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I have a text file in which has only one column. What I need is to split the only column to a few columns. For example, assume my file consists of :

10

20

30

40

50

e

1467

1608

1733

1767

1878

e

1787

1353

1024

693

423

I need it to become as below:

10 1467 1787

20 1608 1353

30 1733 1024

40 1767 693

50 1878 423

Just was wondering if you help me to do it with a Python script. In addition, if I can do it by writing some commands in OS X terminal, please let me know.

share|improve this question
    
you want to turn split it into a colum every time "e" is reached? can you post some of your code, "what have you tried?" also, is that the full list? –  Inbar Rose Aug 7 '12 at 9:04
    
also - please explain how the items are split in this file? are they listed with spaces in between? new lines? commas? –  Inbar Rose Aug 7 '12 at 9:18
1  
I think this is a good example of the kind of question where "what have you tried" is an appropriate response. I don't envision SO as a website people can go to when they have a small task they want a program for for free. –  JosefAssad Aug 7 '12 at 9:40
    
please improve the formatting of your question. You may want to use the <.pre> <./pre> tags for that purpose. –  moooeeeep Aug 7 '12 at 10:26

3 Answers 3

Here is an example of what it's possible to do with list comprehensions and the itertools module.

>>> from itertools import dropwhile, izip, takewhile
>>> l = ['1', '2', 'X', '3', '4', 'X', '5', '6']
>>> splitter = 'X'
>>> fun = lambda e: e != 'X'
>>> begin = [e for e in takewhile(fun, l)]
>>> end = [e for e in dropwhile(fun, l)][1:]
>>> begin, end
(['1', '2'], ['3', '4', 'X', '5', '6'])
>>> # OUT: (['1', '2'], ['3', '4', 'X', '5', '6'])
>>> mid = [e for e in takewhile(fun, end)]
>>> end = [e for e in dropwhile(fun, end)][1:]
>>> begin, mid, end
(['1', '2'], ['3', '4'], ['5', '6'])
>>> # OUT: (['1', '2'], ['3', '4'], ['5', '6'])
>>> [e for e in izip(begin, mid, end)]
[('1', '3', '5'), ('2', '4', '6')]
>>> # OUT: [('1', '3', '5'), ('2', '4', '6')]

Of course, if the original list has a variable length, it is necessary to do this work in a loop.

I recommend you to test this kind of statements in a BPython interpreter so you can easily test interactive examples.

share|improve this answer
    
great comment! thank you @Alexis! –  Zagorulkin Dmitry Aug 7 '12 at 9:29
    
and special thanks for bpython link! –  Zagorulkin Dmitry Aug 7 '12 at 9:31

You can split the content of an entire file into a list using:

def read_data(filename):
    with open(filename) as f:
        return f.read().split()

Running data = read_data('test.txt') using a text.txt that contains:

10
20
30
e
11
21
31
e
12
22
32

Will result in:

data = ['10', '20', '30', 'e', '11', '21', '31', 'e', '12', '22', '32']

NOTE: test.txt can be formatted with spaces, tabs and newlines in any way as split() will handle them correctly!

The data should really be in a 2D array that does not contain the 'e' entries. This can be done using the following:

def list_to_grid(data):
    ret  = []
    line = []
    for entry in data:
        if entry == 'e':
            if len(line) != 0:
                ret.append(line)
                line = []
            else:
                line.append(int(entry))
    if len(line) != 0:
        ret.append(line)
    return ret

NOTE: I'm sure there's a more Pythonic way of doing this, but it works.

Running data = list_to_grid(read_data('test.txt')) on the text.txt file will result in:

data = [[10, 20, 30], [11, 21, 31], [12, 22, 32]]

What you are doing is transposing the 2D array. That is, given data[i][j], it has the new position data[j][i]. Now this data can be transposed to get the desired sequence:

def transpose(data):
    ret = []
    for i in range(0, len(data)):
        ret.append([data[j][i] for j in range(0, len(data[i]))])
    return ret

Which for tdata = transpose(data) gives:

 data = [[10, 20, 30], [11, 21, 31], [12, 22, 32]]
tdata = [[10, 11, 12], [20, 21, 22], [30, 31, 32]]

Now print it out:

def print_data(data):
    for line in data:
        print ' '.join([str(x) for x in line])

Using print_data(tdata) results in:

10 11 12
20 21 22
30 31 32

Which is what you wanted.

share|improve this answer

Note: Modified to reflect changed data formats

Based on your (new) sample data using 'e' as the group delimiter. The basic idea is to iterate over the lines in the file grouping as it goes and starting a new group whenever the delimiter is seen.

# testdata contains:
10
20
30
40
50
e
1467
1608
1733
1767
1878
e
1787
1353
1024
693
423

_

DELIMITER = 'e'
groups = []
this_group = []
for l in open('testdata', 'r'):
    l = l.strip()
    if l == DELIMITER and this_group:
        groups.append(this_group)
        this_group = []
    else:
        this_group.append(l)
if this_group:
    groups.append(this_group)

for t in zip(*groups):
    print ' '.join(t)

10 1467 1787
20 1608 1353
30 1733 1024
40 1767 693
50 1878 423
share|improve this answer
    
Apologize to all. I edited my previous post since items were presented in a row rather than in a column !!!. I was wondering if you take a look at my edited question and guide me based on that...Indeed, I'm sorry for my fault. I was not familiar how to post a column of items in my post since it was presented as a row of elements in my previous question :-). There is no space between individual items in the consecutive rows meaning that there is no space between 10, 20, 30, etc... –  user1581399 Aug 7 '12 at 9:42
    
Why Python does not have the ability to play with columns ?. For example, we cannot have a "for" loop that iterates over columns whereas we can simply iterate over lines by the following statement : for line in file_1.readlines(): –  user1581399 Aug 7 '12 at 10:11
    
@user1581399: Answer updated to reflect your revised data format. –  mhawke Aug 7 '12 at 11:34
    
@mhawke The file handle will leak in your example. It is better to use with open('testdata') as f: for l in f: ... as that will ensure f is closed even on exceptions. –  reece Aug 7 '12 at 11:55
    
Thanks @reece , but as you say it is just an example, not bullet proof code... I got a bit lazy. Let's "leave it as an exercise" for the reader. –  mhawke Aug 7 '12 at 12:01

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