadBuf.flip();
            // duplicate the bytebuffer
            final ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocate(this.mReadBuf.remaining());
            // this will set bb and readbuf to position=limit=capacity
            bb.put(this.mReadBuf);
            bb.flip(); // set position to 0 so later it can be read
            // put the new buffer into the incoming queue
            if (this.mQueueIn.offer(bb))
                // reset the buffer to read more data
                this.mReadBuf.clear();
            else
                // here we don't reset, hoping the next read cycle will skip with
                // the other BAD BAD error, but maybe the queue will have space to
                // fit it and the code above will be sucessful
                System.err.println("queue full BAD BAD BAD!"); // XXX
        }

        ByteBuffer getWriteBuffer() {
            // if the writeBuf is null or completely writen, pick a new one from the queue
            if (this.mWriteBuf == null || this.mWriteBuf.remaining() == 0)
                this.mWriteBuf = this.mQueueOut.poll();
            return this.mWriteBuf;
        }

        void parseWriteBuffer() {
            // noop
        }

        void disconnected() {
            synchronized (this.mThread) {
                this.mThread.interrupt();
            }
        }

    }

}
share|improve this question
    
IMHO 56 MB per second isn't very fast. If you want performance I suggest you try simplifying your design. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 7 '12 at 8:31
    
I'd love to hear any suggestions to simplify the design, as I can't seem to simplify any further. I mean this is even the simple version that reads chunks of data and writes them back, it gets way worse when I start processing those chunks (looking at headers like http, looking at chunks like http, splitting the messages inside, better buffering the output without compromising latency, etc.). I'm all for simplification. My moto is "the best code is the deleted code", so please do tell me what to cut here. –  Bruno D. Rodrigues Aug 7 '12 at 8:52
    
Have a look at my very long comment in the answers section. I hope you can see that in this model you can easily process the data in the ByteBuffer as you have a single thread per client. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 7 '12 at 9:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I know you want non-blocking NIO, but if you want a performant NIO server I would start with this as a base line if for no other reason than simplicity. Often the simplest is also the fastest.

package example.nio;

import java.io.Closeable;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.InetSocketAddress;
import java.nio.ByteBuffer;
import java.nio.channels.ServerSocketChannel;
import java.nio.channels.SocketChannel;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

public class NioEchoServer implements Runnable, Closeable {
    private final ExecutorService service = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
    private final ServerSocketChannel ssc;
    private volatile boolean closed = false;

    public NioEchoServer(int port) throws IOException {
        ssc = ServerSocketChannel.open();
        ssc.socket().setReuseAddress(true);
        ssc.bind(new InetSocketAddress(port));
        service.submit(this);
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        try {
            while (!closed) {
                SocketChannel sc = ssc.accept();
                service.submit(new EchoHandler(sc));
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            if (!closed)
                e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            closeQuietly(ssc);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void close() throws IOException {
        closed = true;
        service.shutdownNow();
        closeQuietly(ssc);
    }

    static void closeQuietly(Closeable closeable) {
        try {
            if (closeable != null) closeable.close();
        } catch (IOException ignored) {
        }
    }

    public int getPort() {
        return ssc.socket().getLocalPort();
    }

    static class EchoHandler implements Runnable {
        private final SocketChannel sc;

        public EchoHandler(SocketChannel sc) {
            this.sc = sc;
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(64 * 1024);
            try {
                while (!Thread.interrupted() && sc.read(bb) > 0) {
                    int len = bb.position();
                    bb.flip();
                    while (bb.remaining() > 0)
                       sc.write(bb);
                    // write everything a second time.
                    bb.position(0);
                    bb.limit(len);
                    while (bb.remaining() > 0)
                        sc.write(bb);

                    bb.clear();
                }
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } finally {
                System.out.println("Server disconnected");
                closeQuietly(sc);
            }
        }
    }
}

package example.nio;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.InetSocketAddress;
import java.nio.ByteBuffer;
import java.nio.channels.SocketChannel;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong;

