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I am looking for an elegant way to call a function based on the type of parameter that is passed as parameter.

In other words, I want the EntryPoint method (below) to dynamically call the appropriate myFunc method, based on the type of the template parameter.

public void EntryPoint(object template)
{
    missingMethod(template);//This is the code in question that should call myFunc
}

private void myFunc(TemplateA template)
{
    doSomething(template);
}

private void myFunc(TemplateB template)
{
    doSomethingElse(template);
}

private void myFunc(object template)
{
    throw new NotImplementedException(template.GetType());
}
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This appears to be an accidental second attempt at posting the same question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1183930/methods-overloading/1184044 –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 26 '09 at 8:55
    
No it is not. The question you linked to, concerns with a specific syntax that results in certain behavior. I was trying to figure out what's going on behind the scenes. This question, although related to the previous one, is looking for a solution to a general problem, without referring to a specific implementation. –  Elad Jul 26 '09 at 9:15
1  
I see what you mean - the other question is effectively "Does method overload resolution happen at compile time or runtime?" and the answer is "Compile time today, but you can choose in C# 4". But the solution today is the same however you state it: virtual methods if dispatching on the type of one object, or something more complicated (probably utilizing a Dictionary) if dispatching on the type of two objects. –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 26 '09 at 9:37
    
Well said. And I really liked your Dictionary<Type,Func> implementation. –  Elad Jul 26 '09 at 12:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Three options:

  • A series of if/else statements (ugly but simple and easy to understand)
  • Double dispatch with the visitor pattern (can be awkward)
  • Wait until C# 4 and use dynamic typing (might not be feasible in your case)

Personally I'd try to think of an alternative design which didn't require this in the first place, but obviously that's not always realistic.

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I'll try to suggest my boss the third option... Now seriously, thanks for the great answer. –  Elad Jul 26 '09 at 9:19

Why not make myFunc a method? (and override appropriately)

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Here is a quick and dirty solution... should get you going right away.

public void EntryPoint(object template)
{
    TemplateA a = template as TemplateA;
    if (a != null)
    {
        myFunc(a); //calls myFunc(TemplateA template)
        return;
    }

    TemplateB b = template as TemplateB;
    if (b != null)
    {
        myFunc(b); //calls myFunc(TemplateB template)
        return;
    }

    myFunc(template); //calls myFunc(object template)
}

Also, see Jon Skeet's answer for some additional education.

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I assume you have considered using an abstract base class that has the myFunc method on it with concrete implementations in the sub-classes?

abstract public class BaseTemplate
{
    abstract protected void MyFunc();
}

public class TemplateA : BaseTemplate
{
    protected override void MyFunc()
    {
        DoSomething(this);
    }
}

public class TemplateB : BaseTemplate
{
    protected override void MyFunc()
    {
        DoSomethingElse(this);
    }
}

Then you'd change your entry point method to:

public void EntryPoint(BaseTemplate template)
{
    template.MyFunc();
}

Or if you want the parameter to stay object:

public void EntryPoint(object template)
{
    BaseTemplate temp = template as BaseTemplate;
    if (temp != null)
        temp.MyFunc();
    else
        throw new NotImplementedException(template.GetType());
}
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