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Very recently I've started to learn Ruby and I was experimenting with how Ruby calls methods on individual objects. However, the following code piece stuck me hard as I am not realising how it is actually working to

a = 4
b = -3
c = 2

puts a*b-c                      # operator precedence preserved
puts a . * b . - c              # operator precedence not preserved
puts a.send(:*, b).send(:-, c)  # operator precedence preserved
puts a-b*c                      # operator precedence preserved
puts a . - b . * c              # operator precedence preserved
puts a.send(:-, b).send(:*, c)  # operator precedence not preserved

Outputs:

-14
-20    
-14
10
10
14

Can anyone able to explain how the operator precedence working here? I assumed all the three syntax in each part should reflect the same meaning. I apologise first if this question has been asked or explained already.

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7  
I don't understand your question. In examples 2, 3, 5 and 6 you don't use operator syntax, you use method syntax, so operator precedence doesn't even come into play. –  Jörg W Mittag Aug 7 '12 at 2:40
1  
Is that means we can not use operator syntax and method syntax like a vice versa way in Ruby ?? I thought for say example 2 and 3 or 5 and 6 interpreting the same meaning. Can you kindly able to explain this please? Thanks. –  jmkam Aug 7 '12 at 2:53
4  
@JoarderKamal All method calls always have the same precedence, while operators may have different precedence. –  Andrew Marshall Aug 7 '12 at 2:58
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Operator precedence only applies when using operators. All of these examples:

puts a . * b . - c              # operator precedence not preserved
puts a.send(:*, b).send(:-, c)  # operator precedence preserved
puts a . - b . * c              # operator precedence preserved
puts a.send(:-, b).send(:*, c)  # operator precedence not preserved

are direct method calls, and happen to be in either the wrong order or the right order as compared to their corresponding operators.

Maybe parentheses make it more clear?

puts a.*(b.-(c))                # .- called first, .* with the return value of .-
puts a.send(:*, b).send(:-, c)  # .* called first, .- with the return value of .*
puts a.-(b.*(c))                # .* called first, .- with the return value of .*
puts a.send(:-, b).send(:*, c)  # .- called first, .* with the return value of .-
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Is it means that when we would like to exactly transform an operator syntax to method call syntax we have to use appropriate parenthesis by ourselves otherwise Ruby interpreter will not able to recognise the operator precedence by it self? Right .. –  jmkam Aug 7 '12 at 3:08
    
@JoarderKamal: You don't necessarily have to use parentheses; just rewrite them as right-to-left. (But... why would you do that?) –  false Aug 7 '12 at 3:11
    
Because ... I just did this puts a.*b.-c # operator precedence not preserved puts a.*(b).-(c) # operator precedence preserved Outputs: -20 -14 that means without any parenthesis the expressions are working differently. –  jmkam Aug 7 '12 at 3:18
    
@JoarderKamal: Yes. The implied parentheses are a.*(b.-(c)). Use parentheses if you want, but I still don't see why you'd want to write it like that. –  false Aug 7 '12 at 3:21
1  
@JoarderKamal: They are doing the same thing. The default associativity of method arguments is right-to-left. So a.*b.-c is equivalent to a.*(b.-(c)) - not a.*(b).-(c). The former calls b.-(c) first and then calls a.*(the result). The latter calls a.*(b) first and then calls (the result).-(c). –  false Aug 7 '12 at 3:31
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Only examples 1 and 4 obey arithmetic operator precedence, becuase only examples 1 and 4 call the operators as operators.

Examples 3 and 6 all make calls to the send method, so they behaves just like any other method call. They go from left to right, just like what happens when you write a complicated one-liner on a collection of data, like so:

somearray.select{|x| somecondition(x)}.map{|x| somefunction(x)}.each{|x| puts x}

The only confusing ones are examples 2 and 5. The trick with these is that you can understand what's happening if you remove the spaces around the periods. Then you get:

puts a.* b.- c
puts a.- b.* c

Now, it should be obvious that first there's a method call on b, applying some operator that takes c as an argument. This returns some result. That result is used as the argument to an operator call on a. The result of that is given to puts. In other words, these lines evaluate from right to left, and the statements are equivalent to

puts(a.*(b.-(c)))
puts(a.-(b.*(c)))
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If that is the case, then obviously example 2 and 3 or example 5 and 6 are interpreting the same meaning. Then whey they are not producing same result? It should be -20 for example 2 and 3 or 10 for example 5 and 6. –  jmkam Aug 7 '12 at 3:12
    
@JoarderKamal. They're don't have the same meaning. One goes right to left, the other goes left to right. I've edited to explain better. –  Ken Bloom Aug 7 '12 at 13:05
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