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I need to check a given byte or series of bytes for a particular sequence of bits as follows:

  • Can start with zero or more number of 0s.
  • Can start with zero or more number of 1s.
  • Must contain at least one 0 at the end.

In other words, if the value of bytes is not 0, then we are only interested in values that contain consecutive 1s followed by at least one 0 at the end.

I wrote the following code to do just that but wanted to make sure that it highly optimized. I feel that the multiple checks within the if branches could be optimized but am not sure how. Please advise.

// The parameter [number] will NEVER be negative.
public static bool ConformsToPattern (System.Numerics.BigInteger number)
{
    byte [] bytes = null;
    bool moreOnesPossible = true;

    if (number == 0) // 00000000
    {
        return (true); // All bits are zero.
    }
    else
    {
        bytes = number.ToByteArray();

        if ((bytes [bytes.Length - 1] & 1) == 1)
        {
            return (false);
        }
        else
        {
            for (byte b=0; b < bytes.Length; b++)
            {
                if (moreOnesPossible)
                {
                    if
                    (
                        (bytes [b] == 1) // 00000001
                        || (bytes [b] == 3) // 00000011
                        || (bytes [b] == 7) // 00000111
                        || (bytes [b] == 15) // 00001111
                        || (bytes [b] == 31) // 00011111
                        || (bytes [b] == 63) // 00111111
                        || (bytes [b] == 127) // 01111111
                        || (bytes [b] == 255) // 11111111
                    )
                    {
                        // So far so good. Continue to the next byte with
                        // a possibility of more consecutive 1s.
                    }
                    else if
                    (
                        (bytes [b] == 128) // 10000000
                        || (bytes [b] == 192) // 11000000
                        || (bytes [b] == 224) // 11100000
                        || (bytes [b] == 240) // 11110000
                        || (bytes [b] == 248) // 11111000
                        || (bytes [b] == 252) // 11111100
                        || (bytes [b] == 254) // 11111110
                    )
                    {
                        moreOnesPossible = false;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        return (false);
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    if (bytes [b] > 0)
                    {
                        return (false);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return (true);
}

IMPORTANT: The argument [number] sent to the function will NEVER be negative so no need to check for the sign bit.

share|improve this question
    
I'm sorry, I couldn't understand that //Continue. That if means not valid, right? –  Andre Calil Aug 7 '12 at 12:56
    
I'll update the question. It means VALID so far and the loop should continue to the next byte. The loop will return false on the first sign of non-conformance. –  Raheel Khan Aug 7 '12 at 13:01
    
But shouldn't the last bit be 0? –  Andre Calil Aug 7 '12 at 13:04
    
so your sequence must only either be 0, or consecutive 1's followed by at least 1 zero? Please add a couple failing cases to your question. –  hometoast Aug 7 '12 at 13:20
    
@RaheelKhan Could you give a try at my answer too? =) –  Andre Calil Aug 7 '12 at 14:24
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about something like this? If you find a one, the only things after that can be 1s until a 0 is found. After that, only 0s. This looks like it'll do the trick a little faster because it doesn't do unnecessary or conditions.

// The parameter [number] will NEVER be negative.
public static bool ConformsToPattern (System.Numerics.BigInteger number)
{
    byte [] bytes = null;
    bool moreOnesPossible = true;
    bool foundFirstOne = false;

    if (number == 0) // 00000000
    {
        return (true); // All bits are zero.
    }
    else
    {
        bytes = number.ToByteArray();

