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I wonder what is the difference between these two approaches. They both work but I don't understand if the 2nd approach might have undesirable implications?

// A. Putting a prototype method outside the function declaration (what I would normally do)
var Cat = function(){
}

Cat.prototype.eat = function(){
    // implementation
}

// B. Putting a prototype method inside the function declaration (it works too but the scoping seems different)
var Cat = function(){

    Cat.prototype.eat = function(){
        // implementation
    }   
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Every object has a prototype. Prototypical inheritance allows you to assign either an entirely new prototype (similar to the classical inheritance):

function Animal() {
    this.numLegs = 4;
}
function Cat() {
    // Implementation
}
Cat.prototype = new Animal();

var kitten = new Cat();
console.log(kitten.numLegs); // 4

Or directly add variables and methods to the current class's prototype:

function Cat() {
    // Implementation
}
Cat.prototype.numLegs = 4;

var kitten = new Cat();
console.log(kitten.numLegs); // 4

Your second example simply reassigns the eat function to the Cat prototype every time the Cat class is initiated, which is useless but doesn't take up any memory because it just overwrites the old value.

Why is this useful? Remember that functions are objects. For every instance of your class, each variable and function defined in that class takes up it's own memory. Using prototypical inheritance, you can share common methods, thus not taking up the extra memory for each instance.

Why is this not as useful? You don't have access to private variables.

Keep in mind that this is not the same thing as a static method, which can be declared as:

Cat.feed = function(kittens) {
    for (var kitten in kittens) {
        kitten.eat();
    }
};
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Thanks for all of your comments. I now remember why I messed around with this in the first place: I couldn't find a way of accessing private variables from the prototype function. And I now understand that you are not supposed to do that, because private variables are only accessible from the scope where they are created. If you need to access variables from the prototype they should be declared public using the 'this' keyword instead of 'var' –  ChristianSch Aug 7 '12 at 23:55

You probably want to do the first example. Both are doing the exact same thing, although technically the second function will have access to the Cat's "private" variables. However, if you want to do that, the correct way to do it is using this:

var Cat = function(){
    var a = 'hi';

    this.eat = function() {
        alert(a); // Exists!
    }
}

Keep in mind that with the above example, or with your original "B" example, the eat function will not exist until you instantiate a new Cat with new Cat(). Meaning, if you just want to call Cat.eat() on the function itself, like a utility method, then the first example with prototype is the way to go.

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Also the 2-nd example will mess up horribly when you create a few Cats because all of their eat methods will access the last Cat's "private" vars. –  Vatev Aug 7 '12 at 7:46
1  
haha, I didn't even consider that. that would make for some killer debugging. –  Andy Ray Aug 7 '12 at 7:57
    
@Vatev - you can't access "private" variables outside of the function they are declared in. Variables declared using this are public, and are accessible both in the constructor and in prototype methods as this.var. –  Wex Aug 7 '12 at 8:02
1  
@Wex "private" in this case are the variables which the eat function has access to via closure. To use that you need to have a separate instance of the eat function for every Cat (as in Andy's answer), but OP's second example uses a single instance for all the cats (it gets replaced with the last Cat's eat every time). –  Vatev Aug 7 '12 at 8:06

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