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I have a few pyparsing tokens defined as follows:

field = Word(alphas + "_").setName("field")

Is there really no shorthand for this?

Furthermore, this does not seem to work, the dictionary returned by expression.parseString() is always an empty one.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are confusing setName and setResultsName. setName assigns a name to the expression so that exception messages are more meaningful. Compare:

>>> integer1 = Word(nums)
>>> integer1.parseString('x')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "c:\python26\lib\site-packages\pyparsing-1.5.6-py2.6.egg\pyparsing.py", line 1032, in parseString
    raise exc
pyparsing.ParseException: Expected W:(0123...) (at char 0), (line:1, col:1)

and:

>>> integer2 = Word(nums).setName("integer")
>>> integer2.parseString('x')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "c:\python26\lib\site-packages\pyparsing-1.5.6-py2.6.egg\pyparsing.py", line 1032, in parseString
    raise exc
pyparsing.ParseException: Expected integer (at char 0), (line:1, col:1)

setName gives a name to the expression itself.

setResultsName on the other hand gives a name to the parsed data that is returned, like named fields in a regex.

>>> expr = integer.setResultsName('age') + integer.setResultsName('credits')
>>> data = expr.parseString('20 110')
>>> print data.dump()
['20', '110']
- age: 20
- credits: 110

And as @Kimvais has mentioned, there is a shortcut for setResultsName:

>>> expr = integer('age') + integer('credits')

Note also that setResultsName returns a copy of the expression - that is the only way that using the same expression multiple times with different names works.

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Thanks. - wonder why the name is not the variable name by default... –  Kimvais Aug 7 '12 at 15:00
2  
A common request, but that is a Python issue, not a pyparsing one. expr = Word(nums); number=expr Now number and expr both point to the same expression. Now do expr.parseString('123') the object does not know what its own name is, and trying to walk through locals() to find out will give both expr and number. –  Paul McGuire Aug 7 '12 at 15:13

field = Word(alphas + "_")("field")

seems to work.

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