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I'm still new to Java and I'm trying to create a general purpose stack queue that uses an object array. I known that I've done things incorrectly, namely declaring the arrays and assigning the array lengths.

Can someone take a look and give me some feedback?

public class GeneralStack
{
    GeneralStack [] stack;  //not sure how to declare this
    private int count;
    private static final int DEFAULT_CAPACITY = 100;

//default constructor
public GeneralStack()
    {
        stack = new int[DEFAULT_CAPACITY];
        count = 0;
    }

//alternate constructor
public GeneralStack (int maxCapacity)
    {
        stack = new int[maxCapacity];
        count = setCount;
    }

//accessor getCount
public int getCount ()
    {
    return count;
    }

//accessor isEmpty
public boolean isEmpty ()
    {
    boolean isEmpty=false;
    if (count == 0);
        {
            isEmpty=true;
        }
    return isEmpty;
    }

//accessor isFull
public boolean isFull ()
    {
    boolean isFull=false;
    if (count == maxCapacity);
        {
        isFull=true;
        }
    return isFull;
    }

//mutator push
public void push (int value)
    {
    if (isFull ())
        {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Stack is full");
        }
    else
        {
        stack[value]; //not sure how to assign value to the stack
        count++;
        }
    }

//mutator pop
public void pop ()
    {
         int topVal = top();
        count = count-1;
        return topVal;
    }

//accessor top
public int topVal ()
    {
    if (isEmpty())
        {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Stack is empty");
        }
    else 
        {
        topVal=stack[count-1];
        }
    return topVal;
    }
} 
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closed as not a real question by casperOne Aug 7 '12 at 12:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
So what do you want? For people to rewrite it for you? –  Antimony Aug 7 '12 at 4:56
    
Unless there's a specific issue you want help with, consider posting this on codereview.stackexchange.com –  Paul Bellora Aug 7 '12 at 5:01
    
Tbh, if you're gonna be using something stack-like like that, just use an ArrayList. Much easier. However, if you want to make an array stack, so be it. However, there are a lot of error's in that code. I suggest getting an IDE to help you (such as Eclipse). This isn't a site where you post your code, and tell people to fix it. –  Alex Coleman Aug 7 '12 at 5:07
    
@AlexColeman an ArrayDeque is a more fitting alternative. –  oldrinb Aug 7 '12 at 5:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. stack appears to have been intended to be an array of the element type, which push(int) tells me is int.
  2. What kind of general stack is limited to int?
  3. setCount appears to have been intended to be maxCapacity in the GeneralStack(int) constructor.
  4. Your isEmpty() method will not work properly because you have an unintended semicolon after your if condition. if (count == 0) ; means 'if count equals zero, do nothing`. You likely intended:

    if (count == 0) {
      isEmpty = true;
    }
    

    In fact, the entire method can be shortened to a single statement.

  5. The same issue in #3 also applies to isFull(), with a similar shortened form. You also have no maxCapacity variable in scope... perhaps you forgot to declare and initialize a field?
  6. Assigning to the stack should be mutating the array element corresponding to the top.
  7. pop() should not return anything if it is declared void. In addition, count = count - 1 can be shortened using the decrement operator, --, e.g. --count;.
  8. What presumably you meant to name top() (judging by the code of pop()), you accidentally named topVal(). Additionally, you never declare the topVal variable in the method scope. You can rewrite the method to obviate the need for the variable at all by directly returning the element from the array.
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@Dawson since you appear newer here, please don't forget to mark the answer accepted which helped most in solving the problem. –  oldrinb Aug 15 '12 at 5:34

I agree please use something like arraylist. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/Stack.html Is already implemented class but i fixed your code in case you are new to java and just are playing around with it. Did not check logic but hopefully syntax correction helps

    package Temp;

    public class GeneralStack
{
    int[] stack;  //not sure how to declare this
    private int count;
    private int maxCapacity;
    private static final int DEFAULT_CAPACITY = 100;

//default constructor
public GeneralStack()
    {
        stack = new int[DEFAULT_CAPACITY];
        count = 0;
        maxCapacity = this.DEFAULT_CAPACITY;
    }

//alternate constructor
public GeneralStack (int maxCapacity)
    {
        stack = new int[maxCapacity];
        count = 0;
        this.maxCapacity = maxCapacity;
    }

//accessor getCount
public int getCount ()
    {
    return count;
    }

//accessor isEmpty
public boolean isEmpty ()
    {
    boolean isEmpty=false;
    if (count == 0);
        {
            isEmpty=true;
        }
    return isEmpty;
    }

//accessor isFull
public boolean isFull ()
    {
    boolean isFull=false;
    if (count == maxCapacity);
        {
        isFull=true;
        }
    return isFull;
    }

//mutator push
public void push (int value)
    {
    if (isFull ())
        {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Stack is full");
        }
    else
        {
        stack[count] = value; //not sure how to assign value to the stack
        count++;
        }
    }

// you cant return value from void function so changing it to int return you can ignore a return value 
public int pop ()
    {
         int topVal = topVal();
        count = count-1;
        return topVal;
    }

//accessor top
public int topVal ()
    {
    int topVal;
    if (isEmpty())
        {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Stack is empty");
        }
    else 
        {
        topVal=stack[count-1];
        }
    return topVal;
    }
} 
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2  
Do not use Stack when using JDK 6+. Read the documentation on the class in JDK 7: A more complete and consistent set of LIFO stack operations is provided by the Deque interface and its implementations, which should be used in preference to this class. For example: Deque<Integer> stack = new ArrayDeque<Integer>(); –  oldrinb Aug 7 '12 at 5:37
    
-1 for referencing documentation to an ancient version of Java (Java 1.4, hello 2002). –  pap Aug 7 '12 at 7:07

where did I go wrong?

  1. It looks to me like there are some compile errors here. e.g. you call a function top() that does not appear to exist (I would guess you meant topVal()).
  2. If you want your stack to take in any type, you should look into Generic Types.
  3. In a stack, you'll want to accept the same type as a parameter for push that you return for pop. Your push function accepts integers, but your pop function is void.
  4. The array backing your data structure needs to be the same type as that used in step (2) above. As it is now, it seems like perhaps you want that to be an integer, but as step (1) recommends, perhaps look into using a generic type.
  5. In your push function, where you say "not sure how to assign value to the stack", you should be saying stack[count] = value.

These things should get you started towards a working solution. There are probably other things that need to be changed, but these are at least some of the fundamental mistakes you have made here.

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