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I need to search a Text Box after user input to see if there are any Occurrences of a particular abbreviation.

As an example, I want to see if the user has input one of the following:-

".AB ", "AB." , " AB ", "/AB", ",AB"

What is the cleanest way of doing this please?

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Is this ASP.NET or WinForms or something else? Please explain your scenario a bit further. –  eburgos Aug 7 '12 at 15:05
    
Your searching for an exact match or any match inside a string? –  Magnus Aug 7 '12 at 15:06
    
Its a win app, I'm just looking at detecting the above abbreviation in the text box in those formats, its part of my error handling. –  Derek Aug 7 '12 at 15:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

An easy way is to use Regular Expressions:

if (Regex.IsMatch(yourTextBox.Text, @"((\.|,|\s)AB(\.|,|\s)"))) {
    // do something
}

Choose a regex that matches the strings you want to detect.

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Maybe you should use the Contains() method of String. Example:

string[] abbreviationsList = { ".AB ", "AB.", " AB ", "/AB", ",AB" };
        foreach (string abbreviations in abbreviationsList)
        {
            if (myTextBox.Text.Contains(abbreviations))
            {
                // Your code here
            }
        }

There are other ways to do that, of course, but my point is using Contains() in the Text of your TextBox.

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How will that work with a list of strings? –  Oded Aug 7 '12 at 15:06
    
@Oded I edited my answer to include an example of how it would work with a list of strings. –  Rodrigo Guedes Aug 7 '12 at 15:16
    
So why use Contains? Why not Equals? –  Oded Aug 7 '12 at 15:17
    
Because Contains search for a fragment of the string, while Equals looks for exact match. For instance: If you have a string "Stack" and use Contains("a") it would find it, but Equals would say that they are different strings. –  Rodrigo Guedes Aug 7 '12 at 15:20
1  
He is looking for occurrences of a particular abbreviations, not for a exact match. It's like check if there is any occurrence of "Ave." in an address. It's supposed to be followed by the name of the Avenue, not only the abbreviation. So I believe Contains would be most appropriate, if I understood well what is he looking for. –  Rodrigo Guedes Aug 7 '12 at 15:27

Using the LINQ Contains extension method:

var abbreviations = new [] { ".AB ", "AB." , " AB ", "/AB", ",AB" };

return abbreviations.Contains(myTextBox.Text);

If you want the search to be case insensitive:

return abbreviations.Contains(myTextBox.Text.ToUpper());
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Thanks For This! –  Derek Aug 7 '12 at 15:04

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