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I'd like to implement some kind of duck typing using Jackson. I've already seen Example 6 here http://programmerbruce.blogspot.de/2011/05/deserialize-json-with-jackson-into.html. But this one does not work, if the base class itself is not abstract (results in an infinite loop). So my question is: Is there a way to implement some kind of callback, where I can do the duck typing (check for relevant attributes within the JSON String) and then return the type that Jackson should use to do the deserialization as usual?

Here's some example Code. It works for the subclass ExtendedOptions but not for the base class Options...

public class Options {

    private int size;

    public int getSize() {
        return size;
    }

    public void setSize(int size) {
        this.size = size;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Options";
    }
}

public class ExtendedOptions extends Options {

    private String feature;

    public String getFeature() {
        return feature;
    }
    public void setFeature(String feature) {
        this.feature = feature;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "ExtendedOptions";
    }

}

public class OptionsDeserializer extends
        StdDeserializer<Options> {

    OptionsDeserializer() {
        super(Options.class);
    }

    @Override
    public Options deserialize(JsonParser jp,
            DeserializationContext ctxt) throws IOException,
            JsonProcessingException {
        ObjectMapper mapper = (ObjectMapper) jp.getCodec();
        ObjectNode root = (ObjectNode) mapper.readTree(jp);
        Iterator<Entry<String, JsonNode>> elementsIterator = root.fields();
        while (elementsIterator.hasNext()) {
            Entry<String, JsonNode> element = elementsIterator.next();
            String name = element.getKey();
            // has "feature"? => It's an ExtendedOptions object
            if ("feature".equals(name)) {
                return mapper.treeToValue(root, ExtendedOptions.class);
            }
        }
        // otherwise it's just an Options object
        return mapper.treeToValue(root, Options.class);
    }

}

public class JacksonTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws JsonParseException,
            JsonMappingException, Exception {
        String optionsString = "{ \"size\": 5 }";
        String extendedOptionsString = "{ \"size\": 5, \"feature\" : \"theFeature\" }";

        OptionsDeserializer deserializer = new OptionsDeserializer();
        @SuppressWarnings("deprecation")
        SimpleModule module = new SimpleModule(
                "PolymorphicDeserializerModule", new Version(1, 0, 0,
                        null));
        module.addDeserializer(Options.class, deserializer);

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        mapper.registerModule(module);

        // works
        ExtendedOptions extendedOptions = (ExtendedOptions) mapper.readValue(extendedOptionsString, Options.class);
        System.out.println(extendedOptions);

        // results in infinite loop!!!
        Options options = mapper.readValue(optionsString, Options.class);
        System.out.println(options);
    }

}

Edit:

I've tried implementing a BeanDeserializerModifier according to StaxMan's hint. Here's the modifyDeserializer method:

@Override
public JsonDeserializer<?> modifyDeserializer(DeserializationConfig config,
        BeanDescription beanDesc, JsonDeserializer<?> deserializer) {       
    List<BeanPropertyDefinition> properties = beanDesc.findProperties();
    for(BeanPropertyDefinition property: properties) {
        String name = property.getName();
        // has "feature"? => It's an ExtendedOptions object
        System.out.println(name);
        if("feature".equals(name)) {
            System.out.println("It's an extended object!");
            // should return special deserializer here...
            return deserializer;
        }
    }
    System.out.println("It's not an extended object!");
    return deserializer;
}

That did not work, because beanDesc contains information on Option class only. That means you don't get any information on the current json stream, so you can't decide which Deserializer must be returned. However I've found a solution that works, but it's not 100% perfect:

@Override
public Options deserialize(JsonParser jp,
        DeserializationContext ctxt) throws IOException,
        JsonProcessingException {

    ObjectMapper mapper = (ObjectMapper) jp.getCodec();
    ObjectNode root = (ObjectNode) mapper.readTree(jp);

    Iterator<Entry<String, JsonNode>> elementsIterator = root.fields();
    while (elementsIterator.hasNext()) {
        Entry<String, JsonNode> element = elementsIterator.next();
        String name = element.getKey();
        // has "feature"? => It's an ExtendedOptions object
        if ("feature".equals(name)) {
            return mapper.treeToValue(root, ExtendedOptions.class);
        }
    }
    // otherwise it's just an Options object
    ObjectMapper origMapper = new ObjectMapper();       
    return origMapper.treeToValue(root, Options.class);
}

Here I simply create a new instance of ObjectMapper to deserialize the base type Options. As I said, it works. But:

1) It might be expensive to create a new instance of ObjectMapper (use static attribute?).

2) This solution will not work with nested polymorph objects. For example, if Options would contain an attribute that is itself polymorph.

So here's another question: Is there a way to unregister a deserializer? If so I could replace the last 2 lines with something like this:

mapper.unregister(this);
Options result = mapper.treeToValue(root, Options.class);
mapper.register(this);
return result;

Edit 2

Ok, you are right. Unregistering is not a good solution. I did not think of multi-threading ;-) Anyway, I tried this one:

@Override
public JsonDeserializer<?> modifyDeserializer(DeserializationConfig config,
        BeanDescription beanDesc, JsonDeserializer<?> deserializer) {       
    return new OptionsDeserializer();
}

But that leads me to the same infinite-loop.

share|improve this question
    
It might be easier to answer if you provided a code sample. I think that custom deserializer is the solution. I guess the problem is with addDeserializer call. –  Piotr Gwiazda Aug 7 '12 at 8:48
    
You're right! I just added a complete sample. –  DMA Aug 7 '12 at 10:10
    
It might be hard without one more supertype or interface. The line return mapper.treeToValue(root, Options.class); causes falling back to your deserializer. Maybe there is a method of lower level deserializing than treeToValue that will skip custom deserializers. –  Piotr Gwiazda Aug 7 '12 at 10:38
    
Correct. I searched the API for such a method but could not find one. Another idea was to use a new ObjectMapper instance. But that would disable all custom deserializers. –  DMA Aug 7 '12 at 12:42
    
No, you can not dynamically register/unregister deserializers, at least not currently. But due to multi-threaded usage, I don't think this would work in general, even if you could do that. –  StaxMan Aug 8 '12 at 15:15

1 Answer 1

There is no automatic support, although something like this (implicit type) has been requested, see Jira issue JACKSON-500.

One existing possibility that might work would be used of BeanDeserializerModifier: you would get access to standard JsonDeserializer that is built, but could then add your wrapper sort of around it. This would be done by defining modifyDeserializer(), which is given otherwise complete (default) JsonDeserializer; and then you can just build your own instance, passing that deserializer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that hint. I implemented a BeanDeserializerModifier but that didn't help either. –  DMA Aug 8 '12 at 14:03
    
Actually I meant slightly different way of using it: instead of determining it there (which you are right can't be done: it is called before actual parsing), you'd construct a fully custom JsonDeserializer, and in its deserialize() method you could determine type. I am not 100% sure this would work, but it should get you quite close... –  StaxMan Aug 8 '12 at 15:17

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