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I'm trying to write a procedure that returns a list of all primes below a given number.

For example:

Prelude>primes 8  
[2,3,5,7]  

When I try to load the file I get Parse error in pattern Failed, modules loaded: none. If someone could point me in the right direction I would be grateful.

primes :: Int -> [Int]
primes x < 2 = []
primes x | isPrime x == True = primes (x - 1) ++ x
         | otherwise = primes (x - 1)

isPrime :: Int -> Bool
isPrime x | x < 2 = False
          | x == 2 || x == 3 = True
          | divEven x == True = False
          | divOdd x 3 == True = False
          | otherwise = True

divEven :: Int -> Bool
divEven x | mod x 2 == 0 = True
          | otherwise = False

divOdd :: Int Int -> Bool
divOdd x num | mod x num == 0 == True
             | num <= x/2 = divOdd x (num + 2)
             | otherwise = False
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1  
x == True is the same as x. –  Vitus Aug 7 '12 at 2:49
    
Thanks Vitus. I actually had it without that earlier, but added it in when it wouldn't compile. I suppose it doesn't really make any difference. –  Sirius Black Aug 7 '12 at 2:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A collection of small mistakes.

  1. Your syntax is incorrect.

    primes x < 2 = []
    

    Probably you meant

    primes x | x < 2 = []
    

    Similarly, where you write

    divOdd x num | mod x num == 0 == True
    

    you probably meant

    divOdd x num | mod x num == 0 = True
    
  2. The type signature

    divOdd :: Int Int -> Bool
    

    is not valid. You probably meant

    divOdd :: Int -> Int -> Bool
    
  3. x is of type Int, and (/) :: Fractional a => a -> a -> a cannot be applied to it. You probably mean num <= x `div` 2 or 2 * num <= x.

    divOdd :: Int Int -> Bool
    divOdd x num | mod x num == 0 == True
                 | num <= x/2 = divOdd x (num + 2)
                 | otherwise = False
    
  4. x is of type Int, not [Int]. (++) :: [a] -> [a] -> [a] will not apply to it.

    primes x | isPrime x == True = primes (x - 1) ++ x
    

    Perhaps you meant

    primes x | isPrime x == True = primes (x - 1) ++ [x]
    

Finally, this is a fairly inefficient way of generating primes. Have you considered a sieve? Prime numbers - HaskellWiki may be a bit difficult for you right now, but shows many different strategies.

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Thank you very much. These were indeed my problems. As you may have guessed I am fairly new to Haskell. I will look into sieve, thanks for the suggestion. –  Sirius Black Aug 7 '12 at 3:07
    
Probably need backtick escapes for infix use of `div` –  roldugin Aug 7 '12 at 3:14
    
@roldugin Stack Overflow's Markdown makes it difficult to insert backticks in inline code -- works differently in questions and answers than in comments -- but I've fixed it; should be correct now. –  ephemient Aug 7 '12 at 3:35
    
@ephemient you can put double backticks around your inline code fragments in answers and questions, then single backticks will work. –  Will Ness Aug 7 '12 at 4:44

Here's a re-write of your functions using list comprehensions (also in Wikipedia), perhaps this is more visually apparent:

primes :: Int -> [Int]
primes x | x<2  = [] 
         | x<4  = [2..x]
         | True = primes (x-1) ++ [x | isPrime x]

your isPrime is

isPrime x = x > 1 && 
          ( x < 4 || 
            and [ rem x n /= 0 | n <- 2 : [3,5..(div x 2)+2] ] )

and is a function defined in standard Prelude. It will test entries in a list, left to right, to see if all are True. It will stop on the first False entry encountered, so the rest of them won't get explored.

Sometimes when the code is more visually apparent it is easier to see how to improve it.

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your isPrime will check 3 conditions every time, it's better to have an infinite list of primes and take x elements from it –  Vixen Aug 7 '12 at 9:09
    
@Vixen it's not "mine"; :) I just wrote down the OP code in a different form which is IMO clearer and easier to see how to improve. :) you're quite right; as a standalone function it has to check them, so it should be made internal to "primes" so extra checks can be dropped, etc. etc. I wanted to provide the OP an easy starting point. –  Will Ness Aug 7 '12 at 9:29

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