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The code:

public function couts_complets($chantier,$ponderation=100){

    function ponderation($n)
    {
        return($n*$ponderation/100); //this is line 86
    }

            ...

    }

What I'm trying to do: to declare a function B inside a function A in order to use it as a parameter in
array_map().

My problem: I get an error:

Undefined variable: ponderation [APP\Model\Application.php, line 86]

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You cannot declare a function inside a function in PHP. –  Tomalak Aug 7 '12 at 8:27
    
This construction is not possible in PHP. Move the ponderation function outside of the couts_complets function and just call it with your parameter. Also possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1631535/… –  Gerald Versluis Aug 7 '12 at 8:28
    
The docs seems to say otherwise: php.net/manual/en/functions.user-defined.php –  LSA Aug 7 '12 at 8:28
    
You can define a function in a function. see: codepad.viper-7.com/oc8EBn –  Nanne Aug 7 '12 at 8:29
1  
@Tomalak the very fact that this "broken" behaviour has been observed, recorded* and remained unchanged since very early in PHP's life weighs heavily against your point-of-view that this feature is merely a happy accident. We're not that focused on backwards compatibility. –  salathe Aug 7 '12 at 12:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

public function couts_complets($chantier,$ponderation=100){

    $ponderationfunc = function($n) use ($ponderation)
    {
        return($n*$ponderation/100);
    }

        ...
    $ponderationfunc(123);
}
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It works fine. Will accept in 4 mins. Thank you all! –  LSA Aug 7 '12 at 8:36

As of php 5.3 you can use anonymous functions. Your code would look like this (untested code warning):

public function couts_complets($chantier,$ponderation=100) {
    array_map($chantier, function ($n) use ($ponderation) {
        return($n*$ponderation/100); //this is line 86
    }
}
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In your current code, $ponderation is not covered by the scope of the function, hence the "undefined" error.

To pass a variable to an "internal" function, use the use statement.

function ponderation($n) use($ponderation) {
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't use only work for closures? –  Maerlyn Aug 7 '12 at 8:30
    
Hmm, possibly. I'd say that the method should be rewritten as a anonymous function in this situation regardless. –  Vulcan Aug 7 '12 at 8:35
    
It's only mentioned on the anonymous function's doc page, nowhere in page of the regular user-defined functions. –  Maerlyn Aug 7 '12 at 8:40

Using a callback function:

In order to use a function as a parameter in PHP it is enough to pass the function's name as a string as such:

array_map('my_function_name', $my_array);

If the function is actually a static method in a class you can pass it as a parameter as such:

array_map(array('my_class_name', 'my_method_name'), $my_array);

If the function is actually a non-static method in a class you can pass it as a parameter as such:

array_map(array($my_object, 'my_method_name'), $my_array);

Declaring a callback function:

If you declare in the global space all is good and clear in the world - for everybody.

If you declare it inside another function it will be global but it won't be defined until the parent function runs for the first time and it will trigger an error Cannot redefine function my_callback_function if you run the parent function again.

If you declare it as a lambda function / anonymous function you will need to specify which of the upper level scope variables it is allowed to see/use.

Calling a callback:

function my_api_function($callback_function) {
    // PHP 5.4:
    $callback_function($parameter1, $parameter2);

    // PHP < 5.3:
    if(is_string($callback_function)) {
        $callback_function($parameter1, $parameter2);
    }
    if(is_array($callback_function)) {
        call_user_func_array($callback_function, array($parameter1, $parameter2));
    }
}
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