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The queries I would like to perform:

BEGIN TRANSACTION

   INSERT INTO TABLE_B SELECT * FROM TABLE_A WHERE SOME_COLUMN = 'something'

   DELETE FROM TABLE_A WHERE COLUMN IN (
     SELECT * FROM TABLE_A WHERE SOME_COLUMN = 'something'
   )


END TRANSACTION

As you can see, there is a redundant SELECT statement in the DELETE query that I would like to replace (if possible), thus improving efficiency.

I was thinking to create a View with the rows in the first query and then scan the View with the rows in the second table. If some condition matches, then delete the row from the second table.

Could I get some pointers on how this could be done? If there is anything wrong I am doing, please critisize.

I am using Sybase.

Thanks.

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3  
Which RDBMS are you using? –  Michael Berkowski Aug 7 '12 at 13:49
    
DELETE FROM TABLE_A WHERE SOME_COLUMN = 'something' perhaps? –  ypercube Aug 7 '12 at 13:51
    
You can delete from views in quite a few RDBMSes :D –  Charleh Aug 7 '12 at 13:51
    
Your WHERE COLUMN IN (SELECT * ...) will not work anyway, unless table_A has only one column. –  ypercube Aug 7 '12 at 13:52
    
What does the "view" in the title have to do with anything? –  Gordon Linoff Aug 7 '12 at 13:54

2 Answers 2

This is what you want, I think:

delete from table_a
where some_column = 'something'

As written, your query would probably generate a syntax error. The "SELECT *" would return all columns in table_a, and it presumably has more than one column.

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And IN Clause is little bit slower.So always avoid to use it. –  Ram Singh Aug 7 '12 at 14:06
    
@raman, Could you please explain or link the explanation as to why IN is slow? –  czchlong Aug 7 '12 at 14:37

Generally, you should be able to do joins in the delete statement, but you'd need to specify the table from which you're deleting rows:

delete table_a 
  from table_a left join table_b on (table_a.column_a = table_b.column_b)
 where table_b.column_b = 'some_value'
share|improve this answer
    
Why do you start with delete table_a? Also, could I create a View on the result set from the first query and perform a join between the View and my second table? Would that improve efficiency? –  czchlong Aug 7 '12 at 14:15
    
That's how you specify which table to delete rows from. It's part of the Transact-SQL extension to ANSI SQL, supported by Sybase (goo.gl/HFdjf). –  Gingi Aug 7 '12 at 14:21

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