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If the code is the same, there appears to be a difference between:

include 'external.php';

and

eval('?>' . file_get_contents('external.php') . '<?php');

What is the difference? Does anybody know?


I know the two are different because the include works fine and the eval gives an error. When I originally asked the question, I wasn't sure whether it gave an error on all code or just on mine (and because the code was evaled, it was very hard to find out what the error meant). However, after having researched the answer, it turns out that whether or not you get the error does not depend on the code in the external.php, but does depend on your php settings (short_open_tag to be precise).

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1  
Thanks for this question. It helped with this: github.com/tedivm/Stash/pull/135 –  CMCDragonkai Mar 15 at 17:52
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6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

After some more research I found out what was wrong myself. The problem is in the fact that <?php is a "short opening tag" and so will only work if short_open_tag is set to 1 (in php.ini or something to the same effect). The correct full tag is <?php, which has a space after the second p.

As such the proper equivalent of the include is:

eval('?>' . file_get_contents('external.php') . '<?php ');

Alternatively, you can leave the opening tag out all together (as noted in the comments below):

eval('?>' . file_get_contents('external.php'));

My original solution was to add a semicolon, which also works, but looks a lot less clean if you ask me:

eval('?>' . file_get_contents('external.php') . '<?php;');
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thanks for the semicolon trick, it was driving me nuts! –  amrtn Aug 31 '09 at 7:05
1  
isn't eval("?>".file_get_contents('external.php')); the same as include 'external.php'; ?? –  Timo Huovinen Mar 25 '10 at 19:17
    
YuriKolovsky, you are right leaving out the the php-opening tag is an alternative to following it up with a semicolon. –  Jasper Apr 14 '10 at 0:23
    
may i ask why you appended '?>' and '<?php;' ? Btw, Mine produced an error when I used '<?php;'. I fixed it by removing the 'php' part. –  kapitanluffy May 27 '12 at 12:14
    
@kapitanluffy: include processes the file, which means it starts in "text mode" (as opposed to "php mode", where in php mode the code is executed and in "text mode" the text is simply copied to the output), while eval starts in "php mode". I dropped out of php mode in the eval case so it would do the same as include. –  Jasper Jun 20 '12 at 16:25
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AFAIK you can't take advantage of php accelerators if you use eval().

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AFAIK you have to have a real file on filesystem. –  niteria Jul 26 '09 at 21:36
    
...and you shouldn't be concerned about it unless you have performance problem. –  niteria Jul 26 '09 at 21:43
    
I meant that AFAIK php accelerators only work with real files on filesystem. Building for php accelerators will most likely complicate your code (you have to check if files are writable etc.) and it is possible it wouldn't make any visible improvement. If they're just template files, my guess is that it won't change anything. –  niteria Jul 26 '09 at 22:14
    
@niteria Just wanted to point out that you say AFAIK too much. –  leek Oct 11 '10 at 6:37
    
I decided to remove (my part of) the discussion that was taking up way too much space here. This answer answers the original phrasing of the question, though I don't believe it answers the essence of it (which remained the same). The discussion was also about things not in the question (stream wrappers). Finally, the point about being wary of the inability to use an opcode cache (and since php 5.5 there's one built-in in php) with eval is a good one, though it might be more of a comment than an answer with the current phrasing. –  Jasper Sep 23 '13 at 0:40
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If you are using a webserver on which you have installed an opcode cache, like APC, eval will not be the "best solution" : eval'd code is not store in the opcode cache, if I remember correctly (and another answer said the same thing, btw).

A solution you could use, at least if the code is not often changed, is get a mix of code stored in database and included code :

  • when necessary, fetch the code from DB, and store it in a file on disk
  • include that file
  • as the code is now in a file, on disk, opcode cache will be able to cache it -- which is better for performances
  • and you will not need to make a request to the DB each time you have to execute the code.

I've worked with software that uses this solution (the on-disk file being no more than a cache of the code stored in DB), and I worked not too bad -- way better that doing loads of DB requests of each page, anyway...

