Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have seen a few questions talk around this topic, but I think I'm having a more fundamental lack of how to best use try/catch blocks beyond the most basic examples.

In this specific case, I have a series of techniques to solve a problem, going from simple to fairly complicated, and what I have in mind is something like:

if ($zombie_killer -> board_with_nail == 'failed') {
    if ($zombie_killer -> machette == 'failed') {
       if ($zombie_killer -> shotgun == 'failed') {
           $this -> panic;
       }
    }
}

But instead, I thought it might be a better approach to use a try/catch block so that there is more room for adding on custom sub-processes, such as logging why the technique didn't work, updating a UI to reflect "a longer than usual hold time", or whatever. So I guess it would be something like:

try {
    $zombie_killer -> board_with_nail;
}
catch(Exception $e) {
    try {
        $zombie_killer -> machette;
    }
}

But this doesn't feel much better, and given all the blowback others have gotten with the "what's better if/else vs try/catch" I'm pretty clear that at the very least, there are big differences and reasons to use them. Which is why I'm asking about this use case, because I feel like it's best handled by a try/catch, but can't figure out if it feels off because I haven't really used them much or because I'm not approaching this correctly.

share|improve this question
    
Is there any reason not to use if(($zombie_killer -> board_with_nail == 'failed') && ($zombie_killer -> machette == 'failed') && ($zombie_killer -> shotgun == 'failed')) ? – Mahn Aug 7 '12 at 10:06

As a personnal point of view, I think that, unlike if/else, try/catch are there to handle exceptions, not use cases, so they are better used for that, not for handling what you want to do depending on a situation.

share|improve this answer

Exceptions are not an alternative way to represent conditional statements. Exceptions are for, well, exceptional situations, like trying to kill a zombie with a pillow:

function kill_zombie($weapon) {
    if (!$weapon instanceof FireArm && !$weapon instanceof HeavyObject)
        throw new Exception("Zombies can only be killed with firearms and heavy objects");
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Okay, this is making sense, especially when tying it back to elxordi's example of the readDatabase multi-catches, where it's not nesting the tries, it's accounting for various exceptions the one method might throw. But using the chained if(!$zombie_killer-> board && !$zombie_killer -> machette) might be tighter, I'm trying to keep the options loose, as it's more important in my mind that the individual techniques work (or otherwise are open to being handled) and that I have a method that is a one-shot "suggested use" combo, but keeping the specifics public or at least protected, so that.. – Anthony Aug 7 '12 at 10:32
    
...other combos or just one-off attempts can be tried. Maybe I'm mistaking exception throwing as solution for opening up the method to being "subscribe-ready" or "loose" in that I want those that implement the library to also be able to fire sub-routines based on any given outcome. So maybe if $zombie_killer -> shotgun fails, they can reload and try again, or output a message to the user, or an animation, or give an option to quit. Basically I like the idea that it's a series of "attempts" or "tries" which seem stateful rather than conditions which seem stateless. or am i just being weird? – Anthony Aug 7 '12 at 10:39
    
Just improved my answer. Btw, please, choose a final correct answer. – elxordi Aug 14 '12 at 9:36

The philosophy of try/catch isn't the one you described. The good way to use it is to catch different exceptions depending of what error happened. For example:

try {
    $value = readDatabase();
    writeDatabase($++value);
} catch (ReadErrorException $e) {
    // do something
} catch (WriteErrorException $e) {
    // do something
}

If you want to achieve what you're looking for, you can do as simple as using and, if you don't need more code. If you do, just use elseif.

For example, your code could become:

if (
    $zombie_killer -> board_with_nail == 'failed'
    && $zombie_killer -> machette == 'failed'
    && $zombie_killer -> shotgun == 'failed'
) {
    $this -> panic;
}

Also, the good way would be, using booleans as attributes:

if (
    !$zombie_killer -> board_with_nail
    && !$zombie_killer -> machette
    && !$zombie_killer -> shotgun
) {
    $this -> panic;
}

EDIT: After reading your comments on other answers

I propose you an alternative solution, based on what you said. Understanding that $zombie_killer is a class, you could create a public method named, for example, kill(). This method can access the public, private and protected attributes of the class.

I will write an example without exceptions first.

Inside the class:

public function kill()
{
    if ($zombie_killer -> board_with_nail != 'failed') return true;
    if ($zombie_killer -> machette != 'failed') return true;
    if ($zombie_killer -> shotgun != 'failed') return true;

    return false;
}

In the other file, the one we were talking about:

if (!$zombie_killer->kill()) {
   $this->panic;
}

As you can see, the code is more clean, and the default behaviour of the function is suppose that the zombie won't be killed, and the exceptional cases would be if one of the methods used to kill the zombie succeeds. It's the opposite as how we would normally think: we would suppose we could kill the zombie, and the exceptional case would be if everything failed. But it's just a philosophical issue, you can reverse the code and it would still work.

Let's see the same with exceptions.

Class file:

public function kill()
{
    if (
        $zombie_killer -> board_with_nail == 'failed' 
        && $zombie_killer -> machette == 'failed'
        && $zombie_killer -> shotgun == 'failed'
    ) {
        throw new NotKilledException();
    }
}

Other file:

try {
    $zombie_killer->kill();
} catch (Exception $e) {
    $this->panic;
}

So, you see? The exception version isn't of much help in this case, because you still must do the nested if, because the condition must accomplish three different types of kills failed. The exception is to not kill the zombie. Because you want the exceptional code $this->panic to be executed.

Now, you must choose what kind of implementation fits you more. The both are correct, and developers will see it right both. I would choose though, the first one, cause with a simple copy paste you could add more killing types to your zombie_killer, and it's cleaner to read.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.