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The following code is part of a slide in my C++ Class. IntelliSence is giving me errors and I don't know why. Not sure why it doesnt like the Constructor and Destructor. Can Someone please Help?

class Vehicle {
     friend void guest();
 private:
     string make;
     string model;
     int year;
 public:
     void Vehicle();
     void Vehicle(string, string, int);
     void ~Vehicle();
     string getMake();
 }

 void guest() {
     cout << make;
 }

 1) IntelliSense: member function with the same name as its class must be a constructor
 2) IntelliSense: member function with the same name as its class must be a constructor
 3) IntelliSense: return type may not be specified on a destructor
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3  
Constructors and destructors have NO return types. Remove "void". –  Frédéric Terrazzoni Aug 7 '12 at 15:05
2  
Those voids in the constructors and the destructor are really in your class' slide? –  mfontanini Aug 7 '12 at 15:05
1  
Yes, I feel the class really sucks since I was given one slide to explain "friend" and there example doesnt work –  StephanM Aug 7 '12 at 15:10
1  
@StephanM: Just noticed that. The way they try to use friend just shows they have no idea of basic C++. That's a much worse mistake than void on the ctor and dtor, which could have just been an oversight. Drop the class if you can or complain, though that's unlikely to do much good. –  john Aug 7 '12 at 15:15
3  
I really hate to say, I have been in the process of complaining to the Dean of Students. –  StephanM Aug 7 '12 at 15:24
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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

constructors and destructors don't have return types! Should be:

Vehicle();
Vehicle(string, string, int);
~Vehicle();

You need to pass an argument to your function:

void guest(const Vehicle &v)
{
    cout << v.make; //friend allows you to access 'make' directly
}

Of course you must change the friend declaration accordingly

And don't forget ; at the end of your class

EDIT

Full code that works:

class Vehicle {
    friend void guest(const Vehicle &v);
private:
    string make;
    string model;
    int year;
public:
    Vehicle() {}
    Vehicle(string make, string model, int year) : make(make), model(model), year(year) {}
    ~Vehicle() {}
    string getMake() const {return make;}
};

void guest(const Vehicle &v) {
    cout << v.make;
}



int main()
{
    guest(Vehicle("foo", "bar", 10));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
OK, that made that go away, but now I see the following on my void guess. "1) IntelliSense: a nonstatic member reference must be relative to a specific object" using the friend above should have made "make" visable to guest(). –  StephanM Aug 7 '12 at 15:16
    
@StephanM: see my edit –  Andrew Aug 7 '12 at 15:21
    
2)IntelliSense: member "Vehicle::make" (declared at line 16) is inaccessible 1)IntelliSense: no operator "<<" matches these operands –  StephanM Aug 7 '12 at 15:31
    
@StephanM: I've poster the full code –  Andrew Aug 7 '12 at 15:38
    
Thanks for posting the full code, but still getting an error on the << which doesn't make any sence, since it is coded how it should be. am i maybe missing some configuration switches? –  StephanM Aug 7 '12 at 16:31
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The error messages are actually pretty good in this case if you understand them.

void Vehicle();

because the "method" has the same name as the class, your Intellisense thinks it should be a construtor. It's right! Constructors don't have return types, so make it:

Vehicle();

Similarly:

void Vehicle(string, string, int);

also appears to be a constructor because the name of the "method" is the same as the class. Just because it has parameters doesn't make it special. It should be:

Vehicle(string, string, int);

Deconstructors don't have return types either, so

void ~Vehicle();

should be:

~Vehicle();
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Constructors and Destructors don't have return types. Just remove those and your code should compile. Having the return type

 void Vehicle(); 

tells the compiler you want to declare a function with name Vehicle() but as this is the same name as the class it is not allowed unless it is a constructor (which has no return type). The error messages were telling you exactly what your problem was in this case.

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I figured based on the instruction given to me that since nothing was returned "void" was ok. the problem i now see is that the guest function cant see "make" –  StephanM Aug 7 '12 at 15:22
    
@StephanM you cant access the member that way because you have no instance of the class. It is not a static member so you will need to provide an instance (or pointer or reference to one) to your friend function. –  mathematician1975 Aug 7 '12 at 15:28
    
@StephanM See Andrews answer –  mathematician1975 Aug 7 '12 at 15:32
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