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In my company style guide it says that bash scripts cannot be longer than 80 lines. So I have this gigantic sed substitution over twice as long. How can I break it into more lines so that it still works? I have

sed -i s/AAAAA...AAA/BBBBB...BBB/g

And I want something like

sed -i s/AAAAA...AAA/
BBBBB...BBB/g

still having the same effect.

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80 columns, that's an old legacy requirement... –  jordanm Aug 7 '12 at 1:44
    
@jordanm If you're over 80 columns long in a bash script, 99% of the time you're doing something wrong. –  Swiss Aug 7 '12 at 1:47
1  
@Swiss - it's very easy to do with pipes to awk –  jordanm Aug 7 '12 at 2:01
    
@jordanm You description sounds like it could possibly be cleaned up. Awk is a scripting language, so complicated Awk scripts are better put in their own file as is done with Perl scripts. More importantly, you can break a command with pipes up into multiple lines without even needing to escape the newline. –  Swiss Aug 7 '12 at 3:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Possible ways to clean up

1) Put your sed script into a file

sed -f script [file ...]

2) Use Regex shorthand

sed 's!A\{30,\}!BBBBB...BBBB!g'

3) Use Bash variables to help break it up a bit

regex="AAAA.AAAAAA"
replace="BBBB...BBBBBBB"
sed "s/${regex}/${replace}/g"

What not to do

1) Escape the newline to break it up into multiple lines.

You will end up with a newline in your sed script that you don't want.

sed 's/THIS IS WRONG /\
AND WILL BREAK YOUR SCRIPT/g'
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+1 Yeap, this is the right way; especially with sed in the context of scripts. –  Burhan Khalid Aug 7 '12 at 1:48

Use the shell continuation character, which is normally \.

[~]$ foo \
> and \
> bar

Space is not required:

[~]$ foo\
> and\
> bar\
> zoo\
> no space\
> whee!\
share|improve this answer
    
yes but that requires space to be inserted before it is used. I do not have this luxury with sed substitution :( –  nivwusquorum Aug 7 '12 at 1:41

Just insert backslash character before a newline:

sed -i s/AAAAA...AAA/\
BBBBB...BBB/g
share|improve this answer
    
yes but that requires space to be inserted before it is used. I do not have this luxury with sed substitution :( –  nivwusquorum Aug 7 '12 at 1:45
    
Works for me without any spaces. –  Alexander Putilin Aug 7 '12 at 1:49

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