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I am trying to make a script for text editing. In this case I have a text file named text.csv, which reads:

first;48548a;48954a,48594B
second;58757a;5875b
third;58756a;58576b;5867d;56894d;45864a

I want to make text format to like this:

first;48548a
first;48954a
first;48594B
second;58757a
second;5875b
third;58756a
third;58576b
third;5867d
third;56894d
third;45864a

What is command should I use to make this happen?

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2  
What have you tried? –  jordanm Aug 7 '12 at 1:14
    
In your first line of input data, is the last separator supposed to be a comma, or a semicolon? Or do you want to accept either character as a separator? (The answer might affect how tools are used to split your data.) –  ghoti Aug 7 '12 at 1:18
    
hi Jordanm, I just try to use awk command but I do know how to make it happen, thats why I asking what is command should I use.. :D .. by the way thanks for your help –  adhown Aug 7 '12 at 2:40
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'd do this in awk.

Assuming your first line should have a ; instead of a ,:

$ awk -F\; '{for(n=2; n<=NF; n++) { printf("%s;%s\n",$1,$n); }}' input.txt

Untested.

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Here is a pure bash solution that handles both , and ;.

while IFS=';,' read -a data; do 
   id="${data[0]}"
   data=("${data[@]:1}")
   for item in "${data[@]}"; do 
      printf '%s;%s\n' "$id" "$item" 
   done
done < input.txt

UPDATED - alternate printing method based on chepner's suggestion:

while IFS=';,' read -a data; do 
   id="${data[0]}"
   data=("${data[@]:1}")
   printf "$id;%s\n" "${data[@]}" 
done < input.txt
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Or printf "$id;%s\n" "${data[@]}"; no for loop necessary. –  chepner Aug 7 '12 at 2:06
    
@chepner - That is a good suggestion. I usually don't like expanding variables in printf's format string, but it does save a loop. –  jordanm Aug 7 '12 at 2:10
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awk -v FS=';' -v OFS=';' '{for (i = 2; i <= NF; ++i) { print $1, $i }}' Explanation: awk implicitly splits data into records(by default separeted by newline, i.e. line == record) which then are split into numbered fields by given field separator(FS for input field separator and OFS for output separator). For each record this script prints first field(which is record name), along with i-th field, and that's exactly what you need.

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while IFS=';,' read -a data; do 
   id="${data[0]}"
   data=("${data[@]:1}")
   printf "$id;%s\n" "${data[@]}" 
done < input.txt

or

awk -v FS=';' -v OFS=';' '{for (i = 2; i <= NF; ++i) { print $1, $i }}'

And

$ awk -F\; '{for(n=2; n<=NF; n++) { printf("%s;%s\n",$1,$n); }}' input.txt

thanks all for your suggestions, :d. It's really give me a new knowledge..

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1  
If you are going to answer your own question, it should include something that was not already posted as an answer. Instead of reposting the answers, you should upvote them and select one to "accept". Please read the FAQ. –  jordanm Aug 7 '12 at 15:10
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