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I have a problem with understanding why actually "unit size" block needed.

I can type:

1> << Y:4/integer-unit:8 >> = << 1,2,3,4 >>.
<<1,2,3,4>>
2> Y.                                       
16909060

But I can get the same result without specifying unit size:

3> << X:32/integer >> = << 1,2,3,4 >>.      
<<1,2,3,4>>
4> X.
16909060

So, please, suggest me situations, when I can get real benefits of using "unit size" block.

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

I don't understand.

You can certainly read the first byte of a binary to get the length of the next value:

1> X = <<16, 256:16>>.
<<16,1,0>>

2> <<Length, Value:Length>> = X.
<<16,1,0>>

3> Length.
16

4> Value.
256

And (2*8) is a legal Size:

5> f(). 
ok

6> X = <<2, 256:16>>.
<<2,1,0>>

7> <<Length, Value:(2*8)>> = X.
<<2,1,0>>

8> Length.
2

9> Value.
256

So why does a Size of Length*8 fail when Length=2?

10> f(Length).
ok

11> f(Value).
ok

12> <<Length, Value:(Length*8)>> = X.
* 1: illegal bit size
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...................... –  7stud Nov 30 '12 at 5:11
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I've found case, when "unit size" block is necessary:

if you need to read from the bitstream size of following block, and match it

This example should illustrate problem:

1> << Length, Value:(Length*8)/integer >> = << 2, 256:16 >>.   
* 2: illegal bit size

But you can do this simply, using "unit size" block:

2> << Length, Value:Length/integer-unit:8 >> = << 2, 256:16 >>.
<<2,1,0>>
3> Value.
256
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The unit-size is rarely used by programmers. It is used somewhat internally because /binary has a unit-size of 8 bits by default. This is usually what you want to pick out for binary parts. Often the case is that for integers, you want to specify the size in bits but binaries you want to specify in 8bit bytes.

However, there may be cases you want to capture the fact differently and thus the unit type specifier exists to fix the problem.

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