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I'm looking at the following code demonstrating nested hashes:

my %HoH = (
    flintstones => {
        husband   => "fred",
        pal       => "barney",
    },
    jetsons => {
        husband   => "george",
        wife      => "jane",
        "his boy" => "elroy",  # Key quotes needed.
    },
    simpsons => {
        husband   => "homer",
        wife      => "marge",
        kid       => "bart",
    },
);

Why is it that the upper-most hash (starting line 1) is initialized using parentheses, whereas the sub-hashes are initialized using curly braces?

Coming from a python background I must say Perl is quite odd :).

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3 Answers 3

Coming from a Perl background I find Perl quite odd, too.

Use parentheses to initialize a hash (or an array). A hash is a map between a set of strings and a set of scalar values.

%foo = ( "key1", "value1",  "key2", "value2", ... );   #  % means hash
%foo = ( key1 => "value1",  key2 => "value2", ... );   # same thing

Braces are used to define a hash reference. All references are scalar values.

$foo = { key1 => "value1", key2 => "value2", ... };    #  $ means scalar

Hashes are not scalar values, so it is not possible to use a hash as a value of another hash.

%bar = ( key3 => %foo );     # doesn't mean what you think it means

But we can use hash references as values of another hash, because hash references are scalars.

$foo = { key1 => "value1", key2 => "value2" };
%bar = ( key3 => $foo );
%baz = ( key4 => { key5 => "value5", key6 => "value6" } );

And that is why you see parentheses surrounding a list of lists with braces.

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1  
Just for completeness...while it's true that key3 => %foo doesn't do what it seems, key3 => \%foo adds a reference and is a very simple way to make it do what one would intend in that situation. –  Kevin Grant Aug 7 '12 at 6:06

First, the parens do nothing but change precedence here. They have nothing to do with list creation, hash creation or hash initialisation. You can use parens around the operand of the hash creation operator,

{ ( a => 1, b => 2 ) }

and you can omit the parens around the operand of the assignment operator when precedence allows.

sub f { return a => 1, b => 2 }
my %hash = f(); 

Second, one doesn't initialise a hash using { }; one creates a hash using it. { } is equivalent to my %hash;, except that the hash is anonymous. In other words,

{ EXPR }

is basically the same as

do { my %anon = EXPR; \%anon }

(but doesn't create a lexical scope).

Anonymous hashes allows one to write

my %HoH = (
    flintstones => {
        husband   => "fred",
        pal       => "barney",
    },
    jetsons => {
        husband   => "george",
        wife      => "jane",
        "his boy" => "elroy",
    },
    simpsons => {
        husband   => "homer",
        wife      => "marge",
        kid       => "bart",
    },
);

instead of

my %flintstones = (
    husband   => "fred",
    pal       => "barney",
);
my %jetsons = (
    husband   => "george",
    wife      => "jane",
    "his boy" => "elroy", 
);
my %simpsons = (
    husband   => "homer",
    wife      => "marge",
    kid       => "bart",
);
my %HoH = (
    flintstones => \%flinstones,
    jetsons     => \%jetsons,
    simpsons    => \%simpsons,
);
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The essential difference (....) is used to create a hash. {....} is used to create a hash reference

my %hash  = ( a => 1 , b => 2 ) ;
my $hash_ref  = { a => 1 , b => 2 } ;

In a bit more detail - {....} makes an anonymous hash and returns a reference to it wich is asigned to the scalar $hash_ref

edited to give a bit more detail

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