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*Solved. Thanks for the explanations guys, I didn't fully understand the implications of using a value type in this situation.

I have a struct that I'm using from a static class. However, the behavior is showing unexpected behavior when I print it's internal state at runtime. Here's my struct:

    public struct VersionedObject
    {

        public VersionedObject(object o)
        {
            m_SelectedVer = 0;
            ObjectVersions = new List<object>();
            ObjectVersions.Add(o);
        }

        private int m_SelectedVer;
        public int SelectedVersion
        {
            get
            {
                return m_SelectedVer;
            }

        }

        public List<object> ObjectVersions;//Clarifying:  This is only used to retrieve values,  nothing is .Added from outside this struct in my code.

        public void AddObject(object m)
        {
            ObjectVersions.Add(m);
            m_SelectedVer = ObjectVersions.Count - 1;
        }
    }

Test code

        VersionedObject vo = new VersionedObject(1);
        vo.AddObject(2);//This is the second call to AddObject()
        //Expected value of vo.SelectedVerion:  1
        //Actual value of vo.SelectedVersion:   1

Now, if you test this code in isolation, i.e., copy it into your project to give it a whirl, it will return the expected result.

The problem; What I'm observing in my production code is this debug output:

objectName, ObjectVersions.Count:2, SelectedVer:0,

Why? From my understanding, and testing, this should be completely impossible under any circumstances.

My random guess is that there is some sort of immutability going on, that for some reason a new struct is being instanced via default constructor, and the ObjectVersions data is being copied over, but the m_SelectedVersion is private and cannot be copied into the new struct?
Does my use of Static classes and methods to manipulate the struct have anything to do with it?

I'm so stumped I'm just inventing wild guesses at this point.

share|improve this question
    
Impossible? your ObjectVersions List is public, so other code is free to alter that without impacting m_SelectedVer. Since we can't see what your other code is doing, it's difficult to offer any other observation. –  Tim Williams Aug 7 '12 at 0:24
    
Agree, however I can confirm that this is not happening in this situation. –  Kal_Torak Aug 7 '12 at 0:27
    
Well something odd is clearly going on, and the design of your struct doesn't prevent the two fields from being out of sync, so what else to suggest? My only suggestion is to place some debugging output or breakpoints in your struct so you can trace exactly where this odd behavior occurs. –  Tim Williams Aug 7 '12 at 0:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Struct is value type. So most likely you are creating multiple copies of your object in your actual code.

Consider simply changing struct to class as content of your struct is not really good fit for value type (as it is mutable and also contains mutable reference type).

More on "struct is value type":

First check FAQ which have many good answers already.

Value types are passed by value - so if you call function to update such object it will not update original. You can treat them similar to passing integer value to function: i.e. would you expect SomeFunction(42) to be able to change value of 42?

struct MyStruct { public int V;}
void UpdateStruct(MyStruct x)
{
  x.V = 42; // updates copy of passed in object, changes will not be visible outside.
}
....
var local = new MyStruct{V = 13}
UpdateStruct(local); // Hope to get local.V == 42
if (local.V == 13) {
  // Expected. copy inside UpdateStruct updated,
  // but this "local" is untouched.
}
share|improve this answer
    
While changing it to class may indeed avoid the problem, I'm also interested to know why I'm getting the results I am, as it indicates I don't understand what's happening under the surface. In this case, if a new object is being created, how and why does the new object have only some of the values of the old object and not others? –  Kal_Torak Aug 7 '12 at 0:24
    
@Kal_Torak, updated with link to FAQ and some sample. –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 7 '12 at 0:54
1  
@Kal_Torak: because it's a shallow copy: the private instance variable m_SelectedVer (an int) is a value type and is simply copied to the new struct. The instance variable ObjectVersions, is a reference type (List<T>). Only the reference to it is copied. Now you have two instances of your struct that share a reference to a single instance of your List<T> backing store. Adding to that single backing store instance via your AddObject() method only increases the version count in only one of the two instances. –  Nicholas Carey Aug 7 '12 at 16:24

Why is this a struct and not a class? Even better, why are you tracking the size of the backing store (List<T>) rather than letting the List<T> track that for you. Since that underlying backing store is public, it can be manipulated without your struct's knowledge. I suspect something in your production code is adding to the backing store without going through your struct.

If it were me, I'd set it up something like this, though I'd make it a class...but that's almost certainly a breaking change:

public struct VersionedObject
{

    public VersionedObject()
    {
        this.ObjectVersions = new List<object>() ;
        return ;
    }

    public VersionedObject(object o) : this()
    {
        ObjectVersions.Add(o);
        return ;
    }
    public VersionedObject( params object[] o ) : this()
    {
        ObjectVersions.AddRange( o ) ;
        return ;
    }

    public int SelectedVersion
    {
        get
        {
            int value = this.ObjectVersions.Count - 1 ;
            return value ;
        }
    }
    public List<object> ObjectVersions  ;

    public void AddObject(object m)
    {
        ObjectVersions.Add(m);
        return ;
    }

}

You'll note that this has the same semantics as your struct, but the SelectedVersion property now reflects what's actually in the backing store.

share|improve this answer
    
Good points. I'm actually changing it to be a class right now, and wrapping up the List<T> access. The reason I'm tracking the backing size is because code I haven't added yet is going to allow retrieving a given index/version. I would reiterate though, I have confirmed my production code is not modifying the List<T> from the outside. It's only accessed in 2 locations, easy to check. –  Kal_Torak Aug 7 '12 at 0:45
    
@Kal_Torak If you are using the struct in two locations, look at how it is getting to the two. If you pass it to a method (without specifying ref) or assign it to a local variable, then copy of the struct will be passed. You can confirm this by changing the struct to a class. –  Trisped Aug 7 '12 at 0:51

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