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struct T
{
    int a;
};

struct C
{
    T& r;
    C(T& v) : r(v) {}
};

struct E : T
{
    T& r;
    E(T const& v) : r(*this), T(v) {}   // ok
};

struct F : C, T // base order doesn't matter here
{
    //F(T const& v) : C(*this), T(v) {}   // error : C::r is not initialized properly
    F(T const& v) : C(*static_cast<T*>(this)), T(v) {}   // ok
    //F(T const& v) : C(static_cast<T&>(*this)), T(v) {}   // ok
};

int main()
{
    T v;
    F f(v);
    f.r.a = 1;
}

Although using this pointer in initializer list could be problem, but I've never expected this happened to PODs and may be simply fixed by explicit cast; Is this some compiler bug or std related problem?

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Can you change the inheritance order to T, C? –  Kerrek SB Aug 7 '12 at 14:29
    
Compiles fine for me using Visual Studio 2012, but causes an access violation on the assignment to 1. Is that what you get? –  noelicus Aug 7 '12 at 14:38
    
gcc-4.5.1 fails with error: call of overloaded 'C(F&)' is ambiguous: ideone.com/Yjh8k –  ecatmur Aug 7 '12 at 14:48
    
The order of execution of the initializer list is determined by the class definition (and not the initializer list itself) I'd recommend that you write the initializer list in the same order that it will be executed, to avoid surprises: E(T const&v) : T(v), r(*this){}. In this particular case it does not make a difference, but it is clearer for a maintainer that r won't be correctly initialized during the call to the base constructor. In the second case, while for your particular case it does not matter, the order of declaration of bases matters in that it changes the order of construction –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 7 '12 at 15:23
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The code is ambiguous.

For constructing the C base of F, the context is direct-initialization, so 13.3.1.3 applies:

13.3.1.3 Initialization by constructor [over.match.ctor]

For direct-initialization, the candidate functions are all the constructors of the class of the object being initialized.

The implicitly-declared copy constructor is included, per 12.8:8.

The candidates for the constructor of C are C(T &) and (the default copy constructor) C(const C &), by parameter list (F). In both cases we have a reference binding (13.3.3.1.4) followed by a derived-to-base Conversion (13.3.3.1), with an additional cv-qualification adjustment in the latter case, giving overall rank of Conversion in both cases.

Since C and T are both base classes of F, but are distinct types and neither is a base class of the other, none of the clauses in 13.3.3.2:3 nor 13.3.3.2:4 apply and conversion sequences are indistinguishable.

Indeed, gcc-4.5.1 rejects the code with:

prog.cpp: In constructor 'F::F(const T&)':
prog.cpp:20:34: error: call of overloaded 'C(F&)' is ambiguous
prog.cpp:9:5: note: candidates are: C::C(T&)
prog.cpp:7:1: note:                 C::C(const C&)
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Excellent explanation! So, this should have raisen an ambiguous error. Shame on you, M$. –  feverzsj Aug 7 '12 at 15:18
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When you try to initialize the base C of F with *this, both the compiler generated copy constructor for C and the constructor that you define taking a T& are a match as the type of *this (F) is derived directly from both C and T. Your cast resolves this ambiguity.

I am surprised that the copy constructor is a better match than the one taking T& as I would have thought that they would both be equally preferred. If the copy-constructor is chosen then the base will be initialized from itself which causes undefined behavior as the reference member will be initialized from an uninitialized reference (itself).

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Exactly! After explicitly adding the copy ctor, the hidden behaviour is catched. This definitely should raise a ambiguous error. –  feverzsj Aug 7 '12 at 14:45
    
@feverzsj: I'm sure an expert will be along soon who can tell us why the copy constructor is preferred rather than just being an equally viable candidate. –  Charles Bailey Aug 7 '12 at 14:48
    
@CharlesBailey the constructors are ambiguous; see my answer. –  ecatmur Aug 7 '12 at 15:13
    
@ecatmur: Well that was what I was expecting but according to the question the compiler was selecting the copy constructor in preference. Any idea why? –  Charles Bailey Aug 7 '12 at 15:49
    
Per feverzsj's comment, it seems that the compiler was preferring the copy constructor only as long as it was implicitly-declared. Still no real idea why. –  ecatmur Aug 7 '12 at 16:14
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1)never use this in initialization list http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/3c594ae3(v=vs.80).aspx The this pointer is valid only within nonstatic member functions. It cannot be used in the initializer list for a base class.

The base-class constructors and class member constructors are called before this constructor. In effect, you've passed a pointer to an unconstructed object to another constructor. If those other constructors access any members or call member functions on this, the result will be undefined. You should not use the this pointer until all construction has completed.

shortly: C.r initialized by bad poiter

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I think you need to look at the "Alternative description explaining when this is harmless and when this is not harmless". –  Charles Bailey Aug 7 '12 at 15:51
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struct C
{
    T& r;
    C(T& v) : r(v) {}
};

struct E : T
{
    T& r;
    E(T const& v) : r(*this), T(v) {}   // ok
};

You need to initialize any reference at the time of declaration but here you have just declared it. This is not allowed in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
References that are class members are an exception. They can (and have to be) declared without an initializer. –  Charles Bailey Aug 7 '12 at 14:35
    
Yep - and you'll notice the other references compile just fine, in this example! –  noelicus Aug 7 '12 at 14:36
    
@CharlesBailey thanks for edifying me.. :) –  Yogesh Aug 7 '12 at 14:39
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