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I need to take an image and save it after some process. The figure looks fine when I display it, but when I save the figure I got some white space around the saved image. I have tried the 'tight' option for savefig method, did not work either. The code:

  import matplotlib.image as mpimg
  import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

  fig = plt.figure(1)
  img = mpimg.imread(path)
  plt.imshow(img)
  ax=fig.add_subplot(1,1,1)

  extent = ax.get_window_extent().transformed(fig.dpi_scale_trans.inverted())
  plt.savefig('1.png', bbox_inches=extent)

  plt.axis('off') 
  plt.show()

I am trying to draw a basic graph by using NetworkX on a figure and save it. I realized that without graph it works, but when added a graph I get white space around the saved image;

import matplotlib.image as mpimg
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import networkx as nx

G = nx.Graph()
G.add_node(1)
G.add_node(2)
G.add_node(3)
G.add_edge(1,3)
G.add_edge(1,2)
pos = {1:[100,120], 2:[200,300], 3:[50,75]}

fig = plt.figure(1)
img = mpimg.imread("C:\\images\\1.jpg")
plt.imshow(img)
ax=fig.add_subplot(1,1,1)

nx.draw(G, pos=pos)

extent = ax.get_window_extent().transformed(fig.dpi_scale_trans.inverted())
plt.savefig('1.png', bbox_inches = extent)

plt.axis('off') 
plt.show()
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Welcome to Stack Overflow! It's useful if you put the question in the title, in this case what you actually want to do is remove the white space around your image when you save an image in matplotlib. Also, salutations and "thanks/cheers" are unnecessary, reward the best answers with upvotes and acceptance! I've gone ahead and edited your post as noted. –  Hooked Aug 7 '12 at 13:47

2 Answers 2

You can remove the white space padding by setting bbox_inches="tight" in savefig:

plt.savefig("test.png",bbox_inches='tight')

You'll have to put the argument to bbox_inches as a string, perhaps this is why it didn't work earlier for you.


Possible duplicates:

Matplotlib plots: removing axis, legends and white spaces

How to set the margins for a matplotlib figure?

Reduce left and right margins in matplotlib plot

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What I try to do is to draw a graph on a figure by NetworkX then save it as an image. The problem - whiteSpace could be related to NetworkX commands. Anyway, I updated the question. Thanks –  Ahmet Tuğrul Bayrak Aug 7 '12 at 16:46
    
This works great... until I have a suptitle which gets ignored by it. –  Elliot Jan 3 '13 at 22:11
1  
If you have multiple subplots and want to save each of them, you can use this with fig.savefig() too. (plt.savefig() will not work in that case.) –  Abhranil Das Apr 21 '13 at 12:06
    
That's not quite right. When you use that bbox_inches option, there's another default that leaves some space. If you really want to get rid of everything, you need to also use pad_inches=0.0. Of course, such tight padding frequently cuts off, e.g., exponents... –  Mike Dec 19 at 16:46

I cannot claim I know exactly why or how my “solution” works, but this is what I had to do when I wanted to plot the outline of a couple of aerofoil sections — without white margins — to a PDF file. (Note that I used matplotlib inside an IPython notebook, with the -pylab flag.)

gca().set_axis_off()
subplots_adjust(top = 1, bottom = 0, right = 1, left = 0, 
            hspace = 0, wspace = 0)
margins(0,0)
gca().xaxis.set_major_locator(NullLocator())
gca().yaxis.set_major_locator(NullLocator())
savefig("filename.pdf", bbox_inches = 'tight',
    pad_inches = 0)

I have tried to deactivate different parts of this, but this always lead to a white margin somewhere. You may even have modify this to keep fat lines near the limits of the figure from being shaved by the lack of margins.

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