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So I asked a similar question earlier and I'm only more confused now, so I'll ask it in a different way...

What I'm trying to do is abstract my php and put the bits of html, used in my validator as error messages, into functions that return the html to the spot where they are needed in the page.

What I have right now is:

<section>
<?php 
if($errMsg)
{
    errMsg();
}
?>
</section>

<?php
function errMsg()
{
       ?>
       <section>
           <p>O crap!  There was an error</p>
       </section>
       <?php
}
?>

But in my previously mentioned question, I was told doing it this way is a 'dirty hack' and its better to use return in situations like this. But to use return I'd need to assign all of the returning html to a var and to do that I would need to put the html in a string. I'd rather avoid putting more than two lines of html in a string because of the pain in the butt number of quotes needed to do so.

So I'm thinking I either use the heredoc syntax or ob_start/ob_get_clean functions. What I'd like to know is.

1 Do I even need to bother with abstracting my code like this?
2 If so, which way is the best practices way to do it? And/Or
3 Should I just give up on web development and go back to pizza delivery? :-\

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7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I wouldn't return any HTML. Simply return the error message from the function and then build the html in a more appropriate place. For example the inside the template.

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  1. Yes definitely, you have no flexibility with the way you are doing it.
  2. You should separate all of your HTML from your PHP ideally, at least functions - the only place it is remotely acceptable is within a view which uses PHP just to display the output of the functions.
  3. Pizza! Just kidding, but there can never be enough pizza!?

Take a look at the Zend framework http://framework.zend.com/manual/en/zend.application.quick-start.html they forward error messages which aren't caught to an error handler, which then uses its own view to render the error.

Or w/o a framework:

try{
     //do work here and throw exception on error
}
catch (Exception $e)
{
     //do error logging/display error
     //or preferably load another class which handles your error and produces output
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please forgive my noobness, but when you say separate all of my HTML from my PHP, do you mean keep the different languages in different files? Like unobtrusive JavaScript? Because right now, just about all my my .php files are webpages with PHP written above the doctype. –  Freethinker Aug 7 '12 at 9:15
    
At the top of the file is fine, but I would not mix HTML with PHP directly, ie using <<<EOF or closing php tags to add HTML is asking for trouble when it comes to a re-design. Think to yourself when your coding - will this make my life difficult when it comes to re-designing my website? The likely answer given your examples is a clear yes ;-) –  williamvicary Aug 7 '12 at 9:35
    
Thank you for your answer. Now if mixing the PHP into the HTML using closing tags is a bad idea. How would you output anything from the PHP to the HTML? For example, if a form came back from the server with an error, how would you even keep the user's input in the input fields without using something like value="<?php $_POST['username'] ?>"? –  Freethinker Aug 7 '12 at 9:49
    
I would recommend the Zend_Form class which handles this for you (or a similar class) or build your own class which handled a specification and built the output for you. This way you have a lot of control over things such as filtering, validation etc. It's not necessarily bad to output plain variables in PHP code into your HTML, however if you start getting logic (such as if statements, for loops etc) it'll be a nightmare to maintain when it comes to re-designing and will lead to duplicated code (which is always bad!) –  williamvicary Aug 7 '12 at 10:02
    
Your logic just smacked me in the forehead and gave my an epiphany. So instead of using an if statement in my form to output something if a var is true, or calling a function from there. I could create a class in a separate script, create an object based on that class, and call the appropriate method from the object to do what I need to do at the spot where the if statement was at? Sorry if that doesn't make any sense but I'm still working on grasping how to do OOP in PHP. OOP in Actionscript 3 was way easier in my opinion... –  Freethinker Aug 7 '12 at 10:17

1: You don't need to, but you can if it's done properly.

2: To do this, i recommend you to use the EOF in your PHP error func, it looks like this :

function errMsg()
{
       $error = <<<EOF 
<section>
<p>O crap!  There was an error</p>
</section>
EOF;
}
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It isn't called EOF, it's called heredoc. –  vascowhite Aug 7 '12 at 9:04
    
You're right, but everybody understand with the EOF ;) –  PoulsQ Aug 7 '12 at 9:05
2  
That's a huge assumption. –  vascowhite Aug 7 '12 at 9:11

You could just do this:

<?php if($errMgs){ ?>
<section>
    <p><?php echo errMsg(); ?></p>
</section>
<?php } ?>

Generally, I try my best not to echo out HTML via PHP. Why? Because if a designer needs to work on my code, I don't want him/her worrying about what HTML my functions are spitting out.

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Move the html code into a separate file, error.php. After that you just capture the output:

function errMsg()
{
    ob_start();
    include '/path/to/error.php';
    return ob_get_clean();
}

// ...

echo errMsg();
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First off, I agree with the posts above. Don't format, just have the function return the bare error message and if you need to format it appropriately where you want to display it.

Secondly, I always find that it is useful to be able to turn error and testing messages on and off quickly. As the majority of my code is object orientated and I might only want to have messages popping from an object at a time, I normally have something like this in my classes:

class userObject
{
    public $history;// = historyObject;
    public $userName;
    public $userRelation;
    public $userCode;
    private $mySQLAccessData;
    private $isDebug=false;

    public function makeHistoryObject($KPI, $KPIType)
    {
        if($this->isDebug){echo "Having a go at creating ".$this->userName.".<br>";}
        $this->history = new historyObject($this->userCode, $KPI, $KPIType);
    }
}

I slip a private element in which I leave as false by default. If I need to debug or make changes, I set it to true and all my error/logging messages are neatly displayed on screen. I know that this isn't directly answering your question, but I do find that it is so handy it might be worth it for you when you start. It certainly beats commenting out and then uncommenting potentially dozens of messages. You can leave these outputs in the object without worrying and have them displaying all the detail you need.

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If you may at some point have number of errors, then do like this

<?php
$errors = array();

if (!$item = getItem($id)) {
    addError("No item $id");
}

if (!updateUser($user, $id)) {
    addError("Can not update user");
}

if (!updateItemPicture($id, $picture)) {
    addError("Can not add picture to $id");
}

function addError($error) {
    global $errors; $errors []= $error;
}

function hasErrors() {
   global $errors; return count($errors);
}

function printErrors() {
   if (!hasErrors()) return;

   print "<ul class='errors'><li>" . join("</li><li>", $errors) . "</li></ul";
}


printErrors();
?>

This is in case you are not using object oriented way. And assuming that all errors are not fatal and caught in try {} catch () {} blocks.

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