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So I've been working on the Harvard CS50 course on iTunes U and have run into a bit of a problem. The code runs and then stops. I explain the issue where the code is giving me trouble.

// Program calculates the amount of change you can give with the least amount of coins.

 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <cs50.h>
 #include <math.h>

int
main(void)
{

    float change = 0, inputflag = 1;
    int changeint = 0;
    int quarter = 25, dime = 10, nickel = 5, penny = 1; // Coins and values
    int qc = 0, dc = 0, nc = 0, pc = 0; // Coin value change (Qc = Quarter Change)

// Prompts user for input and validates. 

    while (inputflag == 1)
     {
        printf("How much change? ");
        change = GetFloat();

        if (change == 0)
        {
            printf("You have no change!\n");
            inputflag = 0;
        }
        else if (change > 0)
        {
            printf("%.2f\n", change);
            inputflag = 0;
        }
        else
        {
            printf("Please enter a non-negative number! \n");
        }
     } 

The program stops here. I run the code, input an acceptable value and then the program stops running. It doesn't move onto the part below.

I have spent the last hour going over this and still can't figure out what is keeping the program from running. The inputflag value gets set to 0 thus breaking the first while loop and then should move on below if (change != 0) which it doesn't...So any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    if (change != 0) // If the change is zero, this section is skipped
        {
            changeint = round(100 * change);
            printf("%d", changeint);
        }

      // The following four sections subtract coin amount, compare it, and add 1 to count.  
          while (changeint >= quarter);    
          {   
               changeint = changeint - quarter;
               qc = qc + 1;
          }

          while (changeint >= dime);
          {
               changeint = changeint - dime;
               dc = dc + 1;
          }

          while (changeint >= nickel);
          {
               changeint = changeint - nickel;
               nc = nc + 1;
          }

          while (changeint >= penny);
          {
               changeint = changeint - penny;
               pc = pc + 1;
          }

//Prints output

          printf("You owe a total of %d coins!", qc + dc + nc + pc);

}
share|improve this question
    
Also, you may want to read up on the modulus (%) operator. It'll let you get rid of a lot of code in this application. –  duskwuff Aug 7 '12 at 0:27
    
BTW, you can use break; to break out of a loop, no need to use a variable –  Ed S. Aug 7 '12 at 0:28
    
Oh I forgot about that - the GetFloat statement is in a course exclusive library. However, I don't think thats the problem because it's simply not breaking out of the look. I'll try the break; statement and report back –  user1580558 Aug 7 '12 at 0:31
2  
Don't use floats for flags. Use integers. That may even be your problem, although I think float can represent 1 and 0 with full accuracy. (Larger or smaller numbers are as floats rounded off, so an equality against an integer will fail, e.g. float f = 10000000, int i = 10000000, (f == i) is false because internally f is actually say 9999999.99999876 and this rounds down to 9999999). –  user82238 Aug 7 '12 at 0:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The semi-colons at the first line of each while statement are to blame. You should remove them to avoid an inevitable infinite loop:

      while (changeint >= quarter) 
      {   
           changeint = changeint - quarter;
           qc = qc + 1;
      }

      while (changeint >= dime)
      {
           changeint = changeint - dime;
           dc = dc + 1;
      }

      while (changeint >= nickel)
      {
           changeint = changeint - nickel;
           nc = nc + 1;
      }

      while (changeint >= penny)
      {
           changeint = changeint - penny;
           pc = pc + 1;
      }

Yes, even the simplest of problems might go undetected, and for/while statements with semi-colons are one of them (which could be intended).

share|improve this answer
1  
And that's why you should compile with and pay attention to warnings. GCC, at least, warns about this error. –  Kevin Aug 7 '12 at 0:48
    
Sweet. This did the trick. However, I'm still confused as to why the code didn't execute up to the if (change != 0) // If the change is zero, this section is skipped { changeint = round(100 * change); printf("%d", changeint); } If the issue was with the while statements –  user1580558 Aug 7 '12 at 0:51
    
The printf() call cannot assure you that the program did not execute any statement. You probably didn't see this value being printed to stdout, which made you do that assumption. But rememeber that once printf() is called, the actual printing process is taken part by the system, and might not happen immediately after the call. –  E_net4 Aug 7 '12 at 0:58
    
@Kevin: How? -Wall -Wextra -pedantic and it compiles just fine for me. –  netcoder Aug 7 '12 at 2:16
    
Yeah, It didn't give me an error when I compiled it which was why I was stumped. –  user1580558 Aug 7 '12 at 3:25

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