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I found this flexible, one-image rating widget built with SASS by AirBnB. I'd like to create something similar with LESS. I know I could just write out the CSS, but I'd like to do it dynamically with LESS. My main problem seems to be dynamically adding the counter _1 ... _10 to the class (.filled_1 ... filled_10). Is this possible in LESS?

Here's the working SASS code:

$starWidth: 44px;
$starOffset: 0 -43px;
$numStars: 5;
$steps: 2;
$total: $numStars * $steps;

@mixin filled($n: 0) {
  width: ($starWidth / $steps) * $n;
}

.stars {
  background: url(/images/sprite.png) repeat-x top left;
  height: 43px;

  &.empty {
    background-position: $starOffset;
    width: $numStars * $starWidth;
  }

  @for $i from 0 through ($total) {
    &.filled_#{$i} { @include filled($i) }
  }
}

This turns out code like this in CSS:

.stars {
  background: url(/images/sprite.png) repeat-x top left;
  height: 43px; }
  .stars.empty {
    background-position: 0 -43px;
    width: 220px; }
  .stars.filled_0 {
    width: 0px; }
  .stars.filled_1 {
    width: 22px; }
  .stars.filled_2 {
    width: 44px; }
  .stars.filled_3 {
    width: 66px; }
  .stars.filled_4 {
    width: 88px; }
  .stars.filled_5 {
    width: 110px; }
  .stars.filled_5 {
    width: 132px; }
  .stars.filled_7 {
    width: 154px; }
  .stars.filled_8 {
    width: 176px; }
  .stars.filled_9 {
    width: 198px; }
  .stars.filled_10 {
    width: 220px; }

How can I do the same loop and include in LESS instead of CSS?

The final HTML will look like this: (where 9 will show 4.5 stars)

<div class="stars empty">
  <div class="stars filled_9">4.5</div>
</div>
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

As simple as link to a resource: http://blog.thehippo.de/2012/04/programming/do-a-loop-with-less-css

And here is code sample from the resource:

LESS code:

@iterations: 30;

// helper class, will never show up in resulting css
// will be called as long the index is above 0
.loopingClass (@index) when (@index > 0) {

    // create the actual css selector, example will result in
    // .myclass_30, .myclass_28, .... , .myclass_1
    (~".myclass_@{index}") {
        // your resulting css
        my-property: -@index px;
    }

    // next iteration
    .loopingClass(@index - 1);
}

// end the loop when index is 0
.loopingClass (0) {}

// "call" the loopingClass the first time with highest value
.loopingClass (@iterations);

Resulting CSS:

.myclass_30 {
  my-property: -30 px;
}
.myclass_29 {
  my-property: -29 px;
}

.......
.......
.......

.myclass_1 {
  my-property: .1 px;
}
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Stackoverflow user GnrlBzik shared a looping strategy for LESS, but the result looked more complex than I had hoped. Here is a working solution that still looks elegant for those that will have a static amount of stars.

@starWidth: 44px;
@starOffset: 0 -43px;
@numStars: 5;

.starCount(@starSpan: 1) {
    width: (@starWidth / 2) * @starSpan;
}

.stars {

    background: url('/images/sprites/stars.png') repeat-x top left;
    height: 43px;
    display:block;

    &.empty {
        background-position: @starOffset;
        width: (@starWidth * @numStars);
    }

    &.filled_0     { .starCount(0); }
    &.filled_1     { .starCount(1); }
    &.filled_2     { .starCount(2); }
    &.filled_3     { .starCount(3); }
    &.filled_4     { .starCount(4); }
    &.filled_5     { .starCount(5); }
    &.filled_6     { .starCount(6); }
    &.filled_7     { .starCount(7); }
    &.filled_8     { .starCount(8); }
    &.filled_9     { .starCount(9); }
    &.filled_10    { .starCount(10); }
}
share|improve this answer
    
here is a link to resource: blog.thehippo.de/2012/04/programming/do-a-loop-with-less-css –  GnrlBzik Aug 7 '12 at 17:57
    
Thanks. It looks like the loop can be look more complex than just pasting in a list. Perhaps this is a case where efficient code isn't as pretty as copy-paste. I suppose if my loop needed to be flexible I'd have to go further here, but as it is, I'm comfortable with the result. Thanks again. –  Ryan Aug 9 '12 at 14:31
    
np and makes sense, as in cases when you have 10 or even 30 items, just good to know how : ) –  GnrlBzik Sep 26 '12 at 16:53

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