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i've created a swing jtable with some data from a database. in web apps, usually i display the data to the user and set it's unique database id in as an html tag attribute, so that when the user clicks on say edit, i pick the element's hidden db unique id from the html tag attribute using javascript. That way, i know which data user wants to edit and i can update it in the database using it's unique primary key. Now how do i do this in a desktop app writen in java using swing. Put it more clearly, am looking for an equivalent of;

<table>
<tr id=1 ><td>david</td></tr>
<tr id=2 ><td>peter</td></tr>
<tr id=3 ><td>Timothy</td></tr>
</table>

Hope am clear. Thanks

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2 Answers 2

Your TableModel which backs up the JTable can contain anything you like. It can for example contain objects like

class User{
  public final int ID;
  public String name;
  public int age;
}

and you can then choose to only include certain values in your JTable

class MyTableModel implements TableModel{
  private List<User> users;
  @Override
  public Object getValueAt(int row, int column){
    if ( column == 0 ){
      return users.get( row ).name;
    }
  }
}

But since your TableModel still contains the full User objects, you have all the required information.

Note: the above code will not compile due to missing methods, ... . It is just here to illustrate what I mean

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THanks Robin. Let me try it out. –  David Okwii Aug 7 '12 at 11:57

The equivalent is an AbstractTableModel subclass instance backed by a List<YourObject>. When you edit a row, you get the index of the selected row from the table (JTable.getSelectedRow()), then you convert this row index to a model row index (JTable. convertRowIndexToModel()), then you ask your model for the YourObject at this row, and you get the ID of YourObject directly from the object.

Read the JTable tutorial for more details.

public class UserTableModel extends AbstractTableModel {

    private List<User> users;

    public UserTableModel(List<User> users) {
        this.users = new ArrayList<User>(users);
    }

    @Override
    public int getRowCount() {
        return users.size();
    }

    @Override
    public int getColumnCount() {
        return 1;
    }

    @Override
    public Object getValueAt(int rowIndex, int columnIndex) {
        if (columnIndex == 0) {
            return users.get(rowIndex).getName();
        }
        else {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public Class<?> getColumnClass(int columnIndex) {
        if (columnIndex == 0) {
            return String.class;
        }
        else {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        }
    }

    public User getUserAtRow(int rowIndex) {
        return users.get(rowIndex);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks JB Nizet. Can see it requires a complete different kind of thinking! Let me try out your example. It's my first time to develop on desktop. –  David Okwii Aug 7 '12 at 11:55
    
JB, the constructor of UserTableModel is supposed to take on an arraylist of user objects, right? Then in that case in the constructor, this.users = users; where users is an arraylist of user objects and not this.users = new ArrayList<User>(users); Correct me if am wrong. Thanks –  David Okwii Aug 7 '12 at 13:47
    
It's supposed to take a List as argument. It could be a LinkedList, in which case using the list to back the table model would lead to awful performance. The caller could also change the list after passing it to the model (sort it, remove all its elements, etc.). To be on the safe side, I made a defensive copy of the list. If you're sure it's an ArrayList, and if you're sure nobody will modify the list behind the back of the model, then no problem, you can assign the reference directly. –  JB Nizet Aug 7 '12 at 13:51
    
Alright, thanks –  David Okwii Aug 7 '12 at 13:58

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