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What are Java's equivalents of Func and Action?

I mean, instead of writing this on my own:

public interface Func<TInput, TResult>
{
    TResult call(TInput target) throws Exception;
}
public interface Action<T>
{
    void call(T target) throws Exception;
}
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Also see stackoverflow.com/questions/7296606/… –  nawfal Jul 4 at 7:10

6 Answers 6

Callable interface is similar to Func.

Runnable interface is similar to Action.

In general, Java uses anonymous inner classes as a replacement for C# delegates. For example this is how you add code to react to button press in GUI:

button.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
      public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { 
          ...//code that reacts to the action... 
      }
});
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5  
What distinguishes Func from Callable, is that there are generic overloads for up to 16 arguments (Func<TResult>, Func<T, TResult>, Func<T1, T2, TResult>, etc.). OTOH, Callable takes no arguments. Moreover, it is impossible to implement C#'s overloads because of type erasure in generics. –  Aleksandr Dubinsky Apr 14 '13 at 11:12

Java doesn't have the concept of delegates. For a workaround approach, please see A Java Programmer Looks at C# Delegates:

While C# has a set of capabilities similar to Java, it has added several new and interesting features. Delegation is the ability to treat a method as a first-class object. A C# delegate is used where Java developers would use an interface with a single method. In this article, the use of delegates in C# is discussed, and code is presented for a Java Delegate object that can perform a similar function. Download the source code here.

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The elegance of the overloaded Func delegates (besides the delegate vs anonymous class issue) is that they support from 0 to 16 arguments (Func<TResult>, Func<T, TResult>, Func<T1, T2, TResult>, etc.)

Unfortunately, this is impossible in Java because of type erasure. Classes cannot differ by generic type parameters alone.

Edit: Java 8 now brings in a zoo of names like BiConsumer for Action<T, T2> and, because Java does not allow primitive type arguments, BiIntConsumer. The "zoo", though, is not very big, and I am not aware of a library that expands it. There was a wonderful proposal for function type literals like (int, int) => void but it was not adopted.

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2  
Interestingly, at the CLR level classes which differ only by the number of generic parameters do have different names. Func`1 etc. It's just C# that maps those to the same name. –  CodesInChaos Apr 14 '13 at 11:44
    
@CodesInChaos Ahh, very interesting. Too bad Java did not do it this way too. Btw, Java 8 now brings in a zoo of names like BiConsumer for Action<T, T2> and, because Java does not allow primitive type parameters, BiIntConsumer. There was a proposal for function type literals like (int, int) => void but it was not adopted. –  Aleksandr Dubinsky May 4 at 9:46

There really are no equivalents for those. You can create anonymous inner classes in Java, but there tends to be specific interfaces rather than such generic ones like Func and Action.

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In Java 8, the equivalents are the java.util.function.Function<T, R> and java.util.function.Consumer<T> interfaces respectively. Similarly, java.util.function.Predicate<T> is equivalent to System.Predicate<T>. As mentioned elsewhere, these are interfaces instead of delegates.

Related aside: I'm currently leaning heavily on the following utility class to do LINQ-like extension method stuff:

abstract class IterableUtil {
  public static <T> Iterable<T> where(Iterable<T> items, Predicate<T> predicate) {
    ArrayList<T> result = new ArrayList<T>();
    for (T item : items) {
      if (predicate.test(item)) {
        result.add(item);
      }
    }
    return result;
  }

  public static <T, R> Iterable<R> select(Iterable<T> items, Function<T, R> func) {
    ArrayList<R> result = new ArrayList<R>();
    for (T item : items) {
      result.add(func.apply(item));
    }
    return result;
  }
}

Unlike System.Linq.Enumerable.Where<TSource> and System.Linq.Enumerable.Select<TSource, TResult> the LINQ-like methods I present here are not lazy and fully traverse the source collections before returning the result collections to the caller. Still, I find them useful for purely syntactic purposes and could be made lazy if necessary. Given

class Widget {
  public String name() { /* ... */ }
}

One can do the following:

List<Widget> widgets = /* ... */;
Iterable<Widget> filteredWidgets = IterableUtil.select(widgets, w -> w.name().startsWith("some-prefix"));

Which I prefer to the following:

List<Widget> widgets = /* ... */;
List<Widget> filteredWidgets = new ArrayList<Widget>();
for (Widget w : widgets) {
  if (w.name().startsWith("some-prefix")) {
    filteredWidgets.add(w);
  }
}
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@Richard Cook: To continue with your sidetrack about a LINQ-like syntax, I don't know if you need the IterableUtil. Java 8 has some LINQ-like functionality via the new stream approach.

Some examples: https://github.com/codecentric/java8-examples/blob/master/src/main/java/de/codecentric/java8examples/streaming/CollectingAndReducing.java

widgets.stream().filter(w -> w.name().startsWith("some-prefix")).collect(Collectors.toList());

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Thanks for the pointers! I'll check it out. –  Richard Cook May 6 at 21:39

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