        if ((bytes [bytes.Length - 1] & 1) == 1)
        {
            return (false);
        }
        else
        {
            for (byte b=0; b < bytes.Length; b++)
            {
                if (moreOnesPossible)
                {
                    if(!foundFirstOne)
                    {
                        if
                        (
                            (bytes [b] == 1) // 00000001
                            || (bytes [b] == 3) // 00000011
                            || (bytes [b] == 7) // 00000111
                            || (bytes [b] == 15) // 00001111
                            || (bytes [b] == 31) // 00011111
                            || (bytes [b] == 63) // 00111111
                            || (bytes [b] == 127) // 01111111
                            || (bytes [b] == 255) // 11111111
                        )
                        {
                            foundFirstOne = true;
                            // So far so good. Continue to the next byte with
                            // a possibility of more consecutive 1s.
                        }
                        else if
                        (
                            (bytes [b] == 128) // 10000000
                            || (bytes [b] == 192) // 11000000
                            || (bytes [b] == 224) // 11100000
                            || (bytes [b] == 240) // 11110000
                            || (bytes [b] == 248) // 11111000
                            || (bytes [b] == 252) // 11111100
                            || (bytes [b] == 254) // 11111110
                        )
                        {
                            moreOnesPossible = false;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            return (false);
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        if(bytes [b] != 255) // 11111111
                        {
                            if
                            (
                                (bytes [b] == 128) // 10000000
                                || (bytes [b] == 192) // 11000000
                                    || (bytes [b] == 224) // 11100000
                                || (bytes [b] == 240) // 11110000
                                || (bytes [b] == 248) // 11111000
                                || (bytes [b] == 252) // 11111100
                                || (bytes [b] == 254) // 11111110
                            )
                            {
                                moreOnesPossible = false;
                            }
                        }                            
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    if (bytes [b] > 0)
                    {
                        return (false);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return (true);
}
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Here is the method I wrote myself. Not very elegant but pretty fast.

/// <summary>
/// Checks to see if this cell lies on a major diagonal of a power of 2.
/// ^[0]*[1]*[0]+$ denotes the regular expression of the binary pattern we are looking for.
/// </summary>
public bool IsDiagonalMajorToPowerOfTwo ()
{
    byte [] bytes = null;
    bool moreOnesPossible = true;
    System.Numerics.BigInteger number = 0;

    number = System.Numerics.BigInteger.Abs(this.X - this.Y);

    if ((number == 0) || (number == 1)) // 00000000
    {
        return (true); // All bits are zero.
    }
    else
    {
        // The last bit should always be 0.
        if (number.IsEven)
        {
            bytes = number.ToByteArray();

            for (byte b=0; b < bytes.Length; b++)
            {
                if (moreOnesPossible)
                {
                    switch (bytes [b])
                    {
                        case 001: // 00000001
                        case 003: // 00000011
                        case 007: // 00000111
                        case 015: // 00001111
                        case 031: // 00011111
                        case 063: // 00111111
                        case 127: // 01111111
                        case 255: // 11111111
                        {
                            // So far so good.
                            // Carry on testing subsequent bytes.

                            break;
                        }
                        case 128: // 10000000
                        case 064: // 01000000
                        case 032: // 00100000
                        case 016: // 00010000
                        case 008: // 00001000
                        case 004: // 00000100
                        case 002: // 00000010

                        case 192: // 11000000
                        case 096: // 01100000
                        case 048: // 00110000
                        case 024: // 00011000
                        case 012: // 00001100
                        case 006: // 00000110

                        case 224: // 11100000
                        case 112: // 01110000
                        case 056: // 00111000
                        case 028: // 00011100
                        case 014: // 00001110

                        case 240: // 11110000
                        case 120: // 01111000
                        case 060: // 00111100
                        case 030: // 00011110

                        case 248: // 11111000
                        case 124: // 01111100
                        case 062: // 00111110

                        case 252: // 11111100
                        case 126: // 01111110

                        case 254: // 11111110
                        {
                            moreOnesPossible = false;

