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have an OSGi application running Equinox. I'd like to see the services that are provided by the application. How can I do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It depends whether you mean interactively, using an OSGi shell, or programmatically from your application.

Interactively

You can use the Equinox console. See 'services'. To only see the services you have deployed you need to use an LDAP filter. Here's an example:

(objectClass=my.package.name.*)

Also see @Neil Bartlett's answer which might be easier as you can just constrain by bundle id (assuming you know it, but that's easy to find).

Programatically

Use the ServiceTracker approach. Neil also wrote all about this, so make sure to give him your upvotes too :)

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it seems to show the eclipse osgi services running. I'd like to see the services from my osgi application that I have deployed. Is there a way to do this? –  user840930 Aug 7 '12 at 15:33
    
Again, you need to use a filter to whittle them down. Also, in some consoles (I'm not sure about the Equinox console) you can filter by source bundle... Neil's second code sample is an example of this. –  Dan Gravell Oct 17 '12 at 8:51

From the gogo shell type:

inspect cap service

That will show all services registered by all bundles. If you want to show services for a specific bundle then type:

inspect cap service <id>

Where <id> is the numeric bundle ID of the bundle you are interested in.

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By far, and I mean by far, the best way to see your services and thousands details more is using Apache Felix Webconsole and then installing XRay. You might want to read my first and second blog about this bundle.

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