Some not so good things, as a consequence :

  • you have to fetch the code from the DB to put it in the file "when necessary"
    • this could mean re-generating the temporary file once every hour, or deleting it when the entry in DB is modified ? Do you have a way to identify when this happens ?
  • you also have to change your code, to use the temporary file, or re-generate it if necessary
    • if you have several places to modifiy, this could mean some work

BTW : would I dare saying something like "eval is evil" ?

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I'm sorry but your suggestion is completely irrelevant. I am writing some software and I made it so that it would only use files. I wanted to provide an alternative by the use of a database for when writing files is not an option, thus I ended up with this. However, we are only talking about one db query and one eval statement. And the speed is not all that bad: 1 : 2 for include from file : include from db, 10 : 8 for include from db : eval from db. Anyway, I do wonder whether a include from db does get cached... Oh, and the reason I came here was that missing semi-colon driving me crazy –  Jasper Jul 26 '09 at 15:20
    
OK, then ; sorry about that ^^ –  Pascal MARTIN Jul 26 '09 at 17:03
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This lets you include a file assuming file wrappers for includes is on in PHP:

function stringToTempFileName($str)
{
    if (version_compare(PHP_VERSION, '5.1.0', '>=') && strlen($str < (1024 * 512))) {
        $file = 'data://text/plain;base64,' . base64_encode($str);
    } else {
        $file = Utils::tempFileName();
        file_put_contents($file, $str);
    }
    return $file;
}

... Then include that 'file.' Yes, this will also disable opcode caches, but it makes this 'eval' the same as an include with respect to behavior.

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Your statement is even more irrelevant. I was simply offering a workaround re: the slight differences in behavior between eval() and include() language constructs. Your (ungrateful) complaint only indicates that you fail to perceive the fact that this is a community where others can benefit from thoughtful comments left by a well-meaning programmer who does perceive the same. You're not the only programmer in this world. fail(); –  Jaimie Sirovich Apr 16 '10 at 23:45
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Only eval('?>' . file_get_contents('external.php')); variant is correct replacement for include.

See tests:

<?php
$includes = array(
    'some text',
    '<?php print "some text"; ?>',
    '<?php print "some text";',
    'some text<?php',
    'some text<?php ',
    'some text<?php;',
    'some text<?php ?>',
    '<?php ?>some text',
);

$tempFile = tempnam('/tmp', 'test_');

print "\r\n" . "Include:" . "\r\n";
foreach ($includes as $include)
{
    file_put_contents($tempFile, $include);
    var_dump(include $tempFile);
}

unlink($tempFile);

print "\r\n" . "Eval 1:" . "\r\n";
foreach ($includes as $include)
    var_dump(eval('?>' . $include . '<?php '));

print "\r\n" . "Eval 2:" . "\r\n";
foreach ($includes as $include)
    var_dump(eval('?>' . $include));

print "\r\n" . "Eval 3:" . "\r\n";
foreach ($includes as $include)
    var_dump(eval('?>' . $include . '<?php;'));

Output:

Include:
some textint(1)
some textint(1)
some textint(1)
some text<?phpint(1)
some textint(1)
some text<?php;int(1)
some textint(1)
some textint(1)

Eval 1:
some textNULL
some textNULL
bool(false)
some text<?phpNULL
bool(false)
some text<?php;NULL
some textNULL
some textNULL

Eval 2:
some textNULL
some textNULL
some textNULL
some text<?phpNULL
some textNULL
some text<?php;NULL
some textNULL
some textNULL

Eval 3:
some text<?php;NULL
some text<?php;NULL
bool(false)
some text<?php<?php;NULL
bool(false)
some text<?php;<?php;NULL
some text<?php;NULL
some text<?php;NULL
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As noted by @bwoebi in this answer to my question, the eval substitution does not respect the file path context of the included file. As a test case:

Baz.php:

<?php return __FILE__;

Foo.php:

<?php
echo eval('?>' . file_get_contents('Baz.php',  FILE_USE_INCLUDE_PATH)) . "\n";
echo (include 'Baz.php') . "\n";

Result of executing php Foo.php:

$ php Foo.php 
/path/to/file/Foo.php(2) : eval()'d code
/path/to/file/Baz.php

I don't know of any way to change the __FILE__ constant and friends at runtime, so I do not think there is any general way to define include in terms of eval.

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