                            break;
                        }
                        default:
                        {
                            return (false);
                        }
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    if (bytes [b] > 0)
                    {
                        return (false);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return (false);
        }
    }

    return (true);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work for all values. Try 00001111 10000000' and it returns false. I did a check for values between 0 and 10,000: 256 384 448 480 496 504 508 510 512 768 896 960 992 1008 1016 1020 1022 1024 1536 1792 1920 1984 2016 2032 2040 2044 2046 2048 3072 3584 3840 3968 4032 4064 4080 4088 4092 4094 4096 6144 7168 7680 7936 8064 8128 8160 8176 8184 8188 8190 8192' all return false in your code. Your code is 15% faster, I'll give you that, but it's also wrong. –  ShortFuse Aug 15 '12 at 22:47
    
Only 12% now with the new changes I put –  ShortFuse Aug 15 '12 at 22:57
    
Thanks for pointing that out. –  Raheel Khan Aug 16 '12 at 1:00
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I'm going to say that none of these answers are accounting for

00000010
00000110
00001110
00011110
00111110
01111110    
00000100
00001100
00011100
00111100
01111100    

etc, etc, etc.

Here's my byte array method:

public static bool ConformsToPattern(System.Numerics.BigInteger number)
{
    bool foundStart = false, foundEnd = false;
    int startPosition, stopPosition, increment;

    if (number.IsZero || number.IsPowerOfTwo)
        return true;
    if (!number.IsEven)            
        return false;
    byte[] bytes = number.ToByteArray();

    if(BitConverter.IsLittleEndian)
    {
        startPosition = 0;
        stopPosition = bytes.Length;
        increment = 1;
    }
    else
    {
        startPosition = bytes.Length - 1;
        stopPosition = -1;
        increment = -1;
    }

    for(int i = startPosition; i != stopPosition; i += increment)
    {
        byte n = bytes[i];      
        for(int shiftCount = 0; shiftCount < 8; shiftCount++)       
        {           
            if (!foundEnd)
            {
                if ((n & 1) == 1)
                    foundEnd = true;
                n = (byte)(n >> 1);
                continue;      
            }
            if (!foundStart)
            {
                if ((n & 1) == 0)   
                    foundStart = true;
                n = (byte)(n >> 1);
                continue;                
            }
            if (n == 0)
                continue;
            return false;
        }
    }
    if (foundEnd)
        return true;
    return false;
}

Here's my BigInteger method:

public static bool ConformsToPattern(System.Numerics.BigInteger number)
{
    bool foundStart = false;
    bool foundEnd = false;
    if (number.IsZero || number.IsPowerOfTwo)
        return true;
    if (!number.IsEven)            
        return false;
    while (!number.IsZero)
    {
        if (!foundEnd)
        {
            if (!number.IsEven)
                foundEnd = true;
            number = number >> 1;
            continue;                
        }
        if (!foundStart)
        {
            if (number.IsEven)                
                foundStart = true;
            number = number >> 1;
            continue;                
        }
        return false;
    }
    if (foundEnd)
        return true;
    return false;
}

Choose whichever works better for you. The byte array is faster as of now. The BigIntegers code is 100% accurate reference.

If you're not worried about native endianness remove that part code, but leaving it in there will ensure portability to other than just x86 systems. BigIntegers already gives me IsZero, IsEven and IsPowerOfTwo, so that's not an extra calculation. I'm not sure if that's the fastest way to bitshift right since there is a byte to int cast, but right now, I couldn't find another way. As for use of byte vs short vs int vs long for loop operations, that up to you to change if you feel it'll work better. I'm not sure what kind of BigIntegers you'll be sending so I think int would be safe. You can modify the code to remove the for loop and just copy paste the code 8 times, and it might be faster. Or you can throw that into a static method.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice catch. –  seekerOfKnowledge Aug 9 '12 at 14:09
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If I understand you correctly, you must have only 1 consecutive series of 1's followed by consecutive zeros.

