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I have the following output

<computers><size>5</size><computer><id>1</id><name>NSK1210050726M</name></computer><computer><id>2</id><name>nsk1200015739m</name></computer><computer><id>3</id><name>SFO1502083053M</name></computer><computer><id>5</id><name>nsk1501817326m</name></computer><computer><id>8</id><name>nsk1501901173m</name></computer></computers>

and I want to get only the names inside of tags using shell scripting.

How can I accomplish this?

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1  
what did you try? –  Cfreak Aug 7 '12 at 15:28
    
I tried using sed but it ouputs the entire list including tags –  user1582375 Aug 7 '12 at 15:29
1  
You should post the code you tried –  Cfreak Aug 7 '12 at 15:30
    
sed -n '/<name>/p' CurlOutPut.txt | sed 's/.*(<name>)(.*)(\/<name>).*/\1/' –  user1582375 Aug 7 '12 at 15:31
    
any ideas how I can complete this using scripting? –  user1582375 Aug 7 '12 at 15:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your xml is in a shell variable, say $XML then you can use shell parameter substitution and a simple loop to do a really bad job of parsing it.

XML='<computers><size>5</size><computer><id>1</id><name>NSK1210050726M</name></computer><computer><id>2</id><name>nsk1200015739m</name></computer><computer><id>3</id><name>SFO1502083053M</name></computer><computer><id>5</id><name>nsk1501817326m</name></computer><computer><id>8</id><name>nsk1501901173m</name></computer></computers>'
match=0
for word in ${XML//[<>]/ }; do
    if [ $match -eq 1 ]; then
        echo $word
        match=0
    elif [ $word = "name" ]; then
        match=1
    fi
done

But really, REALLY, using something like xml starlet suggested by @Brian Agnew is a much better idea.

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Could you explain this a bit if you dont mind? –  user1582375 Aug 7 '12 at 16:58
    
The "magic" is the parameter expansion - ${XML//[<>]/ } - it's essentially a poor man's sed, replacing <> with spaces in this case. Then it just iterates with a for loop over what's left, which will be tags, close tags, and cdata. Any slight change to the xml will break this. –  evil otto Aug 7 '12 at 17:19

You should check out the XMLStarlet command-line toolkit for parsing and modifying XML.

For the above you can specify an XPath to pull out the text, respecting character encoding, entities etc.

$ xmlstarlet sel -t -v "//name" x.xml    

will give you the list of computer names (assuming your XML is in x.xml). You can format them more nicely thus:

$ xmlstarlet sel -t -m  "//name" -v "translate(.,'&#10;','')" -n x.xml
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strictly, I'd like to use a BASH script to accomplish this if possible. –  user1582375 Aug 7 '12 at 15:36
    
You might want to use a bash script, but you'll have to delegate to other utilities. e.g. in the above question you're delegating to sed. Note that sed isn't XML-aware, so it may work, but isn't a good solution long term –  Brian Agnew Aug 7 '12 at 15:38
    
what do you recommend as the best solution? I need to get only the names from the above xml file so that I can run additional queries against those names –  user1582375 Aug 7 '12 at 15:45
    
See above for a more comprehensive solution –  Brian Agnew Aug 7 '12 at 15:51
    
Does anyone know how I can complete this request by using ONLY bash scripting commands? –  user1582375 Aug 7 '12 at 15:59

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