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I am deserializing a list of objects from an XML file, and would like to bind to the actual content of those objects in my View, passing over a ViewModel. The problem is that file operations are async and this bubbles all the way up to the ViewModel, where Property getters cannot be marked as such...

Problem

  • I deserialize all XML files in a folder to Profile objects and store them in a List<Profile>. This method (has to be) marked async.

        public static async Task<List<Profile>> GetAllProfiles()
        {
            DataContractSerializer ser = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(Profile));
            StorageFolder folder = await ApplicationData.Current.RoamingFolder.CreateFolderAsync("Profiles", CreationCollisionOption.OpenIfExists);
    
            List<Profile> profiles = new List<Profile>();
            foreach (var f in await folder.GetFilesAsync())
            {
                var fs = await f.OpenStreamForReadAsync();
                profiles.Add((Profile)ser.ReadObject(fs));
               fs.Dispose();
            }
    
            return profiles;
        }
    

Ideal solution 1

  • The binding property in my ViewModel would then ideally call that static method like this

    public async Task<ObservableCollection<string>> Lists
    {
        get 
        {
            return new ObservableCollection<string>(GetAllProfiles().Select(p => p.Name));
        }
    }
    
  • BUT Properties cannot be marked async

Ideal solution 2

    public ObservableCollection<string> Lists
    {
        get 
        {
            return new ObservableCollection<string>((GetAllProfiles().Result).Select(p => p.Name));
        }
    }
  • BUT this never executes (it blocks in the await folder.GetFilesAsync() call for some reason)

Current solution

Calls an async Initialize() method that loads the result of the GetProfiles() function in a variable, and then makes a NotifyPropertyChanged("Lists") call:

    public ViewModel()
    {
        Initialize();
    }

    public async void Initialize()
    {
        _profiles = await Profile.GetAllProfiles();
        NotifyPropertyChanged("Lists");
    }

    private List<Profile> _profiles;
    public ObservableCollection<string> Lists
    {
        get
        {
            if (_profiles != null)
                return new ObservableCollection<string>(_profiles.Select(p => p.Name));
            else
                return null;
        }
    }

Question

Is there a better way? Is there a pattern/method that I haven't yet discovered?

Edit

The root of the problem appears when doing non-UI code, and you cannot rely on the NotifyPropertyChanged to do some thread-synchronization stuff. -- The method Initialize has to be awaited and ctors cannot be async, so essentialy this is pattern is useless.

    public MyClass()
    {
        Initialize();
    }

    public async void Initialize()
    {
        _profiles = await Profile.GetAllProfiles();
    }

    private ObservableCollection<Profile> _profiles;
    public ObservableCollection<string> Lists
    {
        get
        {
            return _profiles; // this will always be null
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
You should raise the PropertyChanged event when you set your _profiles value. Additionally - _profiles and Lists are different types - they need to be the same type. –  Filip Skakun Aug 10 '12 at 14:45
    
agree (this is just copy/paste pseudocode), but this just plain C# so no UI code nor PropertyChanged event that is available. What I want is to get the Result from an async method without having to mark all my methods as async (because when you hit the UI, it stops), and the .Result() call deadlocks as we found out below... –  Wouter Van Ranst Aug 10 '12 at 15:11
    
Well then, you need to use it in a view model, implement INotifyPropertyChanged and raise the event. –  Filip Skakun Aug 10 '12 at 15:13
    
Assume its code for a business class that has nothing to do with the UI :) –  Wouter Van Ranst Aug 10 '12 at 16:32
    
Well then it would be in the model side of the MVVM world and the view model would need to wait for the model to be updated before raising its PropertyChanged. Otherwise if your view is bound to your business logic model - there should be nothing preventing you from implementing INotifyPropertyChanged in the business logic model. If you can't do that - you need to otherwise wait for the profiles list to load. –  Filip Skakun Aug 10 '12 at 17:09
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1 Answer

Properties can't be async so this solution will not work as you mentioned. Task.Result waits for the task to complete, but this is blocking your UI thread where the I/O operation's async callback returns, so you are deadlocking your application, since the callback is never called. Your solution really is the best way. It could be improved though.

  • You should make the _profiles field an ObservableCollection, so you would not need to convert the List to the OC every time the list is accessed.
  • Since you are performing an I/O operation that can take arbitrary amount of time - you should enable some sort of a progress indicator while it is in progress.
  • In some cases you might want the Lists property to be lazier and only call the Init method the first time it is accessed.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer and tips. I implemented them and it's nicer indeed! Sad that there isn't a cleaner way to do this... Any clue why the ideal solution 2 blocks (and never resumes)? –  Wouter Van Ranst Aug 7 '12 at 23:00
    
The Result property is not async (as we determined), but rather a synchronous call, so the execution of the thread pauses until Result returns, which happens when the Task is done. My understanding is the async I/O operations return on the same thread as some sort of events, but the scheduler for this thread isn't running since the thread is paused waiting for the Result property to return, so no events can be handled and you end up with a deadlock. –  Filip Skakun Aug 8 '12 at 6:25
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