public class NioEchoClient {
    public static void main(String... arg) throws IOException, InterruptedException {
        NioEchoServer nes = new NioEchoServer(0); // use a free port.
        final SocketChannel sc = SocketChannel.open(new InetSocketAddress("localhost", nes.getPort()));
        // send data for 2 seconds.
        long writeCount = 0;
        final AtomicLong readCount = new AtomicLong();
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        long end = start + 2000;
        Thread reader = new Thread(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(64 * 1024);
                bb.clear();
                int read;
                try {
                    while ((read = sc.read(bb)) > 0) {
                        bb.clear();
                        readCount.addAndGet(read);
                    }
                } catch (IOException ignored) {
                }
            }
        });
        reader.start();
        ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(64 * 1024);
        while (end > System.currentTimeMillis()) {
            bb.clear();
            int write = sc.write(bb);
            if (write < 0)
                throw new AssertionError("Unexpected disconnection?");
            writeCount += write;
        }
        sc.shutdownOutput();
        reader.join();
        long time = System.currentTimeMillis() - start;
        System.out.printf("Wrote: %,d bytes and read: %,d bytes in %,d ms%n",
                writeCount, readCount.get(), time);
        sc.close();
        nes.close();
    }
}

prints

Wrote: 186,318,848 bytes and read: 186,318,848 bytes in 2,001 ms

when I write twice as much as I read I get

Wrote: 118,161,408 bytes and read: 236,322,816 bytes in 2,002 ms
share|improve this answer
    
Do you use my client? –  Peter Lawrey Aug 7 '12 at 9:22
    
I have edited the server to send twice as much as it reads. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 7 '12 at 9:23
    
Wow now I'm even more confused. Albeit this code does produce more stable output values, it still shows a big difference when totalwrite<totalread or the oposite. your code as-is gives me this: Wrote: 1,319,108,608 bytes and read: 1,319,031,008 bytes in 2,001 ms If I write twice (the bb.flip+while twice) then I get this: Wrote: 196,870,144 bytes and read: 393,459,732 bytes in 2,001 ms This is "good" because finally I see the write throughput being double the input, and the values being aligned with my code (input=50-100MB), but the first case is weird, 600MB/s??? I now suspect netcat :( –  Bruno D. Rodrigues Aug 7 '12 at 9:28
    
On a fast Centos and Ubuntu system I have got around 1+ GB per second over loopback. (I don't have access to right now) Note: a 10 Gig-E network card can sustain 1 GB/s over a real network. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 7 '12 at 9:31
    
In a high performance environment you have to test your testing tools as well unfortunately. :} –  Peter Lawrey Aug 7 '12 at 9:34

A channel is writable when there is room in its socket send buffer, the one in the kernel whose size is controlled by setSendBufferSize(). It contains data that has been sent but not yet acknowledged by the peer. If it fills up it means that the peer's receive buffer is full, which in turn means that the peer isn't reading as fast as the local node is writing. This is the TCP 'window closed' condition, a form of self-throttling.

EDIT: There are several other commonly seen problem with your code.

  1. Closing a channel cancels all its keys. You don't need to do both. And cancelled keys are no longer reachable so you don't need to null its attachments either.

  2. You are disconnecting if you encounter a zero length read. All that means is there is no data currently ready to be read. It's not a reason to disconnect.

  3. It is possible for accept() to return null.

share|improve this answer
    
Just added the note that I'm measuring it via netcat and pv, where both tools can read and write much more data than the limits I've seen here, so the other peer is surely not the bottleneck. –  Bruno D. Rodrigues Aug 7 '12 at 0:19
    
isn't a socket bidirectional and the buffers completely independent? I understand that if netcat wouldn't ack fast enough, my writes would delay, but as that's surely not the case, would it make any sense that a socket.read would affect the socket.write by acknowledging the asks or something? that would be quite weird –  Bruno D. Rodrigues Aug 7 '12 at 0:21
    
@BrunoD.Rodrigues You've misread my post. I am talking about the local send buffer and the remote receive buffer. In the reverse direction the issue concerns the remote send buffer and the local receive buffer. –  EJP Aug 7 '12 at 4:35
    
I thought I did understand your post, and just minded that the other endpoints are netcat which can read much faster than the local node is writing (and write much faster than the local node is reading). This is relevant to show the difference between the max 80MB/sec/CPU on my Mac vs. 160MB/sec/CPU on a similar powered Linux machine. But my issue is about the read and write going down to a couple KB/sec and stopping for seconds and only when reading and writing at the same time, hence some wrongdoing on the code. –  Bruno D. Rodrigues Aug 7 '12 at 8:49
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/8042212/… Your own comment refers the following: "I suggest that your reading process is slow and that this is causing its receive buffer to back up, which is causing your send buffer to back up, which stalls your sends." Can you further elaborate on this? is one buffer really tied up to the other one? This is exactly the issue I have, both in the sample attached that tries to write twice as much as I read, as in my real code that tries to throttle the reading channel. –  Bruno D. Rodrigues Aug 7 '12 at 8:55

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