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I am bothered by a question of for loop in C language.

when i write:

#include<conio.h>
#include<stdio.h>
main()
{
    int i = 0;
    for( ; i ; )
    {
        printf("In for Loop");
    }
    getch();
}

Output: NOTHING PRINT.

Code get executed, but printf statement didn't print due to condition. OK, No problem here.

But when i write this code:

#include<conio.h>
#include<stdio.h>
main()
{
    for( ; 0 ; )
    {
        printf("In for Loop");
    }
    getch();
}

Output: In for Loop.

My for loop get executed 1 time, but actually it must not to be executed. I don't know why? can coder/programmer/hacker of stackoverflow help me. explain me please why my for loop giving this output only one time.

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closed as too localized by Henrik, ecatmur, Daniel Fischer, Mark B, akappa Aug 7 '12 at 15:33

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I cannot reproduce this behavior. Compile without flag with g++. –  nhahtdh Aug 7 '12 at 14:47
    
nothing is printed in the second loop for me. Used Apple LLVM 3.1 –  Andrew Aug 7 '12 at 14:47
    
How are you compiling your program? Also: Would be nice if you pasted the entire second version of the program, exactly as it is, instead of just the loop. –  ArjunShankar Aug 7 '12 at 14:50
    
can't reproduce the problem on gcc and clang on linux. –  Aftnix Aug 7 '12 at 14:52
2  
Possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/11086759/… –  tinman Aug 7 '12 at 15:18

3 Answers 3

What you wrote shouldn't print anything, but I suspect the actual second-case code (not what you typed in) that causes the problem is:

for( ; 0 ; );     // <==== note the trailing semicolon there.
{
    printf("In for Loop");
}

In this case the for loop doesn't execute the empty statement, and then the { } code is executed once.

EDIT: If this isn't the problem please just paste a complete program that exhibits the problem directly into your question.

EDIT2:

The following minimal compilable example doesn't print anything:

#include <cstdio>

int main()
{
    for( ; 0 ; )
    {
        std::printf("In for Loop");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Every programmer runs in this problem at least once in its lifetime –  akappa Aug 7 '12 at 14:50
    
Yeah. I'd bet money on this one, not just because it would have the behaviour described, but also as @akappa says, everyone's done it at least once. (And if you find cases where empty for loops are useful, you'll do the opposite at least once too). –  Jon Hanna Aug 7 '12 at 14:52
1  
When I need an empty for loop I still use braces and a big fat comment saying that it's a null loop body. –  Mark B Aug 7 '12 at 14:55
8  
@MohdIftekharQurashi You don't make any silly mistakes in coding? You'd be the only one in the whole world. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 7 '12 at 14:56
2  
Link to runnable code example –  JoeFish Aug 7 '12 at 15:04

Both ways should output nothing.

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I can't replicate this behavior on my machine, compiling with gcc. The two programs were:

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
  for( ; 0 ; )
  {
    std::cout << "Here I am!";
  }
  std::cout << "End of the program.";
}

outputs

End of Program

as does

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
  int i = 0;
  for( ; i ; )
  {
    std::cout << "Here I am!";
  }
  std::cout << "End of Program";
}

This is what we would expect to happen, as the 0 read as the loop continuation condition is evaluated to false, so the loop is never entered.

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But really believe me. my turbo c++ 3.0 gives me my output. your gcc may give correct answer as expected. –  Mohd Iftekhar Qurashi Aug 7 '12 at 15:24
1  
@MohdIftekharQurashi Damn, that's a really old compiler. Does it run on coal? –  Etienne de Martel Aug 7 '12 at 15:26
    
@MohdIftekharQurashi It's a bug in TurboC++-3.0. See here You should choose a better compiler. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 7 '12 at 15:26

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