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Quote from the GAE documentation:

An owned relationship can be "dependent," meaning that the child cannot exist without its parent. If a relationship is dependent and a parent object is deleted, all child objects are also deleted.

So if an owned relationship is not dependent it means, that if the parent entity is deleted it doesn't affect child entities. But it shouldn't be possible according to another quote from the documentation:

This association between an entity and its parent is permanent, and cannot be changed once the entity is created.

If I understand the documentation correctly, the point of un/owned relationships is that owned relationships are for entities in the same entity group, unowned relationships are fro entities from different entity groups, right? The entity group has a tree-like hierarchical structure, so having a not dependent owned relationship means that it would be possible to delete the root entity of the entity group without deleting the child entities... and it doesn't make sense.

So how does it really work?

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1 Answer 1

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This association between an entity and its parent is permanent, and cannot be changed once the entity is created.

This only means that you can not change parent of an entity, by replacing it with another parent or removing the relationship.

However, you can delete the parent entity altogether, but this does not change entity's Entity Group: What is the effect of deleting an entity's ancestor on its path?

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Thank you. I was thinking about entity groups really like about hierarchical structure of folders where naturally it's not possible to delete the root folder without deleting everything it contains. Apparently the entity group structure is not that strict. –  tobik Aug 7 '12 at 12:26

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