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I have a set of coordinates exported from google sketchup with extra fluff that I've been trying to strip with regex. I think it's really interesting for quickly getting drawings in 3D from e.g. SketchUp into canvas from and .xsi file. The are multiple instances of data sets in one variable:

$str = 'SI_NurbsCurve Edge1 {
        1,
        0,
        0,
        4,
        0,0,1,1,
        2,
        870.243,1229.35,143.395,1
        927.537,1323.53,103.842,1
        }

        SI_NurbsCurve Edge2 {
        1,
        0,
        0,
        4,
        0,0,1,1,
        2,
        899.54,1217.88,116.255,1
        870.243,1229.35,143.395,1
        }';

I've attempted to remove everything from the multiple instances except the coordinate data with this regex:

$reg = '#SI_NurbsCurve Edge[^"]* {
        1,
        0,
        0,
        4,
        0,0,1,1,
        2,#';  
$rep=""; 
$str=preg_replace($reg,$rep,$str);

However, this result in only echoing the last coordinate set found in the string, in this example the following remains:

899.54,1217.88,116.255,1
870.243,1229.35,143.395,1

Besides that I'm trying to strip the last number "1" that occurs on each line of coordinates, so this entire example would end up looking like this:

870.243,1229.35,143.395,
927.537,1323.53,103.842,

899.54,1217.88,116.255,
870.243,1229.35,143.395,

I would be very grateful for your time and know-how!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your first problem (getting only the last values) is probably caused by this:

#SI_NurbsCurve Edge[^"]*

You would need a non-greedy regex or if the value after Edge are just numbers:

#SI_NurbsCurve Edge[0-9]*

After that, you can chop of the last two characters of every remaining line.

You probably need to escape the { character as well: \{ and account for the } and spaces / new-lines after every set so the first line should be something like:

$str = '#(\}\s+)?SI_NurbsCurve Edge[0-9]* \{

See the working example (except for the last 2 chars of every line...) on Codepad.

To also get rid of the remaining ,1 at the end of each line, you can change the preg_replace line with:

$str=preg_replace(array($reg, '#,1\r#'),array($rep,"\r"),$str);

This works on Codepad at least but probably depends on the encoding of the newlines.

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Wow, thank you so much for a great reply! So would I have to strip the 1 and the space after the regex output or would that affect performance, when talking about running this for sets of thousands? –  Oliver Aug 7 '12 at 13:31
    
@Oliver You could use another regex that replaces ,1\n with just \n (depending on the type of line-breaks in your string). preg_replace accepts an array for the pattern, so you could probably do both in one go. –  jeroen Aug 7 '12 at 13:41
    
Of course that makes sense, this has been very helpful for my beginnings in PHP. Thank you so much for your help @jeroen! –  Oliver Aug 7 '12 at 13:45
    
@Oliver I have added the modification to the replacement line. –  jeroen Aug 7 '12 at 13:49
    
This works wonders, also with the encoding I have here, I will just put everything onto one line separated by commas, and work the rest in javascript and output it to canvas. Thank you! –  Oliver Aug 7 '12 at 14:06

I think you're looking for $str = substr($str,0,-1)

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Indeed, that could be a solution for stripping the line ends, thanks! –  Oliver Aug 7 '12 at 13:37

It's not a perfect solution, by any means, but, with the available test data, the following will return the desired output:

$str = 'SI_NurbsCurve Edge1 {
        1,
        0,
        0,
        4,
        0,0,1,1,
        2,
        870.243,1229.35,143.395,1
        927.537,1323.53,103.842,1
        }

        SI_NurbsCurve Edge2 {
        1,
        0,
        0,
        4,
        0,0,1,1,
        2,
        899.54,1217.88,116.255,1
        870.243,1229.35,143.395,1
        }';

function stripExtra( $inElem ){
  return !preg_match( '/^(?:(?:[0124](?:,0,1,1)?\,)|(?:\})|(?:SI_NurbsCurve Edge.+ \{))$/' , $inElem );
}

$arr2 = array_filter( array_map( 'trim' , explode( "\n" , preg_replace( "/\,1\s+\n/" , ",\n" , $str ) ) ) , 'stripExtra' );

var_dump( $arr2 );

# Returns
# array(5) {
#   [7]=>
#   string(25) "870.243,1229.35,143.395,"
#   [8]=>
#   string(25) "927.537,1323.53,103.842,"
#   [10]=>
#   string(0) ""
#   [18]=>
#   string(24) "899.54,1217.88,116.255,"
#   [19]=>
#   string(25) "870.243,1229.35,143.395,"
# }

Walking through the solution...

function stripExtra( $inElem ){
  return !preg_match( '/^(?:(?:[0124](?:,0,1,1)?\,)|(?:\})|(?:SI_NurbsCurve Edge.+ \{))$/' , $inElem );
}

This function will match a presented string. Dependent on whether the provided string matches a specific pattern, it will return true or false. This will allow us to remove unwanted lines at a later stage. The pattern used here will match the following lines:

SI_NurbsCurve Edge1 {
0,
1,
2,
4,
0,0,1,1,
}

Note: It will only match these lines when they are not prefixed with one or more spaces. But, as your final output has all that space stripped out, it's no biggie.

So, for readability, I will transpose my one-line-wonder here across multiple lines so I can explain it better.

$arr2 = preg_replace( "/1\s+\n/" , "\n" , $str );

This replaces any instances of ",1" at the end of a line with just the comma, as requested.

$arr2 = explode( "\n" , $arr2 );

This splits the string based on newline characters, creating an array with each line forming a new element.

$arr2 = array_map( 'trim' , $arr2 );

This uses the array_map() function (PHP Documentation) to apply the trim() function (PHP Documentation) to each of them, removing any leading and/or trailing spaces from each element.

$arr2 = array_filter( $arr2 , 'stripExtra' );

Remember that function we wrote above? Now we move through the array, and test each of the elements. If they do not match the above noted lines, then they are kept in the array. If they match the above, unwanted lines, that element is removed from the array.

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Thank you for your thorough explanation on trim() stages, appreciate it! –  Oliver Aug 7 '12 at 14:18

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