Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my textbook it says:

All threads within a process have access to the same data (share)

But each thread has its own stack, it means local variable is not shared. So what kind of data threads can share.

update:

I found each thread can share global variable, it made me confused, what I learn global global variable is static stack, it shouldn't be shared by that each thread has its own stack.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Firstly, global and static variables are shared.

Secondly, memory from malloc that you can reach via a pointer in a global variable, (or via a pointer that...) is shared.

Thirdly, memory in one thread's stack that you can reach via a pointer in a global variable, (or via a pointer that...) is shared.

Really, all of it is shared, all the time, but not all of it is reachable. Thread A can access thread B's stack, but it won't have a pointer to do so through unless thread B does something like assign the address of something in its stack to a global (don't do that) or you're doing something where you examine the details of the threads and work your way into their stacks (if you're doing that you're way more knowledgeable enough about the mechanisms of the pthreads implementation than I am*, so I won't tell you not to do that, but as a rule it wouldn't be something to do lightly).

Mostly you only have to worry about global and static, and can consider anything dealing only in locals to be thread-safe, but that gets blown away once you can reach the latter from the former.

*Actually, I know little on that, and am mostly basing this on knowledge of threading in other languages. Really, it's a general threading thing rather than a pthreads specific one, with the exception that some other languages won't even let you fall into the trap of referencing stack memory from global.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your comprehensive answer, I learned a lot –  mko Aug 7 '12 at 14:36

I found each thread can share global variable, it made me confused, what I learn global global variable is static stack, it shouldn't be shared by that each thread has its own stack.

You're thinking too much about the stack, there are other memory regions such as data or bss. Objects with static storage (such as global variables and those declared with the modifier static) are shared between all threads.

Also, if you try hard, all threads can acces everything, there's nothing special about a different "stack". If a thread manages to get a pointer to a location on another "stack" it can freely read it, modify it etc.

The main point of all this is that threads don't just share variables. They are simply in the same virtual memory space.

share|improve this answer
    
It clear out. so global variable is static storage, not stack at all isn't it –  mko Aug 7 '12 at 14:02

@cnicutar is right about the static storage. Actually there is a good discussion about this in another question. Despite the title of that question, the answers there(especially first two) do answer your question well and I don't think I can do better.

share|improve this answer
    
I realized that this should be in the comment area –  Gnijuohz Aug 7 '12 at 14:13
    
thanks for providing the related question –  mko Aug 7 '12 at 14:35

As has been said, each thread has its own stack. So data on this stack is said to be thread safe, since only it owns it.

All threads within a process have access to the same data (share)

As it implies, multiple threads have access to same data. This should ring some mini alarm bells since you have to start thinking about thread synchronization (critical sections, mutexes etc) to resources which are shared.

Resources allocated on the heap say through the new operator are shared as all threads have access to the same heap.

share|improve this answer

I dont think static data will be allocated for each thread. It will be instantiated only once and will be accessible to all the threads having the declaration of that static data in their execute() method..

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.