So if it has to end in zero, it has to be even. All the bytes in the middle must be all 1's and the first and last byte are your only special cases.

         if (number.IsZero)
            return true;

         if (!number.IsEven)
            return false;


         var bytes = number.ToByteArray();

         for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
         {
            if (i == 0)  //first byte case
            {
               if (!(
                     (bytes[i] == 1) // 00000001 
                     || (bytes[i] == 3) // 00000011 
                     || (bytes[i] == 7) // 00000111 
                     || (bytes[i] == 15) // 00001111 
                     || (bytes[i] == 31) // 00011111 
                     || (bytes[i] == 63) // 00111111 
                     || (bytes[i] == 127) // 01111111 
                     || (bytes[i] == 255) // 11111111 
                    ))
               {
                  return false; 
               }
            }
            else if (i == bytes.Length) //last byte case
            {
               if (!(
                  (bytes[i] == 128) // 10000000 
                        || (bytes[i] == 192) // 11000000 
                        || (bytes[i] == 224) // 11100000 
                        || (bytes[i] == 240) // 11110000 
                        || (bytes[i] == 248) // 11111000 
                        || (bytes[i] == 252) // 11111100 
                        || (bytes[i] == 254) // 11111110 
                    ))
               {
                  return false;
               }
            }
            else //all bytes in the middle
            {
               if (bytes[i] != 255)
                  return false;
            }

         }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out even. One problem with this code is: Consider the sequence 0000-0001 1000-0000 0000-0000 0000-0000 whereas you are expecting all intermediate bytes to be 1111-1111. Am I missing something? –  Raheel Khan Aug 7 '12 at 14:05
    
good point. You could remove the trailing zeros perhaps. Pushing all the zeros off to the right. while (number.IsEven) number=number/2 –  hometoast Aug 7 '12 at 14:10
    
In that case, we might be better off without division since the numbers are huge (million+ bits) and this function gets called millions of times. –  Raheel Khan Aug 7 '12 at 14:54
    
Ok. With that information, this then wouldn't fare to well. –  hometoast Aug 7 '12 at 16:40
add comment

I'm a big fan of regular expressions, so I thought about simply converting the byte to a string and testing it against a regex. However, it's important to carefully define the pattern. By reading your question, I've come up with this one:

^(?:1*)(?:0+)$

Please, check it out:

    public static bool ConformsToPattern(System.Numerics.BigInteger number)
    {
        byte[] ByteArray = number.ToByteArray();

        Regex BinaryRegex = new Regex("^(?:1*)(?:0+)$", RegexOptions.Compiled);

        return ByteArray.Where<byte>(x => !BinaryRegex.IsMatch(Convert.ToString(x, 2))).Count() > 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately the overhead of string conversion and regex is too expensive in this case. This is for a low-level algorithm. –  Raheel Khan Aug 7 '12 at 14:53
    
@RaheelKhan Indeed, I've just run a microbenchmark and Hometoast's answer is way faster. Thanks for the feedback –  Andre Calil Aug 7 '12 at 17:15
add comment

Not sure if this will be faster or slower than what you already have, but it's something to try (hope I didn't botch the logic)...

public bool ConformsToPattern(System.Numerics.BigInteger number) {
    bool moreOnesPossible = true;
    if (number == 0) {
        return true;
    }
    else {
        byte[] bytes = number.ToByteArray();
        if ((bytes[bytes.Length - 1] & 1) == 1) {
            return false;
        }
        else {
            for (byte b = 0; b < bytes.Length; b++) {
                if (moreOnesPossible) {
                    switch (bytes[b]) {
                        case 1:
                        case 3:
                        case 7:
                        case 15:
                        case 31:
                        case 63:
                        case 127:
                        case 255:
                            continue;
                        default:
                            switch (bytes[b]) {
                                case 128:
                                case 192:
                                case 224:
                                case 240:
                                case 248:
                                case 252:
                                case 254:
                                    moreOnesPossible = false;
                                    continue;
                                default:
                                    return false;
                            }
                    }
                }
                else {
                    if (bytes[b] > 0) { return (false); }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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