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Iterate over Object Literal Values

i have object in JavaScript:

var object = someobject;

Object { aaa=true, bbb=true, ccc=true }

How can i use each for this?

 object.each(function(index, value)){
      console.log(value);
 }

not working.

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marked as duplicate by casperOne Aug 8 '12 at 13:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
    
Are you using jQuery? What result do you expect? Three 'true' in console? –  davids Aug 7 '12 at 12:56
    
jQuery's documentation of $.each (api.jquery.com/jQuery.each) has a perfect example -- see 2nd code block on the page. Uses alert() instead of console.log(). –  Faust Aug 7 '12 at 13:00
    
both code snippets you posted are not valid javascript. –  jbabey Aug 7 '12 at 13:00
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3 Answers 3

up vote 41 down vote accepted

A javascript Object does not have a standard .each function. jQuery provides a function. See http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.each/ The below should work

$.each(object, function(index, value) {
    console.log(value);
}); 

As also pointed out below, an easier option is to use

for(var index in object) { var attr = object[index]; }

But please note that you want to check whether the attribute that you are finding is from the object itself and not from up the prototype chain. This can be checked with

for(var index in object) { 
   if (object.hasOwnProperty(index)) {
       var attr = object[index];
   }
}

See https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/hasOwnProperty for more information. The jQuery.each function takes care of this automatically.

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2  
The "easier option" was not provided by you, just saying –  Alexander Aug 7 '12 at 13:00
    
True, I edited it in later on. Edited to make that clear. –  Willem Mulder Aug 7 '12 at 13:33
    
"easier" isnt always the "best", so.. –  Juan Apr 28 at 2:45
    
The for .. in statement is deprecated –  Daniel Schmidt May 4 at 18:38
1  
@DanielSchmidt It is not deprecated. devdocs.io/javascript/statements/for...in You are referring to the "for each (... in ...)" which is different from "for (... in ...)" –  Willem Mulder May 5 at 20:11
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for(var key in object) {
   console.log(object[key]);
}
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thanks, but this return me "true", instead of aaa,bbb,ccc :( –  Tom Mesgert Aug 7 '12 at 13:19
1  
yeah thats what its priting to console the value of attributes which is true for every key, if you want to see aaa, bbb, ccc then use console.log(key); –  SilentSakky Aug 7 '12 at 17:34
3  
Note that you might want to check whether the found key comes from the object itself, or from up the prototype chain. Use object.hasOwnProperty(key) to check that –  Willem Mulder Oct 3 '13 at 11:26
    
yes that's true, but adding property in object prototype is always a bad thing :) as that will affect all child object's like array, string etc –  SilentSakky Oct 3 '13 at 13:23
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var object = { "a": 1, "b": 2};
$.each(object, function(key, value){
    console.log(key + ": " + object[key]);
});

//output
a: 1
b: 2
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This is WRONG! $.each is JQuery-Framework! –  raiserle Apr 14 at 11:44
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